Consolidated Progress Report of the Mexican Farm Labor Transportation Program of the Farm Security Administration

Through November 20, 1942

30 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, California


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[INTRODUCTION]

The report which follows is an attempt to give, as of approximately November 20, 1942, a description not only of the various steps involved in the transportation of the first group of 3004 Mexican agricultural workers to the United States by the Farm Security Administration but also an account of many of the problems encountered in handling this program from its inception to a period six weeks after the arrival of the first trainload of workers in California. The report has been prepared not by any one individual but by the various individuals responsible for specific portions of what we have tried to make in operation an integrated and coordinated program. Thus, the authors include the Regional Director; the Assistant Regional Director, MA; the Regional Chief, Farm Labor Transportation Program and members of his staff; the Chief of the Labor Relations Division; the District Engineer; the General Manager of the Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association; and the Regional Information Advisor. While the responsibility for final preparation and consolidation of the report fell upon the Assistant Regional Director, MA, he neither claims the pride of authorship nor accepts full responsibility for weaknesses in the report.

Since this is the first attempt at a consolidated report on the Mexican Farm Labor Transportation Program, a considerable portion


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of the report is devoted to the procedures used both in bringing the workers to the United States and in operating the program after their arrival. It is anticipated that future reports will contain more statistical material on the working of the program, better analysis of the problems encountered in operation of the program, and more in the way of an evaluation of its scope and significance.


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THE SELECTION PROCESS

On arriving in Mexico City September 4, 1942, Mr. Gilbert Sussman of the Solicitor's Office and Mr. Laurence I. Hewes, Jr. entered into a series of discussions with the officials of the Labor Department of the Mexican Government. In the course of these discussions, they were advised that the Labor Department had established a register of persons of Mexican birth seeking employment in the United States. Although we did not see this register, it apparently contained some 12,500 names arranged by occupation. The conversations between Mr. Sussman, Mr. Hewes and two officials of the Mexican Labor Department, Senor Fernando Del Campo and Senor Abraham Navas, resulted in final agreement as to the type of contract which would be executed between the Farm Security Administration on behalf of the United States and the Mexican National who was to be transported as an agricultural laborer to the United States. A copy of this contract is attached as Exhibit A in the APPENDIX. Prior to coming to Mexico, Mr. Sussman and Mr. Hewes in conference with officials of the United States Immigration and Naturalization Services and the Selective Service agreed upon a type of permit of entry card. This permit of entry card was to be only good for the purpose of entry into the United States of agricultural laborers contracting with the Farm Security Administration.

At the time that Mr. Sussman and Mr. Hewes were engaging in


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negotiations with Mexican officials, Mr. Frank Brown, Executive Assistant to the Regional Director at Amarillo, Texas, who has been assigned to work in connection with the Mexican transportation program, was engaged in locating space, clerical assistance, photographic assistance, and office furniture to be used in connection with the actual selection process. Upon completion of the drafting of the contract mentioned above, several thousand copies of this contract were printed in Mexico City at the expense of the Farm Security Administration. Other forms necessary to the selecting and processing machinery were devised and likewise printed. Considerable amount of difficulty was met and overcome by Mr. Brown in connection with obtaining office space, light, heat, telephone, etc. These arrangements were finally completed and concurrently there arrived in Mexico City seven representatives of the United States Immigration and Naturalization Services under the supervision of Mr. Leon Brody, Immigrant Inspector at Phoenix, three Spanish-speaking United States Employment Service representatives from Texas, Dr. Joseph E. Spoto, passed Assistant Surgeon, Pan American Sanitary Bureau, temporarily assigned to do physical examination work in connection with the Farm Labor Transportation Program, Dr. Robert L. Allen, United States Public Health Service, El Paso, Texas, and the group of 27 Farm Security Administration employees under the leadership of Mr. Roland C. Lapp, District RR Supervisor, Farm Security Administration, Region IX. The Mexican Government on its part provided personnel from its Labor
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Department, Immigration Service, and six doctors from its Public Health Service.

The Selection machinery human and physical, were housed in a large building formerly used as a warehouse at 87 Calle Republica del Salvador, Mexico, D. F. The personnel was distributed at intervals behind a long trestle arranged continuously in a "U" shape in this building. The arrangement of the trestles was such that applicants for employment entering at the front door began a continuous process according to rejection or acception [sic].

The processing was so arranged that initiation of screening processes could in the first few minutes establish the worker's eligibility and aptitude as an agricultural worker and his capacity to do the work. At this point, if a negative determination was made, the applicant was rejected. The next process was that of health examination which here likewise automatically removed the applicant from further consideration. In the next several steps, subsequent to physical examination, the applicant was required to make out a work history and was vigorously interviewed to determine the agricultural aspect of his work history. Every effort was made to discourage persons from entering upon this program if they were in any way half-hearted or regarded the trip to the United States as a joy ride or a lighthearted adventure. A good many persons were discouraged at this point. Subsequent to this process the workers, having been examined in groups, received a forty-five minute lecture


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on the contract, the employer's rights, and the obligations which they assumed in signing the contract. Also at this time the type of work, loading and topping sugar beets, was carefully explained, as was the method of compensation (piece work, etc.). This explanation was handled by a representative of the Farm Security Administration and the Mexican Department of Labor. Following this, the Mexican national executed the contract, was registered under alien registration, was processed by American Immigration, Mexican Immigration, and was discharged at the final clearance desk where he was advised as to the time the train left and the time he should be at the station. Reference should also be made to several details of interest, such as the establishment by the Mexican Public Health Service of a Venereal Social case worker who took data on those persons rejected for venereal infection and the smallpox vaccination desk which was similarly set up to vaccinate those workers not previously vaccinated.

The above-described machinery began operating on a Monday morning, September 21, 1942, the Mexican Government having already sent out postcards in the mail to several hundred workers listed as agricultural workers in the occupation register previously mentioned. These card holders, together with many hundreds more, appeared at the entrance of 87 Republica del Salvador bright and early in the morning. The first group of four candidates was admitted about 8:30 AM and the machinery began to operate. One of the great


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difficulties encountered was the inability of the private photographer under contract for this work to keep pace with the flow of the candidates, and several very hectic incidents occurred in the first several days in the operation whereby we found ourselves with several hundred workers in the building whose processing through the machinery was stopped because of the failure to quickly obtain photographs for immigration purposes. On the first morning some 45 persons out of the first 150 had been rejected because of venereal infection. From then on the number of candidates with venereal infections dropped off very fast; apparently persons not caring to expose themselves to the embarrassment of being rejected did not present themselves as candidates. The work was extremely hard and gruelling. Every person of the nearly 60 officials was under tremendous strain and worked at top speed. In the first day's work we had completed processing on 85 candidates. The next day we handled over 100. From then on the machinery improved every day and, consequently, we were able to make our first shipment of 500 workers from Buena Vista Station, Mexico City at 11:57 AM, September 25, 1942. The workers were delivered at Stockton on September 29. This was a real satisfaction to us, since the date of arrival of October 1, 1942 was the day we had been "shooting" for at the time of our Washington conferences. As it was, we made delivery two days earlier. By the time the first train was on its way, our machinery was working so perfectly that it was turning out completely examined, certified
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candidates at the rate of 300 a day, ready to get on the train. It can be stated roughly that, to obtain the first 600 so entrained, it was necessary to examine about 650 individuals, medical reasons accounting for the larger portion of rejects. These men tend to be short, average a little over 5 feet, and they are light, averaging about 120 pounds or less. Their physical configuration is good and it is easy to see that they are, although short and light, strong, wiry and well put together.

Looking back on the experience of "starting from scratch" to organize and perfect the selection machinery, a good job was done when we recognize that no person involved in this work had ever done it or anything like it before. The pressure, the long hours, the uncomfortable working conditions, certainly made the task no less easy. Many handicaps presented themselves, such as the unfamiliarity with the Spanish language, our own physical handicaps in working at the high altitude of Mexico City, etc. Our day began at 8:00 AM. At 8:30 the doors were opened and the machinery went into gear. From then on until 1:00 PM no person had time to do anything but work at top speed. From 1:00 until 3:30 we followed the custom and took siesta, that is, some of the personnel did. Some of the others remained to work and complete details forgotten in the morning rush. At 3:30 we recommended and carried on until 7:15 PM. When the last candidate went out the door at 7:15 PM until about 10:30 PM, we completed the necessary detail work, completing


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records, making final checks, etc. It should be borne in mind that only by exercising the most painstaking care and developing systems for close checking to secure accuracy can anything like satisfactory results be obtained from such an undertaking as above. The number of workers must be carefully checked against the number of contracts issued, and these in turn checked against immigration documents, etc. On Friday morning, September 25, 1942, a group of officials of the Farm Security Administration, the United States Immigration Service and the Mexican Immigration Department set up desks at the Buena Vista Station, Mexico, D. F. The accepted candidates filed by these desks and were entrained. The whole entrainment operation took about one and a half hours. The workers were told to be at the station at 8:00 in the morning and they were entrained by 9:30.


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THE TRANSPORTATION PROCESS

When it has been determined that a group of Mexican workers is to be selected in Mexico for transportation to the United by the Farm Security Administration and while the machinery for selection described above is being placed in operation, the Head, Transportation, on the staff of the Assistant Regional Director, MA in San Francisco notifies the Southern Pacific Company in San Francisco, giving them the point of selection and the destination points. The Southern Pacific Company, in accordance with their agreement, files with the Interstate Commerce Commission a rate between possible selection points and destinations. This rate is equal to about 75% of the usual one-way coach fare.

At the same time as these steps are being taken, the Transportation Supervisor in Mexico City notifies the National Railways of Mexico and the Southern Pacific Company of Mexico of the proposed movements, and arrangements are made for the special trains required. The workers with whom contracts are signed, are scheduled for departure at a specified time and date. This information, printed on an envelope also bearing the worker's name and a number corresponding to the number on all documents issued to him, is given each worker as he leaves the selection office.

On the day designated, the workers are assembled at the station and each man is checked against his photograph by the U. S. Immigration and Mexican Immigration authorities and loaded on the train. A


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transportation crew composed of Farm Security Administration personnel is placed in charge of each train. The transportation crew includes an agent cashier who carries government funds to provide for emergencies that might arise on the trip, such as medical care, extra meals due to train delays, telegrams, phone calls, etc. The agent cashier also maintains a record of the movement, which includes data on the number of men fed at each meal, number transported to each destination point, reports of accidents, cost of subsistence and medical aid furnished en route.

As soon as the train is underway, the crew makes a check of each man on board against a passenger list. The corrected passenger list is then checked against the American Immigration cards to determine if anyone has boarded the train before being checked by the Immigration officials. If any worker is discovered who has not been so checked, he is taken off the train at the next station and sent back to the point of origin at the expense of the U. S. government.

The transportation crew, upon completing this check, appoints a leader for each car of men and holds a meeting in each car, explaining in detail what the feeding schedule and routine will be while en route to the United States, as well as the cooperation required from each worker. The men are instructed to form groups of about ten each and every group selects a leader. Several hours before reaching the border, each worker is checked against his photograph and is given the original of his Mexican Agreement Immigration Card and the


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original copy of the contract he has signed. Upon reaching the border, the workers are transferred to cars of the Southern Pacific Company of the United States at a point on the Mexican side of the border. At the border, the train is checked by U. S. Immigration officials who give each worker an American Immigration Card bearing his photograph and the date of entry. Immediately upon crossing the border, the workers are forbidden to get off the train until they reach their destination or are required to transfer to other transportation equipment. This is in contrast to the trip in Mexico, where workers are allowed to get off at all stations and roam at will. It should be noted in passing that, while in Mexico, a detachment of ten or fifteen soldiers from the Mexican Army accompanies each train.

The transportation crews are on duty on each train 24 hours each day and they settle innumerable small problems that arise among the men. The life of a member of the transportation crew is extremely difficult and wearing.

Continuous cooperation is maintained at all times between U. S. Government personnel, Mexican Government officials and railroad officials, so that the maximum physical comfort possible is provided for the workers. Failure of sanitary facilities, water supply, etc. is quickly reported, and extra stops are made, if necessary, to effect repairs. Each train is met at the U. S. border by a transportation crew from San Francisco. This crew takes charge of the train


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and the other agents return to Mexico City. The new crew has a list of growers and the number of workers required at each destination, and he proceeds to group the workers in accordance with this list. Since the workers are already in groups of tens, this process consists of combining the small groups into larger groups, besides a small amount of regrouping to provide the correct number for each grower.

The men are fed in a dining car in Mexico when transported by the National Railways of Mexico, and they are fed hot meals at their seats when travelling on the Southern Pacific of Mexico. With minor exceptions, all meals provided in the U. S. have been box lunches furnished on a contract with the Southern Pacific Company. Rail equipment is very limited in Mexico—the National Railways of Mexico have 13 coaches in their entire system not assigned to regular trains and the Southern Pacific of Mexico has nine coaches, three of which are second class cars and have only wooden seats. The National Railways have not been willing to accept the Southern Pacific's suggestion that this equipment be pooled, and so the next best arrangement has been affected. A special train is sent through Juarez on the National Railways and the empty cars are immediately returned to Mexico City—usually within six days. They are then loaded again and sent to Guadalajara, a trip of about 15 hours. At Guadalajara, the men are transferred to equipment of the Southern Pacific and the National Railways equipment is immediately returned to Mexico City, where it is serviced and ready for another trip to


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Juarez—within three days of the previous trip to Guadalajara. When shipments can be spaced seven or more days apart, it is preferable to send all movements through Juarez, as this trip is 24 hours shorter than by way of Guadalajara and Nogales and the feeding facilities are much better. The National Railways has provided a business car with sleeping accommodations for the transportation crew at no additional cost to the U. S. government.

At the point of destination, the group is checked off the train. The list of workers and the workers' cards are turned over to the Associate Employment Supervisor. (See Exhibit B for Schedule of Mexican Workers Transported). The workers' cards are set up in the Employment office as follows: The yellow workers' cards, after having the Growers' camp number inserted, are filed in numerical order. The triplicate identification card is filed alphabetically. The lists of the workers by Grower are filed in the Growers' folders which are filed alphabetically. A list of growers is then made assigning a number to each in a continuous series. This number will be the workers group number.

A train of 500 workers requires a minimum of four government employees in order that it may be handled with maximum efficiency. A crew of this size makes it possible to organize the workers carefully and to have all persons and documents checked before the train reaches the border, so that no delay is caused in crossing into the U. S.


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HOUSING

Upon receipt of information from the U. S. Employment Service that it appeared likely that a certification would be cleared through proper channels for 3000 Mexican workers to be used in sugar beets, the Farm Security Administration immediately took the necessary steps to inspect and approve housing for these workers.

Prior to field inspection, which was to be the basis for certification of the housing for transported beet workers, a feasible minimum housing standard was agreed upon and this outline met all requirements of the State Labor Code and the California State Division of Immigration and Housing.

In field inspection an attempt was made to locate sufficient existing housing that would meet the minimum standard or better. Where existing housing was found to be below standard and no other was available, field inspectors listed in detail those improvements, repairs and items necessary to meet the minimum standard. This list was in the form of an agreement which the inspector and the grower or other responsible party was required to sign. All work was to be done prior to the arrival of the workers and was to be subject to reinspection.

Reinspection was made where major repairs or new construction was to be done, or where some doubt existed in the mind of the field inspector as to the willingness or ability of the grower to


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make the repairs.

Inspection was done with the intention and objective of using the best of the available housing. Critical points of inspection were clean surroundings, safe disposal of human and food wastes, safe water supply, provision for washing of persons and laundry, and a structurally safe and reasonably weather-tight house.

The inspectors, with their engineering and architectural background, advised the growers as to how the minimum standard could be met, and left illustrative material if construction of toilets or shower baths was needed. In many cases, housing would meet standards if minor repairs such as clearing away of weeds and junk and a general all-around cleaning and disinfecting were done.

The available housing found by the field inspectors ranged from very poor to very good. The better housing was found on properties of the larger growers and in camps constructed by the sugar companies. This was due to the fact that these growers required larger quotas and could afford to hire the necessary cooks, supervisors and caretakers to properly operate the camp. The camp and housing was originally designed for this purpose and would include all necessary facilities.

The poorer housing was found principally among the smaller growers. This was due to the fact that in previous years smaller growers depended on workers living in town or on transients carrying their own housing and equipment. Those workers who wished and asked for housing were directed to any shed or structure the small grower


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had available, and it was up to the workers to put it in clean and livable condition, if they wished.

In cases where the camps were of such low standard that the required improvements would be a considerable undertaking, the growers, in collaboration with the sugar company officials, frequently arranged for housing needed by workers at a nearby camp of higher standard. A number of substitutions of this nature were made, so that the end effect has been to keep the workers out of the lowest class of housing.

In nearly all cases, growers were found willing to do whatever was suggested and believe the standards set up were reasonable. Their only complaint was that certain facilities, such as showers, flytight privies, clean houses and so on were misused and in many cases, such as shower houses, previous experience indicated that they would not be used at all. All growers seemed to agree that housing of a better standard should be furnished; that the workers deserved a decent place to live. Some growers expressed little sympathy with the workers because of their misuse and destruction of these facilities, if and when they were furnished in the past.

The following exhibits on Housing will be found in the APPENDIX:

Exhibit C — Housing inspection for Trains #1, #2, #3, #4 and #5.

Exhibit D — "Check Sheet for Inspection of Housing and Sanitary Facilities" (Form FSA 505)

Exhibit E — List of Repairs to be made as set forth by Form FSA 505 to bring housing up to said standard


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Exhibit F — A list of repairs to be made for a camp requiring major improvements

Exhibit G — A mimeographed illustration of FSA-designed-and-suggested house and privy toilet

Exhibit H — Housing Standards for FSA-transported workers in California


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MEDICAL CARE

The Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association became a part of the Mexican Labor Program subsequent to an agreement with the Farm Security Administration that the Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association would assume responsibility for extending medical care to all Mexican Nationals transported into California and Arizona by the Farm Security Administration.

Two nurses from the Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association were dispatched to Mexico City to assist in the enrollment of the Mexican labor. Physical examinations were given by both the United States and Mexican Public Health Services to all of the Mexican nationals before they were finally accepted for transportation. In this physical examination, attempts were made to eliminate any applicants suffering from tuberculosis, cardiac conditions, venereal diseases, and any other chronic condition or disability injury.

Nurses of the Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association were assigned to the various localities where the Mexican laborers were distributed on the ranches operated by the sugar beet growers. The nurse, with the assistance of a stenographer, immediately made up individual membership certificates and corresponding account records for each Mexican national. As soon as these medical cards were made up, they were placed in the hands of the Farm Security Administration's agent for distribution to the Mexican nationals.

Instructions for use of the membership certificate in the


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Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association were given to the ranch owners, the group leaders, and wherever possible to the individual Mexican national. These instructions were very simple, namely:

"When the Mexican national becomes ill, send him to a doctor listed on the panel of physicians that has been supplied."

This panel included the majority of local physicians and was supplied to the rancher or group leader.

In the majority of areas, to date, the workers were so scattered that clinic operation was not desirable nor feasible. Where such concentration develops to warrant clinic operation, the only variation in the instructions will be for the Mexican national to be sent to the clinic when ill, except during nights or week-ends. At that time, he should again go directly to the physician.

Medical service, necessary surgery, dental service, hospitalization, laboratory service, and X-ray are being supplied the Mexican nationals through the Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association.

As of November 20, 1942, a total of 430 Mexican nationals were treated for 458 illnesses, representing an encumbrance of $3926.64 to date. (See following Table).


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Mexican Labor — Encumbrances through November 20, 1942         
Physicians  Dentists  Hospitals  Drugs  Misc. 
October  $ 694.50  $19.00  $ 376.60  $23.89  $14.50  $1128.49 
November (to date)  1739.65  34.50  1006.00  18.00  2798.15 
Totals (to date)  $2434.15  $53.50  $1382.60  $23.89  $32.50  $3926.64 

Diseases of the respiratory and digestive systems were most prevalent. However, a large number of minor accidents were reported, which included, mainly, lacerations, bruises and sprains. Tables I and II, which appear in the APPENDIX as Exhibits I and J respectively, give the members served and a diagnostic breakdown of illnesses into types of services rendered. The incidence of illness has averaged 10% per month to date, which appears to be higher than the rate of other similar programs. However, in view of the type of illnesses reported, this in all probability is due to the change in climate and diet.


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COMPENSATION

Under the supplemental agreement made between the Farm Security Administration and California Field Crops, Inc. the latter corporation agreed to insure Mexicans transported in its behalf against injuries occurring during employment. Accordingly, California Field Crops, Inc. insured with the Pacific Indemnity Company.

As patron to the transported Mexican workers, the Farm Security Administration has a responsibility to them to see that their rights in this connection are properly recognized. In view of the fact that the Farm Security Administration is also obligated to see that all necessary medical assistance is secured by these workers, it has a further responsibility both to the workers and to the Federal Government for seeing that bona fide compensation cases are promptly and satisfactorily handled.

For the purpose of this report, the Pacific Indemnity Company was asked to furnish this Administration with a review of cases handled by it to date, and the Solicitor's Office was asked for an opinion as to the possible prejudice to employees' compensation rights in the event of failure to report them promptly and accurately.

The Pacific Indemnity Company is furnishing us with a list of the names of workers now in their possession as "file cases", but this will not be available in time for current analysis. It will be used primarily as a basis for direction of the field staff


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in providing follow-up on compensable cases.

The important information furnished us by the Pacific Indemnity Company is that they have started approximately 240 injury case files; but, of these, at least 100 are incomplete in that there have been no "employer's report of injury" filed for them. It is to be noted that the insurance company does not consider any case a claim case until it has been furnished with the employer's report.

The report from the Solicitor's Office indicates that the appropriate procedure is for the worker to give formal notice to the employer within 30 days of the occurrence of the injury. However, where the injury actually has become a matter of the employer's knowledge, regardless of method, the rights of the worker to compensation are not prejudiced, even in the absence of formal notice.

No comprehensive analysis of the cause and character of injuries has yet been received, but it is understood that hand and finger cuts from mishandling of the sugar beet knife greatly predominate. In some cases, the knife injuries have resulted in permanent loss of digits. Other more serious injuries such as a broken pelvis from a fall and even death due to crushing by a sugar beet truck have occurred.


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WAGES

Three major facts should be noted in connection with wages in the sugar beet industry as applied to transported Mexican workers:

(1) The prevailing wages as recommended by the California Farm Wage Board failed to accurately reflect the extremely complicated practices actually in operation and necessary to the employment of workers under the Farm Labor Transportation Program.

(2) The transportation of workers has a depressive effect on wages.

(3) In the absence of free bargaining between workers and employers (even on an individual basis) under the restrictive conditions of the Farm Security Administration contracts, no acceptable formula has been developed that will produce a wage, fair and equitable to worker and grower alike.

The question of wages has been the chief "thorn in the flesh" during the employment phase of the program. The method of determining wages and paying workers in sugar beets is a complicated system long established by custom. Difficulties in applying this customary method have arisen largely because an attempt was made to retain the tonnage rate of payment while at the same time eliminating the key individual who made the tonnage rate possible—the labor contractor.

In previous years it has been the general practice of sugar beet growers to have their beets harvested for them on a contract basis by a labor contractor who obtained the contract on a bid basis. The contractor looks a field over, estimates the number of tons of beets it will yield and the amount of labor involved


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in the topping and loading process. He then offers to harvest the beets for a rate per ton which he estimates will cover costs and make him a profit. The contractor thus assumes all responsibility for getting the beets out, provides the labor, supervises and pays same, provides food and in some cases housing for the workers.

Under such an arrangement, the grower pays the contractor on a tonnage basis but the contractor normally pays his labor on an hourly basis according to the ability of the individual worker. Furthermore, he groups his men according to abilities so that men of approximately equal skill work together in a crew. Such grouping is highly important, since the topping and loading process is by its very nature a group enterprise and the presence of slow workers in a crew holds the whole crew back. Under these conditions it is quite common for several crews to be working in adjacent fields at widely varying hourly rates.

Into this pattern of employment, the Farm Security Administration has attempted to fit 3000 transported Mexican nationals who never before had any opportunity to see a sugar beet and who represented only about one third of the total labor employed in the sugar beet harvest. The transportation program automatically eliminated the labor contractor, since it was the association of growers who contracted with the Farm Security Administration directly for the labor.

The original rates for the program as established by the Secretary of Agriculture called for an increase of 20% over the Sugar


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Division scale established earlier in the year for beets harvested on a tonnage basis. On a time basis, the prevailing rate for Northern California was set at 65¢ per hour. In Southern California, that is to say the Salinas and Santa Maria areas, tonnage rates only were established and they were set at the scale recommended by the Sugar Division, plus a bonus of 10¢ per ton. It was presumptive that the established prevailing scale would remain in force unless and until supplanted by a new finding made by the California Wage Board although, of course, it was permissive on the part of the growers to pay in excess of these established rates, if they so desired. Although some growers still adhere to this established scale, a very substantial number are now paying in excess of it, whether on a tonnage or hourly basis.

Since neither the Farm Security Administration nor the growers involved had had any previous experience with the workers transported, it was impossible to group the workers in advance according to ability. Since the workers had had no experience in beets it was difficult for them to make a good production showing on a tonnage basis during the first weeks of work and impossible for them to make any estimate of what their earning would be. They could not estimate what the yield of the fields would be nor how much they could produce, and, although technically they had the right of collective bargaining with the growers on a satisfactory tonnage rate just as a contractor would, actually such a right did not exist,


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since they did not have the knowledge on which to bargain. They had no contractor to bargain for them and the Farm Security Administration had no authority to assume such a role. The 3000 transported workers, therefore, found themselves working for an indefinite amount of wages, while in adjoining fields, experienced domestic workers employed by contractors were known to be getting fixed hourly rates ranging from 50¢ to 80¢ an hour. Dissatisfaction, misunderstandings, work stoppages were the inevitable result. Furthermore, it soon became apparent that, while a contractor with experienced domestic crews could be paid by the grower the tonnage rate established by the Secretary and still pay his laborers 75¢ an hour, inexperienced transported workers could not be paid the tonnage scale directly and still earn anywhere near 75¢ an hour.

The development of a satisfactory basis of payment for transported workers in the face of these difficulties has been a tremendous task involving the mediation of countless individual disagreements. Two general practices have developed out of these individual settlements. The majority of the transported workers, except those working in the Salinas-Santa Maria areas, are now being paid by growers on a straight hourly rate according to the ability of the crew (many crews had been regrouped to bring together men of more nearly equal ability). Hourly rates vary from 65¢ to 90¢. A large percentage of the workers are still working on a tonnage basis. Earnings in these cases are averaging about 50¢ to 55¢ an, although


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they range from less than 30¢ to in excess of 90¢. In many instances, however, crows continuing on a tonnage basis are now bargaining themselves with growers on the tonnage rate to be paid. This is now possible on the basis of several weeks' experience in the beets. The attached Exhibit K in the APPENDIX gives some idea of earnings, though figures are as yet quite incomplete.

It is evident from the experience to date that the only really satisfactory basis of payment for workers transported from Mexico is the hourly rate. The exact amount involved is not nearly so important as the worker's ability to understand the basis of payment and to know before he starts to work just what he will make. (See Exhibit L for Reporting Form used to show Weekly Work and Earnings (Form IX-543)).


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MEDIATION

The over-all activity of the employment staff in the field has been basically concerned with work adjustment. Through the continuous farm visits made and reported, the entire working and living conditions of the men are continuously under surveillance. By making periodic appraisals of working conditions, housing, sanitation, and general living conditions, sources of difficulties are anticipated in advance, and the necessary steps taken to alleviate these difficulties before they develop into disputes or complaints.

In making a farm visit and preparing the Farm Visit Report, the Assistant Employment Supervisor talks to the workers on the farm, the grower and/or the foreman. As a general practice, the Assistant Employment Supervisor attempts to see all parties concerned at the same time, so that the discussion held will represent each point of view, and provide an opportunity for clear understanding on the part of both the employer and the employees.

The entire emphasis at the time of the field visit is to: (1) determine the sources and reasons of friction and (2) settle informally, but concretely and conclusively, whatever issues are presented as problems.

As a problem is presented or develops in the field relative to the working or living conditions, the Assistant Employment Supervisor attempts to gather informally all the facts relative to the problem. He attempts to interpret both the problem and the


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facts to the workers and to the employer, and on the basis of these facts to suggest and recommend a reasonable and equitable solution, if one is readily apparent.

The Assistant Employment Supervisor makes a written report on the Farm Visit Report (Form IX-533) of each and every dispute or problem presented to him or discovered by him. He also reports what he was able to effect in the mediation of the problem. Should his solution not be satisfactory nor acceptable at the time of the farm visit, the problem is referred to Labor Relations, either for mediation by Labor Relations or the conducting of a formal hearing. (Exhibits M and N in the APPENDIX are samples of completed Farm Visit Reports (Form IX-533)).

Properly speaking, there have been no mediation activities as such in connection with the transportation program. This derives from the fact that the respective contracts drawn between the Farm Security Administration and the growers on the one hand and between the Farm Security Administration and the workers on the other may be regarded as the final authority in the handling of virtually every question of working or other conditions that has arisen and from the fact that the workers have never organized in such a manner that they could be regarded as a bona fide collective bargaining unit. Adjustments made in the application of the original contracts have taken three different forms.

  • (1) The field staff has been faced with a tremendous job of conciliation and adjustment based in part on misunderstanding
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    of the original contracts and in part on the practicability of applying some of the terms and conditions of the original contracts.
  • (2) Considerable attention has been directed toward the adjustment of individual workers to conditions prevailing in sugar beet work or other alternative employment under the transportation program.
  • (3) There have been some major adjustments in the total terms of the contract. After a decision has been made with respect to an adjustment in any of these three categories, the decision of the Farm Security Administration has been conclusive and neither party has had substantial recourse from the decision. The presumptive penalties have been forfeiture of bond by the growers on the one hand and return to Mexico by the workers on the other hand.

With respect to the first type of adjustments, that is conciliation of specific grievances between workers and growers on the farm, a partial analysis has been made covering workers sent to the Northern California area including Chico, Sacramento and Stockton. In the month of October there were 1978 transported workers in this area divided among 80 different groups. It was necessary for the field personnel to conciliate or render final decisions in connection with 91 wage grievances, 37 grievances over board, 70 grievances with respect to housing condition, and 46 other grievances of a


32
miscellaneous character.

Wage disputes revolved about payment of tonnage scale rather than an hourly scale; the inadequacy of tonnage rates on the lower yield acreages; the rates of pay received by transported workers in relation to those received by domestic workers; and the adequacy of wages (advances) actually received. Adjustments with respect to board involved the cost to worker, the adequacy of diet, and the quality of food preparation. Housing adjustments involved cleanliness and adequacy of the housing and furnishings, and the sanitary and bathing facilities. Miscellaneous adjustments involved a variety of things such as the accessibility of stores, the attitude of the management in field supervision, and the availability of recreational, educational, medical and other facilities.

A qualitative summary of this type of adjustment indicates that a high degree of reasonableness was exhibited both by employers and by workers and that, in spite of the substantial number of grievances arising, they were adjusted with relatively little lost working time and solved for the most part without recourse to arbitrary action.

The second general type of adjustment, that relating to maladjusted individuals, involved the handling of workers who deserted the growers to which they were assigned. This type of adjustment does not lend itself to generalization.

Major adjustments in the actual operating terms of the program were made in four instances. In effect, three of these adjustments


33
represented a concession on the part of the growers with respect to the literal terms of the contract. However, their advantage derived from the fact that they received an assurance of continuity of work performance on the part of the transported workers that unquestionably compensated for any nominal monetary loss. Actually these agreements were between the Farm Security Administration and California Field Crops, Inc., although they bound the workers and the direct employers.

The first of these was the Sacramento agreement covering Chico, Sacramento and Stockton areas which provided for a flat hourly rate of 65¢ over a two week period. This was agreed to in order that the workers would not be subjected to low tonnage rate earnings during the period of acclimatization. At the end of the two-week period, it was agreed that the grower should have the option of deciding the basis on which work would be continued. In effecting this agreement in the Chico area, the latter intention was inadvertently transposed and the workers were given the option of deciding the basis of payment.

The second agreement was made in Salinas when, after a period of some difficulty, it was agreed that the tonnage rate on each field would be determined on the basis of a field bargain made by the grower and the worker prior to the entry of the workers into the field. This removed from the grower the arbitrary right to determine the advance payment or to rely exclusively upon the wage board scale as the authoritative basis for payment.


34

The third agreement was made at Santa Maria and provided for an over-all increase of 20% in the tonnage rates paid to transported workers. This agreement affected only 44 workers.

Finally a general agreement was reached with California Field Crops, Inc. as to the disposition of workers who at the end of the second month of employment were still regarded by employers as unable to perform satisfactorily. The feeling was expressed by the Corporation that, if from 10% to 15% of workers who were substandard performers could be removed from the beet fields, a substantial improvement in labor relations would result. Farm Security acceded to this request, largely because alternative employments were developing and such separation from sugar beets would not automatically result in the return of the workers to Mexico.


35

FORMAL COMPLAINTS

The formal complaint proceeding has been established for the unique type of situation in which it appears that the solution may involve the return of the affected worker or workers to Mexico and in the termination of the employment agreement with the Farm Security Administration. Such a solution is of drastic character and may involve an arbitrary decision contrary to the wishes of the worker. It is imperative, therefore, that a concise and accurate statement of the related factors be recorded in a formal manner in order that there may exist a permanent record, should any further question arise as to the propriety of the action. This record is maintained on a Formal Complaint Report (Form IX-542), a copy of which appears as Exhibit P in the APPENDIX. The procedure requires that the Formal Complaint Reports be prepared by a representative of the Labor Division. Such representative may be a member of the Labor Division staff or a member of the Management staff who has received specific delegation of authority.

On the basis of reports cleared through the Labor Division office, there have been to date 250 actions involving the formal complaint proceeding. Of these, 241 were initiated by workers claiming unwillingness or inability to continue work in sugar beets and 9 were initiated by growers who charged that the workers involved were not able to perform satisfactorily. In disposing of these cases, 203 were repatriated and 47 assigned to the Forest Service


36
Guayule Project at Salinas.

Unwillingness of workers to perform satisfactorily stemmed from a dislike of sugar beet employment in 78 cases; from personal reasons such as illness or death in the family of the worker in Mexico, or homesickness, in 49 cases; from objection to the tonnage basis of payment in 9 cases; from dislike of the treatment afforded them by growers in 9 cases; from inability to get along with their fellow workers in 7 cases; from dislike of climatic conditions in 5 cases; and from a general dislike of any farm work in 16 cases. Inability to perform sugar beet work as a basis of repatriation or assignment to employment in guayule was due in 11 cases, because the workers were handicapped by injuries of one kind or another suffered prior to their entry into the United States. In one case, the Mexican Government required repatriation. The actual cause of inability to work in the remaining 65 cases in this class is not clear from the record, but, in general, it is believed to involve the absence of sufficient vigor, strength and ruggedness to meet the exacting requirements of the rigorous task of topping and loading sugar beets.


37

REPATRIATION

Repatriation occurs immediately following the termination of of the worker's contract with the Farm Security Administration.

The Employment Termination Agreement (Form IX-546) is executed in every instance when a decision is made to repatriate a worker to Mexico. Regardless of the reason for repatriation, prior to the execution of the Employment Termination Agreement, a Formal Complaint Report (Form IX-542) is completed, showing thereon the facts that lead to the decision to repatriate. Copies of sample cases in which Form IX-546 and IX-542 were used appear as Exhibits O and P in the APPENDIX.

At the time the Mexican national contracts to work in United States agriculture, it is assumed that he will continue to work during the period of his contract agreement. However, many and varied circumstances arise which make it necessary to terminate the contract and repatriate the worker prior to the normal termination date. As is shown in the accompanying Table, Exhibit Q, the reason for repatriation of the 165 nationals returned prior to November 21, 1942 are varied. Three broad categories may be summarized as:

  • (1) Physical inability to perform work in sugar beets
  • (2) Unwillingness to perform work in sugar beets
  • (3) Illness and/or family difficulties

The worker may be considered for repatriation at the request of either (1) the worker himself, (2) the employer, or (3) the Farm


38
Security Administration. If the worker requests repatriation, the reasons for the request and the findings thereof are incorporated on the Formal Complaint Report form, and the recommendation of the Labor Relations Specialist or his designated agent is made. If the decision is a recommendation of repatriation, the Assistant Employment Supervisor executes and the worker signs the Employment Termination Agreement. If either the employer or the Farm Security Administration has a complaint indicating that the worker's contract has been broken, the Labor Relations Specialist conducts a hearing based on the Formal Complaint Report. The findings are recorded, and if the recommendation is "Repatriation", a Termination Agreement is executed.

As soon as the Termination Agreement is signed, the Agent Cashier arranges transportation for the worker and/or group of workers to return to Mexico. Prior to the actual entrainment, the Assistant Employment Supervisor advises the Regional Office by wire of the name and number of the worker, the reason for repatriation, and the train on which the worker is being returned. The Assistant Employment Supervisor also wires the Immigration Inspector at El Paso information concerning the name and number of the worker and what train he is traveling on.

Information as to the name and number of workers to be repatriated, the reasons for repatriation, and the train on which they are to be repatriated is sent by the Assistant Employment Supervisor to the


39
Assistant Regional Director, MA in San Francisco. A wire is then sent from the Regional Office to Mr. Frank Brown in Mexico City as to the names, contract numbers, reasons for repatriation, and probable time of arrival of each group of workers.

As previously indicated, by November 1, 1942 165 of the 3004 Mexican nationals were repatriated, and the process is a continuing one, with small groups of workers leaving each week.

Prior to repatriation, the Employment Staff verifies that all wages due the worker have been received by him and requests a Final Earnings Report from the employer. Upon receipt of this Final Earnings Report, the Regional Office notifies California Field Crops, Inc. to forward immediately the 10% of the worker's earnings which has been deducted. This 10% is then forwarded to the Denver Accounting Division for transmittal to Mexico, where it will be available to the repatriated worker.

Copies of the formal Complaint Report and Employment Termination Agreement are retained in the worker's file in the Regional Office; copies of the Formal Complaint Report are also forwarded to the Mexico City Farm Security Administration Office, so that the complete information relative to repatriated men may be available to the Mexican Government.


40

MISSING WORKERS

Up to and including November 14, 1942, 103 Mexican nationals have disappeared and have not been relocated.

For a short time at the beginning of the program, the Immigration Service assigned three inspectors to the Farm Security Administration. The primary work of these inspectors was to attempt to locate immediately any and all Mexican nationals reported as missing. However, during the first week in November, the Immigration Service withdrew the inspectors from the local offices, thus necessitating a change in the procedure relative to missing men. Currently, the procedure for handling men reported as missing is as follows:

  • (1) The Field Office keeps a calendar record of all men reported as missing. This record indicates the date the office was notified of the disappearance, and the name of the person or organization reporting the disappearance.
  • (2) As soon as a man is reported missing, the Employment Staff makes a reasonable attempt locally to locate the man.
  • (3) If the man is not found, he is given a waiting period of six days to return voluntarily. If he is still missing at the end of this six-day period, the Assistant Employment Supervisor notifies in writing the nearest office of the Immigration Service. This notification includes whatever pertinent facts are available, as well as identifying data
    41
    about the missing man. At the same time, a copy of the letter to the Immigration Service is forwarded to the Regional Office, and an additional copy is placed in the worker's file in the Field Office. At this point, the missing worker becomes the responsibility of the U. S. Immigration Service.

There have been many more men reported as missing than indicated in the above figure of 103. However, the majority of workers reported as missing have to date been located by the Employment Staff, and the men either returned to their assigned employer, transferred to other employers, or were repatriated. Most of the missing men, later located, have been found working elsewhere than with their assigned employer. This was particularly true during the first several weeks of the program when there was rather general misunderstanding on the part of those men reported as missing. This condition may essentially be attributed to the policy of "pirating" as practiced by some agricultural employers. It is believed that the workers now understand the terms under which their contracts have been assigned to California Field Crops, Inc., and are not transferring into other work to the extent previously reported. It is of interest to note that the great majority of missing men were reported from those areas where the wage structure was under continuous dispute. In those areas where the wage structure was clearly defined and satisfactory to all parties, only a negligible number of men were reported as missing. (See Exhibit R for estimates of missing workers)


42

TRANSFER TO GUAYULE PRIOR TO EXPIRATION OF ORIGINAL CONTRACT

Shortly after October 15, 1942 it was apparent that a certain small percentage of the Mexican workers in sugar beets would not be able to perform the work. This meant that these workers would have to be repatriated, so formal conversations were held with officials of the Forestry Service to explore the possibilities of using Mexican nationals in the expanding guayule projects in California. The Forestry Service indicated that they were faced with a definite labor shortage in guayule and expressed a willingness and desire to utilize a relatively small number of Mexican nationals at either their Salinas or Patterson projects. A decision was reached, and confirmed by memorandum, to experiment with a limited number of Mexican nationals at the Salinas guayule project. It was determined to assign certain selected workers to guayule who were unable to perform the work in sugar beets primarily for physical reasons. The assignment of these workers was first made only from the Salinas area, and these assignments were made on an individual basis, after a determination that the worker could not perform sugar beet work. Beginning on the 10th of November, arrangements were made for the Stockton and Sacramento areas to offer guayule work to workers who were unable to perform in the sugar beets and would otherwise have to be repatriated immediately. Up to and including November 21, approximately 100 of the Mexican nationals had been transferred to


43
the Salinas guayule project. To date, the Forestry Service has been thoroughly satisfied with the work performed by most of these men.

The working conditions at the Salinas project call for payment of wages on the basis of 50¢ an hour, plus board and lodging. These wages are subject to periodic adjustment by the Forestry Service depending on the prevailing wage.

The use of this arrangement prior to the expiration of the original contract has essentially served a two-fold purpose:

  • (1) Permitted a retention of the Mexican men here for a necessary war crop, and the experimental use of workers in this now crop.
  • (2) Permitted a reasonable middle alternative between the two extremes of unsatisfactory sugar beet work and immediate repatriation.

44

PLANS FOR TRANSFER TO OTHER CROPS (including guayule) ON OR ABOUT DECEMBER 15, 1942

The plans for employment of that portion of the first group of 3000 Mexican workers who will remain in the United States after December 15, 1942 (approximately 2500) are in a state of flux, and it is extremely difficult to state exactly what crops these men will work in at the expiration of their present contracts.

First of all, it is possible that a number of the workers now in the United States will elect to return to Mexico on or about December 15. Furthermore, in connection with the renewal of individual work agreements, the Farm Security Administration will use this opportunity to terminate the contracts of any workers who have not proved to be satisfactory during their first employment period. At the present time, it appears that the Farm Security Administration will renew contracts with between 2000 and 2300 workers, if that number of workers should desire to remain in the United States. Before these contracts can be renewed, it is necessary that the U. S. Employment Service in Washington, D. C. notify the U. S. Immigration Service that these workers are needed for agricultural work in the United States. When the Immigration Service indicates that it will extend the expiration dates of the workers' permits of entry, the Farm Security Administration will be free to renew individual work agreements.

In all probability, the workers remaining in the United States


45
after December 15, 1942 will work in vegetables, citrus, general soil preparation, and, perhaps, guayule. It is not possible, at the present time, to give any accurate forecast on how many workers will be used in each of the above crops, as this entire matter is now in the process of negotiation.


46

RELATIONSHIPS WITH CALIFORNIA FIELD CROPS, INC.

There are four major sugar producers in California: Spreckels Sugar Company, Holley Sugar Company, American Crystal Sugar Company, and Union Sugar Company. Together these companies absorb the sugar beet production of California. In order to keep their refineries going, the sugar companies are vitally interested in the provision of labor for various activities in connection with the harvesting of the sugar beet itself. The growers of sugar beets in California contract their production with one of these sugar companies. The operations of the grower are closely watched by the sugar companies because the acreage planted, the crop practices, cultivation, and other factors have a definite bearing on the yield, and the yield in turn has a definite bearing on the amount of stock which will actually be produced by any one sugar company.

The functions performed in connection with the harvesting absorbs a considerable amount of labor. There are two mail seasons, the first, which takes place immediately subsequent to planting operations, consists in blocking and thinning; and the second, which takes place at the time sugar beets are harvested are colloquially known as loading and topping operations. Both operations absorb considerable amounts of field labor.

It became apparent to the sugar growers early in the Spring, and we must suppose that the basis for the supposition was the difficulty in obtaining labor for the blocking and thinning operations,


47
that they were going to experience considerable difficulty in obtaining sufficient labor for the harvest (loading and topping). The sugar companies therefore pooled their interests in regard to labor and established a corporation for the purpose of meeting the grower's labor problems. This corporation, known as California Field Crops, Inc., began operations early in 1942 and proceeded to bring its problems to the attention of the different authorities in Washington. Primarily, the objective of this corporation was to secure for the harvest operation of sugar beets in California, services of Mexican Nationals. Consequently, the discussions of the relationships of the employer group become a discussion of the Nationals and the California Field Crops, Inc.

Our first contact with California Field Crops, Inc., was in Washington subsequent to the time of the formulation of the international arrangement between Mexico and the United States on August 4, 1942. Mr. Roland C. Foerster of the firm of Morrison Hohfeld Foerster Sherman and Clark was in Washington at the time closely following the steps which were being taken toward solving the problem of putting into effect the international arrangement with Mexico.

It appeared early that two things would be necessary. First, some form of contractual relationship between Mexican Nationals and the United States Government, and secondly, some form of contractual relationship between the Government and the user of the labor of Mexican Nationals. Consequently, Mr. Foerster was exceedingly interested in the work which was being done in Washington by several


48
agencies, notably the Farm Security Administration, War Manpower Commission, and the Labor Management Committee of the War Production Board in deciding as to the form of contract between the Government and the employers would take. This contract known as a cooperative employment agreement was finally agreed upon between interested Government agencies. A copy of this agreement is attached.

The Chief representative of California Field Crops, Inc., was Mr. Earl Coke, General Manager of the California Field Crops, Inc. Upon Mr. Hewes' return to San Francisco on August 27, Mr. Coke and various officials of the sugar companies of standard beet growers, including Mr. Gordon Lyon, Executive Secretary of the sugar beet growers of Central California, visited the FSA office, and we discussed in general terms the provisions of the contract and the problems which would confront California Field Crops, Inc., in meeting the obligations set by the Government. Several other meetings were held subsequent to this first meeting. In general, the topics discussed were (1) housing of the workers, (2) feeding, (3) bond requirements to be met by California Field Crops, Inc., in connection with guarantee of performance, (4) workman's compensation insurance, (5) wages, (6) labor relations.

California Field Crops, Inc., indicated that they proposed to operate in the field by establishing field employees known as field representatives. These individuals were already performing similar functions inasmuch as they were field representatives of the various sugar companies. California Field Crops, Inc., through these field


49
representatives and to some extent, by reason of the contractual obligation existing between the sugar companies and the growers made their own individual arrangements between the growers for whom the Mexican Nationals were actually to work and California Field Crops, Inc.

It should be pointed out here that whatever success may have resulted from the transportation of the initial group of Mexican Nationals to do agricultural work in California was largely due to the careful planning by California Field Crops, Inc. It should also be borne in mind that the production of sugar beets is a highly integrated industry and that the growers and processors are more tightly connected than is generally true in other agricultural operations. Therefore, the California Field Crops, Inc., represented a much higher degree of responsibility than can be generally encountered in other lines of agricultural products.

California Field Crops, Inc., was in a position to negotiate with Farm Security Administration, to make decisions, to execute contracts, and to do all those things which are necessarily presupposed in the assuming of responsibility of contractual relations. In spite of the highly integrated and highly responsible position in which we found California Field Crops, Inc., a great many problems, some of them very serious, have developed in the actual working out of the program. It has been extremely difficult for the California Field Crops, Inc., to control its growers and one wonders just what the situation would be in more loosely organized industries.


50

California Field Crops, Inc., executed the cooperative employment agreement covering the first 1500 workers required by the Farm Security Administration under date of September 16, 1942, furnishing at the same time evidence of having procured surety bond in the amount of $100,000 and also employer's workmens' compensation liability surety. Under date of September 29, 1942, cooperative employment agreement covering an additional 1500 workers was executed and an additional bond in the amount of $100,000. These latter workers were included under Compensation policy.

Shortly after the first trainload of workers arrived on October 5, 1942, it became apparent that the workers were greatly dissatisfied with a number of conditions and they justly or unjustly took action in the form of filing complaints and work stoppage. It became necessary therefore to negotiate certain aspects of the contract with California Field Crops, Inc., the main difficulty arising out of the fact that the traditional piece work method as paid by sugar beet growers was not satisfactory to the Mexican workers. California Field Crops, Inc., through Mr. Earl Coke was willing to make certain concessions with regard to payment of the Mexican workers and the changes decided upon were put into effect in the first half of August in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valley Areas.

It should be said on behalf of California Field Crops, Inc., that they have shown every desire to carry out their contractual obligation and have worked assiduously towards the successful operation of the Mexican Farm Labor Transportation Program insofar as they


51
were affected by it. Although many problems have presented themselves, it must be said in justice that although several growers have been unwilling to meet standards required by the Government, that this is not due to any failure on the California Field Crops, Inc., officials to adjust such discrepancies. California Field Crops, Inc., has been uniformly cooperative, intelligent, and farsighted in the handling of various problems that have arisen. They have met their financial obligations to the Government promptly and in conformity with the procedure established. On the other hand, it has been extremely difficult for California Field Crops, Inc., to secure from the growers an accurate accounting of the wages earned by the Mexicans and although we have knowledge of the fact that the California Field Crops, Inc., has made every effort to prevail on the grower to make an accounting as required by the Farm Security Administration, very wide gaps are now evidenced which can only be attributed to the grower's carelessness in carrying out the small amount of simple record keeping required by this program. One unfortunate aspect of this failure is the requirement of the Mexican Government for 10% of the worker's wages be deducted and forwarded to the Mexican Government to be there held for the worker's account. The responsibility of making this deduction falls on the Farm Security Administration. The Farm Security Administration must maintain records based on actual earnings. The failure of the growers to maintain actual and accurate time and earnings statements, and the failure or the consequent inability of the sugar companies to provide these records in turn makes maintenance
52
by the Farm Security of its records extremely difficult. Inasmuch as an accounting has to be made by this Government to the Mexican Government, the only recourse which the Farm Security Administration will have if it is unable to make a reconciliation will be against California Field Crops, Inc., under the terms of the contract.


53

RELATIONS WITH MEXICAN OFFICIALS IN CALIFORNIA

Consular Offices of the Mexican Government in California in the area in which Mexican Nationals were transported to work in sugar beets are located at Sacramento, San Francisco, Fresno, and Los Angeles. The Mexican Nationals imported in sugar beets in the Sacramento-Stockton area were under the jurisdiction of the Consular Office at Sacramento. The Nationals in the lower Sacramento Delta, Stockton-San Jose area were under the jurisdiction of the Consular Office at San Francisco. Those in the Salinas Valley and King City were under the jurisdiction of the Consular Office at Fresno, and those in the Santa Barbara County were under the jurisdiction of the Consular Office at Los Angeles.

In addition, the Mexican Government sent along with the special trains carrying the Mexican Nationals, two inspectors of the Mexican Labor Department, Senor Martinez Morales Flores and Senor Arredondo Padilla. These two gentlemen and the Consular Officials of the staff of the above designated offices constituted the representatives of the Mexican Government with whom Farm Security Administration officials have dealt since the first trainload of Mexican workers arrived in the Sacramento-Stockton area, September 29, 1942.

Farm Security Administration officials and the Mexican officials have worked together harmoniously. The object of both sets of the officials was, namely, the protection of the interests of the Mexican Nationals and mediation of such problems as arose between them and


54
the grower-employer. The Consular Officials and the representatives of the Mexican Department of Labor have shown a great deal of intelligence in quickly and clearly apprehending the problems of labor relations and the problems of labor management arising in the harvesting of sugar beets. The distribution of consular territory has proven somewhat of a handicap due to the fact that the Fresno Consular Office does not find it easy to work in the Salinas, King City Area. Likewise, the San Francisco Regional Office of the Farm Security Administration has encountered difficulty in arranging quick and easy communications with the Mexican Consular Office at Los Angeles. However, these are merely matters of geographical and territorial adjustment and not personality.

For the first several weeks after the workers arrived, numerous delegates and workers came into San Francisco or into the other Consular Offices from considerable distances to bring to the attention of these officials grievances and complaints in connection with their work. The policies generally followed by the Consular officials was to get the men to return to work with the promise that their problems would be adjudicated by Farm Security if they would make proper representations to the Farm Security Administration in the neighborhood in which they worked.

The Consular officials experienced a very heavy over-burden of work during the first trying weeks after the workers had arrived. In general, the problem presented to these officials was to bring to our attention the grievances of their Nationals and to attempt to


55
get a settlement through our mediation with the growers. The problem presenting itself to Farm Security Administration as a result of these referrals was that of obtaining adjustment by again referring these problems through California Field Crops, Inc. In a good many instances these problems were adjusted, although some of them took an unduly long period of time to work out.

The general nature of the complaints was that the Mexican Nationals felt that they were being discriminated against because they were receiving wages on piece work rates and the beet fields in which they were expected to work were of poor quality, that is the beets were small, the fields weedy and not properly cultivated, and consequently on a piece work basis the prevailing wage set by the Secretary's Wage Board did not permit them to make adequate earnings.

A good many of these cases were settled by removing the workers to farms where the beets were better or where the growers were willing to use an hourly rate. However, on the other hand, in reviewing some of the complaints it became apparent that the workers were unfitted or unwilling to work in sugar beet harvesting. In some of these cases it was necessary to repatriate the individual. In a great many of these cases the Mexican Consular Offices were advised of the repatriation proceedings and in many cases took part in them. It can be said that the Mexican Consular officials were in agreement with every case of voluntary or involuntary repatriation. It should be noted, however, that almost all cases of repatriation were voluntary.


56

ATTITUDE OF THE MEXICAN OFFICIALS IN CALIFORNIA TOWARD FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

Our encounters with Mexican officials have been extremely pleasant. We have found them to be courteous, reasonable and assiduous in the protection of their Nationals. On the other hand, they have been realistic and intelligent in recognizing the conditions attendant upon agricultural wage labor in California are not too good, and that the present war conditions hamper any large-scale efforts to improve them. The Farm Security Administration was frank in its admission of the fact that the housing and living conditions in the growers' camps occupied by Mexican Nationals were a bare minimum but were the best that could be had under existing conditions. The Mexican officials and the Farm Security Administration alike, believe that unless vigorous action on behalf of the Mexican Nationals had not been taken, a good many of the Nationals would have returned home dissatisfied both with their work experience and their visit in the United States. This might have been a focal point for the dissemination of anti-United States sentiment. In their attempt to explain all these problems to the workers, the consul and labor department officials have done a great deal to make good relationships between the two countries. It is our belief that the officials of these agencies are aware of the integrity and the efforts of the Farm Security Administration and of the difficulties and problems faced by the Farm Security Administration during this difficult


57
and trying period. These Mexican officials have been very prompt and accurate in reporting conditions as they found them to their Central Office in Mexico City, and it can be assumed that the Mexican Government is in full possession of all the facts which these officials have observed.

SPECIAL CASES

It must be borne in mind that in transporting 3000 human beings from their homes, that a number of cases requiring individual care would occur. There have been up to the present time one accidental death, one death from natural causes, a large number of accidental injuries, and a considerable number of illnesses of more or less severe nature, and two cases of injuries involving five Mexican Nationals, caused by automobile accidents. There have also been a few cases of arrest for petty offenses and several cases where workers have left agriculture and gone into industry. One particular case involving the Mexican Consul at Los Angeles occurred in which some twelve Mexican Nationals left their King City and Stockton sugar beet employment and went to work in a warehouse in Los Angeles. In a number of these cases all that was necessary to do was to advise the proper Mexican Consular authority of the occurrences and to advise them of the limited extent of the Farm Security Administration authority so that there could be a clear delimitation of responsibility. In those cases where the question of personal damages arose, the Mexican Consul provided legal representation for the


58
Mexican Nationals with the view to protecting the rights of the injured person.

A final conclusion on this particular phase of the operations is that the Mexican Consular offices and the Mexican Government was not adequately staffed to undertake the solution of the myriad of problems that arose and consequently individual members of the Consular's staff carried a tremendous overburden of work. It is our feeling that since a large percentage of the work performed by these officials redounds to our benefit that some means should be found whereby the expense incident to providing adequate personnel to supplement those persons representing the Mexican Department of Labor and Mexican Consular's staff should be borne by the United States. It would have been impossible for the Farm Security Administration to have met its commitments and obligations to the Mexican Government or even to have secured performance on the part of the workers if it had not been for the very great assistance received from the Mexican Government here in the United States. It should be borne in mind that Mexican officials coming to the United States for official work were under the added handicap of the adverse exchange rates so that they have had to get along on an insufficient amount of funds as well as insufficient personnel. This resulted in handicaps, and personal hardship, all of which tended to create a far from comfortable position for the Mexican officials. It is recommended therefore that in any future transportation of the Mexican Nationals,


59
that some means be found in advance so that the United States can stand its full share of the costs of these services which directly redound to our advantage.


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EDUCATIONAL AND RECREATIONAL PROGRAM

The educational and recreational program was designed to provide the Mexican Nationals with recreational outlets and to assist them in developing, within reasonable bounds, their agricultural skills. The establishment of this agendum was done with the following considerations in mind: instruction in English so that the Mexican Nationals could orient themselves to their new surroundings and maintain cultural, recreational, and economic contacts with the people about them, and to teach them simple agricultural terms so that they could more readily assimilate courses in agricultural skills and techniques. In this latter phase of the program we are receiving the whole-hearted cooperation of the California State Department of Education through the Rural War Production Training Program. This program was established by Congress for providing vocational training to help achieve farm production goals designated by the Secretary of Agriculture. These courses were designed for out of school youths and adults, but through the cooperation of the Farm Security Administration and the United States Office of Education they were extended for the benefit of the Mexican Nationals.

The courses in English are being given through the cooperation of the California State Department of Education and local school boards. On the whole we have found most school boards to be very receptive to the idea of making their facilities available to the Mexican Nationals.


61

There are now 22 classes in progress at the following places:

  • Salinas
  •     4 classes
  • Sacramento
  •     3 classes
  • Chico
  •     2 classes
  • Hollister
  •     2 classes
  • Santa Maria
  •     2 classes
  • Thornton
  •     1 class
  • Tracy
  •     1 class
  • San Jose
  •     1 class
  • Colusa
  •     1 class
  • Gonzales
  •     1 class
  • Gilroy
  •     1 class
  • King City
  •     1 class
  • Davis
  •     1 class
  • Pleasanton
  •     1 class

Also preliminary arrangements have been completed for additional classes at:

  • Woodland
  •     Gilroy
  • Clarksburg
  •     Colusa
  • San Luis Obispo
  •     Imperial Valley (4 classes)
  • Salinas (at least 4 classes for the workers in guayule)
  •     

Approximately 900 Mexican Nationals are now attending these classes.

The main factor in preventing greater attendance is the lack of transportation. Many of the camps are located at great distances from schoolhouses, and because of the tire situation, many growers are adverse to using their trucks except during the working day. Several school boards have set an excellent precedent by extending the services of their school buses for transporting the Mexican Nationals to and from classes. Another factor that limits attendance is the physical condition of the men at the end of the day. After a long and hard day at work, which is still new to them, many men are not greatly interested in an educational program.


62

As an example of how these classes function, we mention the case of the Salinas night school. The first 40 minutes of the two-hour session is devoted to English instruction. The students are divided into small groups so that each one receives the benefit of some individual attention. The second 40 minute period is used for visual education in California crop activities. This is accompanied by an interpreter's lecture on the films and slides. The final 40 minutes is again devoted to English instruction. Those classes meet twice a week. This pattern is being followed in a number of schools.

The reaction of the Mexican Nationals is highly satisfactory. That their interest is genuine is eloquently attested to by the fact that class attendance is increasing steadily, and that requests for more classes come in continuously. This attitude of the Mexican Nationals has produced excellent results. At Hollister, California, which is in the heart of an area that has always been opposed to any programs for agricultural workers, the daily paper, the "Evening Free Lance" wrote: "Talking with the worker-students, this writer was impressed by the intelligence and interest shown by these men.....These men had put in a long day at field work, to which most of them had previously been unaccustomed; it was a cold, rainy evening, the classroom was none too warm, and they were all obviously tired; but their interest and eagerness to learn were inspiring."


63

A good example of how the Mexican Nationals are being received by cooperating school authorities is seen in the case of the North Sacramento Night School. Here the principal personally conducted the men through the building, explaining to them how the school functioned. He completed this introductory tour with a program of organ music.

The principal indicated that he would offer the men, film and musical programs and such sports as he could arrange. In order to make them feel at home, he is having them meet groups of other students.

The recreational activities have proven to be just as important in maintaining the morale of the Mexican Nationals on a high level. These activities take the form of group games such as soccer football, volley ball, baseball, and entertainments to which large numbers of the men are invited. A sample analysis of farm visit reports covering slightly more than half of the camp groups shows that the men have satisfactory recreational opportunities in 70 per cent of the total number.

The program of informal sports activities is somewhat hampered by the lack of equipment. In some instances, the men have brought some items for their own use. Contacts have been made with the Recreation Division of the Federal Security Agency. Through the sincere interest and wholehearted cooperation of Mr. Harry Stoops, and Mr. Cecil George of that agency, we may be able to obtain funds


64
for a recreation program under the Lanham Act. Through the efforts of these men it is almost assured that the California State Department of education will act as the needed sponsor. In this way we shall be able to obtain not only equipment, but trained recreation leaders. Once this program is under way in California, the same plan will be set up for the Mexican Nationals in Arizona. This recreation will also be available for any domestic workers under the jurisdiction of the Farm Labor Transportation Program.

Successful contacts were also made with the Motion Picture Society for the Americas, which is affiliated with the Office of Inter-American Affairs. This agency has made available for our use its extensive library of 16 mm sound films in Spanish. Plans are under consideration for the early exhibition of these films.

In order to round out the informal recreation program, efforts have been made to interest the growers in providing radio receivers in their camps. A number of them have already done this, and we hope eventually to have all our groups thus provided. We are also attempting to promote more local broadcasts of Spanish programs. At Chico, preliminary plans have been completed for a broadcast on which Mexican Nationals will appear.

A plan has been worked out with Señor Frausto of the Mexican Consulate in San Francisco whereby Mexican newspapers and periodicals will be distributed, shortly, to the camps by our field offices. Señor Frausto is completing arrangements to have this reading matter


65
sent here from Mexico City.

The entertainment program seems to have taken hold of communities, and the efforts put forth have been generously rewarded. With but slight encouragement, a number of communities have organized "fiestas" which as many as 600 Mexican Nationals have attended at one time. We have had outstanding successes at Chico, Sacramento, Thornton, Woodland, and other cities. In these programs, community groups such as councils of social agencies, chambers of commerce, women's clubs, service clubs, churches, etc., have acted as sponsors. One of the greatest successes was at Chico on November 7, when the community entertained a large group of Mexican Nationals. Here, civic leaders and the average citizens vied with each other in making the guests welcome. Addresses were delivered by the mayor, a representative of the Mexican Consulate in San Francisco, the secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, and others. A response was offered by one of the Mexican Nationals, thanking the community for its splendid manifestation of good will. The Chico Enterprise, which devoted slightly more than two full columns to the affair, reported in part: "Saturday night's reception was outstanding proof of a people's spontaneous good will, courtesy, and kindliness expressed by both nationalities, one to the other, with an life and informality that breeds solidarity.....The men are from all walks of life in their native country and the feeling they expressed.....individually to those who talked with them, was that.....they would leave with friendship and would carry that same


66
feeling home.....Equally happy about the success of the reception were the Chicans present, who threw formality to the winds and exerted every effort to extend hospitality to the Mexicans, who were receptive, interested guests and a spirit of good-fellowship carried throughout the evening".

At the Thornton Farm Security Administration Camp for farm workers, the Mexican Nationals have been invited to all the weekly dances and entertainments. Here they have made themselves well liked by the way they joined in the festivities. Their success at the camp's "amateur hour" is attested to by the fact that they have been winning a large share of the prizes, which are War Savings Stamps. A warm regard for each other has resulted from the close contact between the Mexican Nationals and the domestic farm workers.

The same sort of good-fellowship has been evident at all the "fiestas". Not a little of it is due to the way the Mexican Nationals entered into the spirit of things. They were not content to sit back and be entertained, but in all places have cheerfully participated in the entertainment. Mexican songs and music have become popular features of all these gatherings.

Besides the foregoing activities, communities also have become interested in the spiritual well-being of the Mexican Nationals. In many of them, arrangements have been made for special church services. Growers seem to have responded well to the desires of


67
the men for church attendance by providing transportation from outlying camps. The National Travelers Aid Society has generously offered its case-work services whenever required, and will be glad to aid us in finding emergency housing and meeting trains. Contacts have been had with the National Catholic Community Service with the result that staff members of the Catholic Charities, in the various communities in which we have placed Mexican Nationals, have been requested to land their assistance to us whenever possible.

The net result of our educational and recreational programs has been not only a bolstering of the morale of the Mexican Nationals, but also a definite factor in the creation of good-will between them and the communities in which they are working. The whole-hearted response of the workers to any friendliness shown them has been so stimulating to the communities that the latter have continued an increasing activity to do all they can for the Mexican Nationals. The way the men have joined in the programs, their eagerness to learn English, and their ability to do a good job, is winning them more friends daily. The general deportment of the Mexican Nationals, their courtesy, their consideration, and their good spirits came as a surprise to many who were inclined to belittle their status. These characteristics of the Mexican Nationals have gone a long way in bringing out the traditional friendliness of the local citizenry with the net result that the creation of good-will between the meeting groups has become a


68
reality rather than a vague ideal to be worked for.

The continuation of the present educational and recreational program on its present course cannot help but prove in the long run a vital factor in the firm cementing of the spirit of good-will, continued friendship, and greater understanding between the people of the United States and Mexico.


69

THE PRESS

On August 7, 1942, the War Manpower Commission announced publicly the organization of a Farm Labor Transportation program, to be administered by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and "managed by the Farm Security Administration in cooperation with State and county USDA War Boards and the U. S. Employment Service."

On August 20 the Department of Agriculture issued a national press release further outlining the Farm Labor Transportation program and mentioning that FSA was "working out operating details to bring in agricultural workers from Mexico."

In line with directives received by L. I. Hewes, Jr., FSA regional director at San Francisco, the Region IX Information Division on August 22 issued a press release announcing "the appointment of Henry A. McCarrie....to negotiate directly with growers' associations and other farm groups regarding transportation, distribution and importation of workers." This first news story was distributed region-wide.

On August 26, a radio script entitled "News About Transportation of Farm Labor" was broadcast on the USDA program "Western Agriculture." This 10-minute dialogue outlined working principles of the FLT program, mentioned the appointment of a Wage Board and the time of hearings, offered practical information to prospective employers of transported farm labor.

Two days later the Department of Agriculture published news


70
of the designation of L. I. Hewes, Jr., to direct the FSA's part in the Mexican phase of the FLT program. A regional release of this news was unnecessary, but the following day, August 29, the Region IX information Division followed up with a region-wide press release titled "FSA Will Set Up Labor Recruiting Offices in Mexico." This story announced the appointment by Mr. Hewes of Mr. H. P. Brown, to act for him in establishing headquarters at Mexico City, staffing field offices, etc. It anticipated the next steps to be taken in the FLT program, anticipated the time of arrival of the first Mexican workers, and explained the respective rules played in this program by Farm Security, U. S. Employment Service and War Manpower Commission.

On August 31 the Division released news of the California Wage Board hearing to be held that day in Sacramento, and with this lead again explained domestic and Mexican phases of farm labor transportation.

Mr. F. R. Soule, the regional information specialist, attended the wage hearings a few days later in Los Angeles. During his stay there he made public relations contacts with leaders of the Spanish-Speaking Congress, with the Mexican press, and with other agencies and friends of FSA in southern California.

By the middle of September arrangements were completed for transportation of 1500 Mexican Nationals to California for the sugar beet harvest. On September 21 the Information Division released a statement to all papers and wire services announcing the relevant facts, including train schedules, giving due credit to all agencies


71
and organizations concerned with the transaction.

The Division then made arrangements for coverage of the first arrivals at Stockton and Sacramento by the press, and in particular by all newsreel companies. Mr. Soule and his associate Mr. E. S. Albee went to Sacramento and Stockton respectively. At both cities they assisted the newsreel cameramen, LIFE and TIME photographers and newspapermen in their work, and provided them with printed and verbal information. The desired coverage was thoroughgoing.

On September 25 another script on up-to-date facts about the FLT program was broadcast on "Western Agriculture."

On September 29 a press story with the self-explanatory title "FSA Chief Lauds Mexico For Farm Labor Cooperation" was issued.

On October 3 a general news story recounted the arrival of the first 500 Mexicans, announced the time of further arrivals, and emphasized the international significance and similar aspects of this program.

About October 1 a press conference was called for the regional director, at which San Francisco newspapers, wire services and the McClatchy newspaper chain were represented. Mr. Hewes detailed the process by which Mexican workers were selected at Mexico City, and discussed the FLT program generally with emphasis on the cooperation of the Mexican government. The Information Division followed this conference up immediately with a supplemental news release to the regional press.

It may be noted here that all major stories and articles about


72
the FLT program, including the story last mentioned, have been sent to all field offices of the Farm Security Administration in Region IX, in order that personnel might be kept informed and able to answer questions. With this help, field FSA officers have been able to issue local press releases and take part in radio interviews.

In addition to routine mailings from time to time, on November 9 each administrative employee was sent a complete kit of major releases and pamphlets.

On October 10, and again on October 15, press releases were issued to announce further arrivals of Mexican workers to complete a California quota of 3000 men, and as usual, various significant phases of the transportation program were included in the stories.

A special public relations job was performed as a sequel to the Farm Bureau meeting at Casa Grande, Arizona, on October 13. This meeting attacked the Farm Security Administration on several counts, mostly on the basis of misunderstanding or misrepresentation of the FLT program. Upon the request of the editor of the Casa Grande Dispatch for a counter statement, a lengthy reply was prepared for Mr. Hewes. It was printed verbatim in the next issue of the Dispatch. A condensed version of the statement was also printed in The Arizona Farmer on November 21.

On October 30, a round-table broadcast prepared in cooperation with the Office of War Information was presented on "Western Agriculture." This 14-minute discussion featured Mr. Hewes, John Cooter of the U. S. Employment Service, Earl Coke, General Manager


73
of California Field Crops, Inc., and Gordon Lyons, Secretary-manager of the Central California Beet Growers Association.

The following day another 15-minute round-table broadcast was presented over the NBC Pacific Coast Network. The script was prepared partly on the basis of the previous day's material, and brought into discussion Mr. Hewes, Mr. Coke, Mr. Lyons and the Mexican Consul at San Francisco, Senor Antonio L. Schmidt.

Charges made by certain individuals to the effect that the Mexican workers brought to California beet fields were unskilled "city slum boys" were answered in a general press release on November 3. The story recounted the true details of the selection process as complete rebuttal of this accusation.

On November 5 a press release with the self-explanatory title, "Long Staple Growers Can Get FSA Loans to Pay Labor Costs" was issued to Arizona papers.

On November 17 the completion of arrangements to bring Mexican workers into the Imperial Valley of California was announced to the press. At this time the Regional Information Specialist spent a week in the Imperial district and at Los Angeles, carrying on public relations work with interested organizations and individuals.

Prepared at this writing is a "Western Agriculture" script, for broadcast on November 27. The talk describes the educational and entertainment program for Mexican workers in California now being carried on very successfully through cooperation of FSA and local citizens and organizations, emphasizing the improved international


74
friendship promoted by these activities. Concrete data on the sugar production achieved thanks to the Mexican Nationals is included.

The Information Division made contacts with editors in several parts of central California where Mexican beet labor was to be employed explaining the fundamental conditions and purposes of the program. As a result some ten or twelve editorials were printed by representative newspapers emphasizing the aspects of international relations and neighborly good will and recommending that public policy support the changed attitude toward the employment of Mexican workers on the farms in this country.

It can be stated that the reaction of the press and radio to the Mexican Farm Labor Program in California has been generally favorable. With the exception of one or two instances in which the press reported local difficulties in and around Santa Maria, California, there have been no unfavorable reports. Local newspapers in the areas where the workers are employed have carried excellent stories about the workers and the Program. Public reaction to the Program is favorable in those areas where the Program is operating, and it is anticipated that if the Program is spread to additional areas much of the misunderstanding and antagonism which certain misinformed groups have manifested will tend to disappear.


75

AN OVERALL EVALUATION

An overall evaluation of the program for the transportation of Mexican farm workers is difficult while we are still in the midst of operating the initial employment period of the program. On the basis of the various phases of the program which have been covered in the preceding sections of the report, certain generalizations, however, may be hazarded [sic].

The procedure for selecting workers in Mexico City has been proven to be practical and efficient. Once the staff is assembled and the signal given to commence selection, it has been demonstrated that between 200 and 300 workers can be "processed" per day. The quality of workers depends on, and is protected by the Mexican government, the selection crew and the representative of the grower-employer group. Particular stress should be laid on the importance of having the grower-employer representative present during the selection process.

Transportation of workers from Mexico to the point of destination in the United States was handled efficiently by the Farm Security Administration, and with a remarkable absence of mishap. In almost every instance, the transportation crews did an excellent job of grouping the workers on the train so that upon arrival the workers were handled skillfully. The scarcity of cars on the Mexican side of the border has proven to be a definite limiting factor affecting the rate at which workers can be transported to the United States.


76

Housing has been a source of considerable discussion. On the one hand the Farm Security Administration has been accused of demanding luxurious quarters for Mexican workers, while on the other hand the charge has been made that Mexican workers have been housed in bunkhouses unfit for use. Farm Security Administration standards have been practical and realistic. No one believes that the housing certified by the Farm Security Administration is for the most part "good" housing. We do know that this housing meets the standards set by the State of California, and that it is not inferior to housing available to domestic workers. We also know that as a result of our inspections, the quality of growers' housing has been improved, particularly in regard to matters of sanitation. One serious problem encountered was that housing certified in September as satisfactory was not entirely satisfactory when the rainy season set in at the end of November; the importance of careful consideration of changes in weather will be noted in connection with housing certification in the future.

The program of medical care furnished to Mexican Nationals by the Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association proved satisfactory, with the only serious problem being that encountered in getting ill workers from their ranch to a physician's office. This problem is however inherent in any rural medical program.

The wisdom of requiring that the grower-employer cover all workers with Workmen's Compensation is evidenced by the number of compensable injuries occurring during the first 6 weeks. One problem


77
needing further consideration is that of financial support for the injured worker during the period between the occurrence of the injury and the receipt of compensation.

The problem of wages is of course central to any contract for employment. In the case of Mexican Nationals working in sugar beets, the crux of our difficulties lay in the existence of a tonnage basis of pay, which the worker could not understand, and which seemed to many workers discriminatory in view of the fact that many domestic workers were paid on an hourly basis by contractors who were themselves paid on a tonnage scale. We do not believe that piece work or a tonnage basis will ever prove satisfactory to Mexican Nationals because of the difficulty of determining in advance, or at least immediately at the conclusion of each day's work, exactly what a man has earned. In regard to this first group of Mexican workers in sugar beets, rightly or wrongly the figure of 65 cents became firmly imbedded in their heads at the beginning of the employment period, and no amount of discussion could dislodge this. It was virtually impossible to explain that the Wage Board had established a tonnage basis of pay as the prevailing basis; but that the Wage Board has also said that if hourly rates are paid, it would be mandatory to pay 65 cents per hour; and then to explain further that the Wage Board believed that only the worker of unusually ability (and not the worker of average ability) could earn the equivalent of 65 cents an hour working on the tonnage basis. Another serious problem in relation to wages was the appearance of wide departures


78
from the "prevailing" wage scale, thus invalidating discussions about an actual prevailing wage.

Mediation on an informal basis has been a continuous process. Members of the Management Division field staff have been engaged in a non-stop program of adjustment of difficulties ever since the first group of workers arrived. Well planned and regular farm visits are essential in developing a program of mediation which can do much to avoid crises before they arise. However, once these difficulties have arisen, informal adjustment is necessary. The record of informal mediation carried on by Farm Security Administration field men is one of which the Agency may well be proud.

Formal complaints and hearings, as distinguished from Mediation have provided a method for formal action leading either to repatriation or to transfer of workers to another employer. The established machinery, operated by the Labor Relations Division, has functioned successfully in settling complaints, transferring workers to other employers, and providing the factual basis for repatriation where requested either by the worker, the employer association, or the Farm Security Administration.

Repatriation has proven to be a necessary procedure to be used when all attempts at adjustment have failed. The record of 165 repatriations during the first seven weeks out of a total of 3004 workers transported to the United States is eloquent testimony of the excellence of the original selection process and the Farm Security's mediation machinery.


79

The problem of Missing Workers is an inevitable part of a farm labor transportation program. As long as there is a general shortage of labor both in agriculture and industry, with the accompanying discrepancies in wages between agriculture and industry, and higher wages in some types of agriculture than in others, just so long will workers transported either by the domestic program or from Mexico be missing and disappear. It is a wonder that more workers are not missing; and as the employment period draws to a close it is possible that the number of workers missing will increase because of opportunities for other employment in the United States.

In an overall evaluation, reference should be made to the existence of an alternate employment possibility, such as guayule. The fact that we were able to offer employment in guayule to a small number of workers provided the means by which workers could be put to work who found, after trying, that they could not do the work in sugar beets. The opportunity of transfer to guayule was only given to those workers who, after making a genuine effort to work in sugar beets, were found to be unable to do the latter type of work. Initial experience with guayule indicates that Mexican Nationals are good workers in this type of work, and that both the workers and the Forest Service are pleased with the arrangement.

Relations with California Field Crops, Inc., have been cordial and business-like. Officials of California Field Crops, Inc., have set a high standard of performance and dependability in their dealings with the Farm Security Administration. One problem which may


80
become serious at the close of the employment period is that arising from the failure of certain growers and sugar companies to use the Work Tickets designed to keep accurate records of hours worked, and wages paid. In a program such as this it is essential that the grower-employer association employ a staff to assist growers in maintaining records.

Relations with Mexican officials in California have been exceedingly cordial. It can truthfully be said that the excellent cooperation and extraordinary labors of the Mexican Consular officials and the representatives of the Mexican Department of Labor have been an essential part of the success of the Mexican Farm Labor Transportation Program.

The place of an Education and Recreation program in this entire venture may be, unthinkingly at first, questioned. However, anyone familiar with Mexican workers and with the individual and group problems involved in bringing a group of 3000 single workers to a strange country cannot help but realize the extent to which an education and recreation program forms an integral part of any pattern of success. Education and recreation are connected with this program not for the purpose of providing frills, but rather to meet a real, and deeply felt need of the workers. Education and Recreation prove to the workers, in case proof is necessary, that we regard them as human beings capable of expressing themselves joyfully and desirous of taking advantage of educational opportunities. The fact that the workers know that they are so regarded by the government of


81
the United States is an important ingredient in their attitude toward the government, their "patron." It is also an important item in the relationships between the governments of the United States and the Republic of Mexico.

In conclusion, we refer to our statement at the beginning of this section to the effect that an overall evaluation cannot be made in the midst of actual operations. It can be said, and we believe it should be said, that to date, in spite of varied, continued, and novel problems, the Mexican Labor Program has proven to be successful not only in saving the sugar beet crop, but also in laying the foundations for a workable pattern of agricultural labor relations.

APPENDIX


1

Exhibit A: Individual Work Agreement

INDIVIDUAL WORK AGREEMENT

Nombre—Name_________________________

entered into between the Government of the United States of America acting by and through the Farm Security Administration of the Department of Agriculture, hereinafter referred to as the "Patron", and_________________________ a Mexican laborer hereinafter referred to as the "Worker".

DECLARATIONS

1. The Government of the United States and the Worker mutually desire that the Worker be beneficially employed in the United States of America with a view to alleviate the present shortage of agricultural workers in that country and to cooperate in the successful prosecution of the war.

2. The Worker declares that he is a Mexican national by birth, domiciled at _________________________, ____ years of age, _________________________ (married or single).

3. The Farm Security Administration of the Department of Agriculture of the United States of America is represented in the execution of this contract, by Mr. _________________________, _________________________ who has established his authority to the satisfaction of the Mexican authorities.

4. The Worker satisfies the physical requirements for fulfilling this agreement, as evidenced by the attached certificate issued by the duly authorized officers of the Department of Health of Mexico and the United States Public Health Service. The Patron admits that such requirements have been met to its satisfaction, in view of which it agrees that this agreement may not be terminated due to the physical condition of the Worker or to any change in such condition that may occur during the period of employment; but the Patron may terminate the agreement immediately upon finding that the Worker is suffering from a heart, mental or venereal disease or has a chronic condition not contracted during or as a result of his employment in the United States, or if he has a contagious disease discovered while traveling from the point of origin to his destination in the United States.

5. The Patron agrees to enter into agreements with the proprietor or administrator (hereinafter referred to as the Employer) of the farm or farms in the United States of America, upon which the Worker will work, under terms guaranteeing him proper compliance with the terms of this agreement, it being understood that the Patron will be responsible to the Worker and to the Mexican Government for such compliance.

THIS WORK AGREEMENT IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS:

1. The Worker will be employed exclusively in agricultural work.

2. The Worker will receive the same wages as those paid to other workers in the area of employment for similar work. Said wages will in no event be less than $ 0.30 (American currency) per hour. The computation of wages, according to the custom in the United States, covers any payment which may be due for the seventh day, as required by the Federal Labor Law of Mexico. Rates for piece work will be so determined that a worker of average ability will earn the prevailing wage established in the area of employment.

3. The Patron agrees that its representatives or agents will inform the Worker at the beginning of his work and as frequently thereafter as may be necessary, using the Spanish language in an adequate manner, concerning the wage rates to which he is entitled, and the housing conditions, medical attention and other facilities to which he is entitled by virtue of the provisions of this agreement.

4. No deductions will be made from the wages of the Worker for commissions, fees or any other purpose (except as required by law) which will have the effect of reducing his wages below that provided for by Paragraph 2.

5. The Worker agrees that ten per cent (10%) of his wages may be deducted and authorizes the Patron to receive such amount from the Employer and to place it on deposit, to be refunded to him on his return to his place of origin, or as soon as practicable, in the form of credits to his account in the Agricultural Credit Bank of Mexico.

6. The Worker accepts transportation, food, lodging, subsistence and work under the terms of this agreement and will execute all documents, receipts or instruments which the Patron may require in connection with this agreement.

7. The Patron will furnish to the worker and to the members of his family named on the reverse side of this agreement, sanitary facilities and medical care identical to those enjoyed by other agricultural workers in the same area of employment.

8. The Patron, at its expense, will transport or arrange for the transportation of the Worker and the members of his family named on the reverse side of this agreement and not in excess of 35 kilos (77 pounds) of personal effects for each member of the family which shall not include household goods) from _________________________, Mexico, to the point or points of destination within the United States where the Patron has determined the work will be performed, and return to point of origin.

9. The Patron will furnish to the Worker and to the members of his family accompanying him all necessary food, medical care and subsistence needs during periods of travel.

10. The Patron will make all arrangements necessary under the laws for the entry and exit of the Worker and members of his family accompanying him, to and from the United States.

11. The Worker shall work from the day following his arrival at the point of destination in the United States until _________________________

12. The Worker will perform all work required of him with proper application, care and diligence during the term of this agreement under the direction and supervision of the employers but he will not be required to work on Sundays.

13. This agreement may be renewed upon its termination upon the express consent of the Worker and with the knowledge of the Mexican Government.

14. In the event the Patron should desire to utilize the services of a member of the family of the Worker, he may do so only with the full consent of the Worker and of the person whose services are desired, by the execution of a similar agreement in the presence of the Regional Director of the Farm Security Administration or his representative and with the previous consent of the appropriate Mexican Consul.

15. Any member of the family under 14 years of age shall have the right to the same schooling as that received by children of other agricultural laborers in the area of employment in which the Worker may be working at any given time.

16. The Worker shall not be required to purchase articles or services for consumption or use by him or his family in any establishment not of his own choice.

17. The Worker will not be subject to discrimination in employment because of race, creed, color or nationality, in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 8802 of the President of the United States, dated June 25, 1941.

18. Food, lodging, medical and sanitary services and other indispensable articles furnished to the Worker and to members of his family by the Patron or any Employer shall meet the reasonable minimum standards approved by the Patron.

19. The Worker shall enjoy, as regards occupational diseases and accidents, the same guarantees enjoyed by other agricultural workers under the laws of the United States of America.

20. The Worker designates the following persons as his economic dependents _________________________ (names and addresses), whom he designates as the beneficiaries of the sums and indemnities to which he would be entitled under the Law and this agreement.

21. In the event the Worker should not be employed during the term of this agreement, as specified in Paragraph 11, such unemployment not being caused by his refusal to work or illness, 75% of the time for which he was contracted, the Patron will pay him $ 3.00 (American currency) per day for each day that he is not employed up to 75% of the work-days, which amount will be paid to him upon the termination of this agreement. If during his unemployment the Worker and members of his family are unable, upon the determination of the Patron, to supply their subsistence needs, he will receive necessary food, lodging, medical care and other subsistence needs. For the purpose of this paragraph, a day upon which the Worker works less than eight hours will not be considered a workday, and the hours worked on such days may be totalled, to determine the period of unemployment, in accordance with the procedure followed for other agricultural workers.

22. In the event there should be an increase in the cost of living in the United States, the terms of the preceding paragraph will be subject to reconsideration, in accordance with the understanding between the Governments of Mexico and the United States.

23. The Worker shall have the right to join with other Mexican laborers admitted under the understanding between the Governments of Mexico and the United States in the election of representatives to negotiate with the Patron or employers, such representatives to be members of the group electing them.

24. All disputes between the Worker and his employer or employers shall be resolved through mediation, according to procedures established by the Government of the United States for agricultural workers.

25. The Worker represents and warrants that he knows of no reason which would prevent him or his family from leaving or returning to Mexico, or entering or leaving the United States, as contemplated by this agreement. If the Worker or a member of his family shall not be permitted to leave Mexico or enter the United States, the Patron shall, at its expense, return the Worker and his family to their place of origin in Mexico. If after entrance into the United States the Worker or any member of his family becomes subject to deportation or removal therefrom under the Immigration or other laws of that country, or if the Farm Security Administration decides, after hearing the defense of the Worker, that the latter is unable or unwilling to work in accordance with the provisions of this agreement, or if the Worker or any member of his family violates any law of the United States, this agreement may forthwith and without notice be terminated by the Patron. Upon the termination of this agreement or upon the expiration of the period of employment provided for in paragraph 11, the Worker and his family shall immediately return to their place of origin in Mexico, at the expense of the Patron. If the Worker or any member of his family refuses so to return, the Patron may cause the Worker and his family to be removed to their place of origin.

26. All rights, privileges and powers conferred by this agreement upon the Government of the United States shall be exercised by the Administrator of the Farm Security Administration of the Department of Agriculture of the United States or by its duly authorized representative.

Executed at Mexico, D. F., this _________________________ day of _________________________ 194__

                             
El Trabajador—Worker.  Los Estados Unidos de América—United States of America. 
_________________________ Por—By _________________________ 
_________________________ 
Título Oficial—Official Title. 
FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
Aprobado—Approved. 
Por—By _________________________ 
FAMILIARES: 
Nombres—Names.  Domicilio—Residence. 
_________________________  _________________________ 
_________________________  _________________________ 
_________________________  _________________________ 
_________________________  _________________________ 
_________________________  _________________________ 

CONTRATO INDIVIDUAL DE TRABAJO

Número—Number_________________________

que celebran el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de América por conducto de la "Farm Security Administration" del Departamento de Agricultura, y que en el cuerpo del mismo se denominará "El Patrón", y el trabajador mexicano._________________________ a quien en el cuerpo del mismo se denominará "El Trabajador".

DECLARACIONES

1a El Gobierno de los Estados Unidos y el Trabajador mutuamente desean que el trabajador se emplee ventajosamente en los Estados Unidos de América con el objeto de resolver la presente escasez de trabajadores agrícolas en ese país y para coadyuvar en el éxito de la guerra.

2a El trabajador declara ser de nacionalidad mexicana por nacimiento, con domicilio en _________________________ de ____ años de edad _________________________ (casado o soltero)

3a La Farm Security Administration del Departamento de Agricultura de los Estados Unidos de América está representada, en la celebración de este contrato, por el señor _________________________ quien acredita su personalidad a satisfacción de las autoridades mexicanas.

4a El Trabajador reune las condiciones físicas necesarias para el cumplimiento del presente contrato, según la constancia expedida por los funcionarios debidamente autorizados de los Departamentos de Salubridad de México y de los Estados Unidos, que se anexa. El patrón reconoce a su satisfacción que se ha cumplido con tal requisito por lo cual acepta que el contrato no puede terminarse en atención a las condiciones físicas del trabajador o debido a cualesquiera cambios que pudieran presentarse en ellas durante el período de empleo; pero el Patrón puede dar por terminado el contrato en el momento en que se descubra que el Trabajador está enfermo del corazón, enajenación mental, padecimientos venéreos o crónicos que no fueron adquiridos durante, o como resultado de su trabajo en los Estados Unidos, o que padece alguna enfermedad contagiosa que se descubra en el trayecto entre el lugar de origen y el punto de destino en los Estados Unidos.

5a El Patrón se obliga a celebrar contratos con el propietario o administrador (a quien se denominará el Sub-Empleador) de la finca o fincas de los Estados Unidos de América, en las que prestará sus servicios el Trabajador, en los términos que garanticen para éste, la debida observancia de las cláusulas del presente contrato; entendiéndose que el Patrón será responsable, ante el trabajador y ante el Gobierno Mexicano, de tal cumplimiento.

EL PRESENTE CONTRATO DE TRABAJO SE
SUJETARÁ A LAS SIGUIENTES CLÁUSULAS:

1a El trabajador prestará sus servicios exclusivamente en labores agrícolas.


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2a El Trabajador devengará salario igual al que se paga a los demás trabajadores, en la región respectiva por trabajos similares. En ningún caso dicho salario será inferior a 0.30 de dólar por hora. El señalamiento de salarios segáa la costambre de los Estados aaidos iaclaye el pago del séptimo día, establecido por la Ley Federal del Trabajo de México. Los salarios por trabajos a destajo se arreglaráa ea forma tal qae el Trabajador de habilidad comáa disfrate del salario establecido ea la regióa.

3a El patróa se obliga a qae sas represeataates o ageates haráa del coaocimieato del Trabajador, al iaiciar éste la prestacióa de sas servicios y caaatas veces sea aecesario, empleaado el idioma castellaao y ea forma eficaz, caál es el salario qae le correspoade y caáles soa las coadicioaes de habitacióa, asisteacia médica y demás facilidades a qae tieae derecho por virtad de los térmiaos del preseate coatrato.

4a ao se haráa descaeatos al salario del Trabajador por comisioaes, caotas o por caalqaiera otra razóa, (excepto los reqaeridos por la ley) qae tieadaa a redacir los iagresos del mismo a caatidad iaferior a la meacioaada ea la cláasala segaada.

5a El Trabajador maaifiesta sa coaformidad para qae le sea descoatado de sa salario el DIEZ POR CIEaTO, y aatoriza al Patróa para recibirlo del Sab-Empleador y coaservarlo ea calidad de depósito para serle reiategrado a sa regreso al paato de origea, o taa proato como sea practicable, ea forma de créditos a sa caeata ea el Baaco de Crédito Agrícola de México.

6a El Trabajador acepta el traasporte, alimeatos, alojamieato, medios de sabsisteacia y trabajo ea los térmiaos del preseate coatrato y formalizará todos los arreglos, recibos e iastrameatos qae para el camplimieato de este coatrato padiera aecesitar el Patróa.

7a El Patróa proporcioaará al Trabajador y a los familiares de éste qae se seãalea ea el reverso del preseate coatrato, servicios saaitarios y ateacióa médica, todo ello ea idéaticas coadicioaes a las qae disfratea los demás trabajadores agrícolas ea la regióa de trabajo respectiva.

8a El Patróa, a sa costa, traasportará o gestioaará el traasporte del Trabajador y de los miembros de sa familia meacioaados ea el reverso de este coatrato y hasta 35 ailos (77 libras) de objetos de aso persoaal para cada aao de ellos, (los qae ao iaclairáa meaaje de casa) desde _________________________ México, hasta el lagar o lagares de los Estados aaidos ea qae, segáa determiaacióa del Patróa, se desempeãará el trabajo, y regreso al paato de origea.

9a El Patróa proporcioaará al Trabajador y sas familiares qae lo acompaãaa el alimeato, ateacióa médica y todos los medios de sabsisteacia aecesarios daraate el trayecto.

10a El Patróa hará todos los arreglos aecesarios coaforme a las leyes para la eatrada y salida del Trabajador y de sas familiares qae lo acompaãaa, al territorio de los Estados aaidos.

11a El Trabajador iaiciará la prestacióa de sas servicios desde el día sigaieate de sa llegada al paato de destiao ea los Estados aaidos hasta _________________________

12a El Trabajador desempeãará el trabajo qae se le reqaiera coa la iateasidad, caidado y esmero apropiados, daraate el período del coatrato bajo la direccióa y sapervisióa del Sab-Empleador y ao se le obligará a trabajar los domiagos.


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13a El preseate coatrato paede ser reaovado a sa veacimieato, mediaate la volaatad expresa del trabajador y coa coaocimieato del Gobierao Mexicaao.

14a Ea el caso de qae el Patróa preteadiera atilizar los servicios de algaaos de los familiares del Trabajador, sólo podrá hacerlo mediaate el coaseatimieato expreso de éste y de la persoaa cayos servicios seaa solicitados, celebraado el coatrato respectivo aate el Director Regioaal de la Farm Secarity Admiaistratioa o sa represeataate y previa aatorizacióa del Cóasal de México qae correspoada.

15a Caalqaier miembro de la familia meaor de 14 aãos de edad teadrá derecho a recibir la misma iastraccióa escolar qae se imparte a los aiãos de otros trabajadores agrícolas ea la regióa ea qae el trabajador esté trabajaado, ea caalqaier tiempo dado.

16a El Trabajador ao estará obligado a comprar artícalos o servicios para sa coasamo o aso, o el de sa familia ea aiagáa establecimieato qae ao sea de sa agrado.

17a El Trabajador ao será objeto de discrimiaacióa ea el trabajo a caasa de raza, credo, color o aacioaalidad, de acaerdo coa las estipalacioaes de la Ordea Ejecativa aa 8802 del Presideate de los Estados aaidos, fechada el 25 de jaaio de 1941.

18a El alimeato, alojamieato, servicios médicos y saaitarios y otros artícalos iadispeasables proporcioaados al Trabajador y sa familia, por el Patróa o algáa Sab-Empleador, cabriráa los staadards míaimos razoaables aprobados por el Patróa.

19a El Trabajador gozará, por lo qae hace a eafermedades profesioaales y accideates de trabajo, de las mismas garaatías qae disfrataa los demás trabajadores agrícolas, de acaerdo coa la legislacióa de los Estados aaidos de América.

20a El Trabajador seãala como sas depeadieates ecoaómicos a las sigaieates persoaas _________________________ (aombres y domicilios) a qaieaes desigaa como beaeficiarios de las iademaizacioaes qae a aqaél le correspoadieraa por caalesqaier coaceptos emaaados de la Ley y de este coatrato.

21a Para el caso de qae el Trabajador permaaezca desocapado daraate el período de la coatratacióa, segáa lo seãalado ea la cláasala 11a y siempre qae la desocapacióa ao sea motivada por sa aegativa a trabajar o por eafermedad, daraate el 75% del térmiao para el qae haya sido coatratado, el patróa le cabrirá 3.00 dólares diarios, qae le seráa pagados al fiaalizar el térmiao del coatrato. Si daraate la desocapacióa el trabajador y sas familiares ao paedea satisfacer sas aecesidades de vida, recibirá, previa comprobacióa del Patróa, los alimeatos aecesarios, alojamieato, ateacióa médica y demás medios de sabsisteacia. Para los efectos de esta cláasala, se coasiderará como día ao trabajado aqael ea qae el Trabajador labore meaos de ocho horas, y las horas trabajadas se compataráa, para calcalar el período de desempleo, de acaerdo coa el procedimieato segaido para los demás trabajadores agrícolas.

22a Ea caso de qae haya aameato del costo de la vida ea los Estados aaidos, lo pactado ea la cláasala aaterior será motivo de recoasideracióa, de acaerdo coa el coaveaio celebrado eatre los Gobieraos de México y los Estados aaidos.

23a El Trabajador teadrá derecho a asociarse coa otros trabajadores mexicaaos admitidos de coaformidad


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coa el acaerdo celebrado eatre los Gobieraos de México y los Estados aaidos, para elegir a sas represeataates qae tratea coa el Patróa o los sab-empleadores, debieado ser dichos represeatates miembros del grapo qae los desigaa.

24a Todas las dispatas eatre el Trabajador y sabempleador o sabempleadores seráa resaeltas por mediacióa, segáa el procedimieato establecido por el Gobierao de los Estados aaidos para los demás trabajadores agrícolas.

25a El Trabajador maaifiesta y asegara ao teaer coaocimieatos de motivo algaao qae paeda impedirle a él o a sa familia salir de o regresar a México, o iateraarse ea o salir de los Estados aaidos coa arreglo al preseate coaveaio. Si al Trabajador o algáa miembro de sa familia se le aiega la salida de México o la eatrada ea los Estados aaidos, el Patróa procarará qae el trabajador y sa familia retoraea a sa lagar de procedeacia ea México, a expeasas de aqaél. Si despaés de iateraarse ea los Estados aaidos el Trabajador o caalqaier miembro de sa familia se expoae a la deportacióa o remocióa de aqael país, coa arreglo a la Ley de Iamigracióa, o demás leyes, o si la Farm Secarity Admiaistratioa resaelve despaés de haber oído la defeasa del Trabajador, qae éste está iacapacitado para o se aiega a trabajar coaforme a los reqaisitos del preseate coaveaio, o si el Trabajador o caalqaier miembro de sa familia iafriage caalqaiera ley de los Estados aaidos, el preseate coaveaio paede iamediatameate y sia previo aviso darse por termiaado por parte del Patróa. Al termiaar el coaveaio o al expirar el período de empleo especificado ea la cláasala 11a, el Trabajador y sa familia retoraaráa ea el acto a sa lagar de procedeacia ea México, a costa del Patróa. Caaado el Trabajador o caalqaier miembro de sa familia se aiegae a retoraar ea estas coadicioaes, el Gobierao de los Estados aaidos paede remover al Trabajador y a sa familia al referido lagar de procedeacia.

26a Todos los derechos, privilegios y facaltades coaferidos por el preseate coaveaio al Gobierao de los Estados aaidos seráa ejercitados por el Admiaistrador de la Farm Secarity Admiaistratioa, por el Departmeato de Agricaltara de los Estados aaidos, o por sa represeataate debidameate aatorizado.

México, D. F., a ____ de _________________________ de 194___

                             
El Trabajador—Woraer.  Los Estados aaidos de América—aaited States of America. 
_________________________ Por—By _________________________ 
_________________________ 
Título Oficial—Official Title. 
FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
Aprobado—Approved. 
Por—By _________________________ 
FAMILIARES: 
Nombres—Names.  Domicilio—Residence. 
_________________________  _________________________ 
_________________________  _________________________ 
_________________________  _________________________ 
_________________________  _________________________ 
_________________________  _________________________ 


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Exhibit B: Mexican Nationals Transported from Mexico City to California by Farm Security Administration

                                     
Section Area  Train Number  Number Moved  Departure Date  Destination These are towns and cities in the work area where transported workers leave the train. The workers may be employed not only in the railhead county but in several surrounding counties.  Crops Harvested  Housing 
Mexico City  290  Sept. 25  Stockton, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  211  Sept. 25  Sacramento, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  58  Sept. 30  Guadalupe, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  182  Sept. 30  King City, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  378  Sept. 30  Salinas, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  242  Oct. 2  Stockton, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  507  Oct. 2  Sacramento, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  107  Oct. 8  Guadalupe, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  65  Oct. 8  King City, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  141  Oct. 8  Salinas, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  62  Oct. 8  Stockton, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  201  Oct. 8  Sacramento, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  167  Oct. 13  Stockton, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  346  Oct. 13  Sacramento, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Mexico City  47  Oct. 21  Stockton, Calif.  Sugar Beets  Growers 
Total  3004 
November 11, 1942 


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Exhibit C: [Workers Transported by Farm Security Administration]

District: STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA

Sugar Company: HOLLY SUGAR CORPORATION

J.S.

TRAIN No. 1

                 
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
25  30  G. S. Rosenberger Camp #15  Venice Island, 2½ mi. N from Venice ferry  O.K. with general cleaning and minor repairs. 
signed agreement 5 from Shankel 
40  Empire Farms Inc. Camps #15, #17  Bouldin Island  These 40 workers are to be housed in Weyl—Zuckerman Camp #25. See below. 
20  20  A. W. Hutchins Richmond-Chase Hdqtrs. Camp  2 mi. E. of Terminous  O.K. If repairs agreed to are made. 2 occupants in camp at present to be removed. 
10  15  McDonald Island Farms, Ltd. Camp #8  McDonald Island, 6 mi. N. of ferry  O.K. when cleaned and repairs are made. Will take 5 from Shankel. 
signed agreement 
25  25  John C. Kelley Camp #5  Empire Tract, 2 mi. N. of Empire Ferry.  O.K. when major cleaning and repairs are made. Will not need man until Oct. 6 shipment. Should be reinspected Oct. 2nd. Signed agreement to be ready by Oct. 2nd. Must have water analysed. Will take 50 men. 


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Sugar Company: HOLLY

                 
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
25  25  John C. Kelley Camp #12  Lower Jones Tract, 4 mi. N. of Middle River  O.K. when repairs and cleaning agreed to are finished. Will not need men until Oct. 6 shipment. Should be reinspecte Oct. 2nd. Signed agreement to be completed by Oct. 2nd will take 50 men. 
30  30  Clifford Totman Camp #1  Rindge Tract, 1½ mi. E. of ferry  O.K. when minor repairs agreed to are ma de and cleanup. 
Signed Agreement 
15  W. C. Shankel Headquarters  Venice Island, 3 mi. N of ferry  These 15 workers are to be housed as follows. 5 in Rosenberger Camp #15. see above; 5 in McDonald Island Farms Camp #8, see above; and 5 in Thornto Farms, see below. 
15  20  Thornton Farms Kile Ranch  1½ mi. S. E. Thornton on Stockton-Thornton highway  O.K. when minor repairs agreed to are made. This camp will take 5 of the original 15 workers allotted to Shankel. 
20  20  (C. L. McEwen (Camp_#8 _ _ _ (C. L. McEwen (Camp #6  W. side Empire Island 1 mi. N Venice Ferry Road  O. K. when major repairs and cleaning are completed. Operator prefers to use Camp #6 in place this. Needs reinspection 
O.K. when major repairs and seri cleaning are completed 20 men were living here but moving out 9/23 


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NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
The Operator prefers to use this Camp in place of Camp #8 Needs serious reinspection 
Signed agreement 
25  25  Langley Brookes F. E. Booth Hdgtrs. Camp  West Side Ryer Island  O.K. when repairs agreed to are made. Needs reinspection workers expected Oct. 2. 
40  Weyl-Zuckerman Camp #25  Rindge Tract  This camp is to house the 40 workers originally allotted to Empire Farms, Inc. Needs repair which were agreed to Needs rein spection. 
30  20  H. H. Patterson  4 mi. South of Alvarado  O.K. if recommendations are executed. Reinspect Oct. 1 
25  54  Holly Sugar Co.  1/2 mi. N.E. of Pleasanton  O. K. 
20  34  Concord Homes Acres  1/4 mi. N.E. of Concord  O. K. 
A. K. Logan  1½ mi. S. Alvarado  O. K. if recommendations are executed Reinspect Oct. 1 


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Sugar Company: SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY

             
NO. WRKS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
30  30  M. F. West, et. al. Crittenden  2 mi. S. 7 mi. E. from Tracy  O.K. when repairs agreed to are made. Repairs are of a major nature, therefore Camp needs reinspection 
30  30  John Kelley Shima Camp  Shima Tract, 6 mi. N. E. from Stockton  O.K. when repairs agreed to are made. Needs reinspection 
15  15  Rudolph Ripken Art Ripken Ritchie Camp  Terminous Camp 6 mi. S.E. from Terminous  O.K. when repairs agreed to are made 
15  M. Parenti Laucci Camp  Fabian Tract, 5 mi. north from Tracy  Owner did not want workers. No alternate Camp in area. 
415  440 


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District: SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA

Company: American Crystal Sugar Company

                     
WO. WORKS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
40  40  Heringer Bros.  Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by Fredrick Heringer and inspection. 
20  20  Huntley, W. C.  Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by W. C. Huntley and inspection. 
20  20  Merwin & Yelland  Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by Adolph Merwin and inspection. 
25  25  Olson, Gus  Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by Gus Olson and inspection. 
Bunnell Bros.  Merritt Island  Subject to inspection. 
16  Am. Crystal Sugar  Mandeville Island  See D. H. & P. for these workers. 
20  20  Nevis Bros.  Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by Nevis Bros. and inspection. 
28  58  Parella  South Sacramento  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by Parolla and inspection. 
16  16  Scribner, A. N.  Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by Scribner and inspection. 


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NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
10  10  Reamer, H. J. (has agreement with other growers for 10 more me)  Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by H. J. Reamer and inspection. 
24  D. H. & P. (can have 6 more) (Dorsie, Hutchinson and Pettgre)  Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by B. E. Duepelman and inspection. 
25  25  Golden State Asparagus Co.  Andrus Island  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by F. P. Tatum and inspection. 
12  12  Brunk, M. J.  Tyler Island  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by M. J. Brunk and inspection. 
12  12  Bettencourt, E.  Staten Island  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by E. Bettencourt and inspection. 
20  20  Ferreira, Tony  Pierson Dist.  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by Tony Ferreira and inspection. 
15  Giovannoni, L  One-half Mile West of Ryde  Could not get agreement for repairs and clean-up. 
Dambacher, F.  One Mile South Walnut Grove  Could not get agreement for repairs and clean-up. 


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NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
30  Parella & Lawler  Lisbon District  See Parella's Camp at South Sacraments. 
District: SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
Company: SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY 
10  10  R. C. Barr Lucy Wood Camp  One Mile from Laugenour Station  O.K. when agreed to minor repairs are made. 
12  Glenn Lawler  Three Miles East from Knights Landing  Workers can be placed at Bettencourt Ranch located at Natomus after inspection. 6 men can be placed at Barr Ranch after additional repairs are made. 
20  20  H. T. Carlson Ziegler Camp  Two Miles East Nights Landing  O.K. when cleaning and minor repairs are completed. 
20 (Orig. Req.)  20  Lloyd M. Eveland  Five Miles South, Two Miles East from Woodland  O.K. when agreed to repairs are made. 14 units presently used may be vacated soon. 
10 (Ad. Req.) 
20  20  C. F. Wampler & Stanley Good, Jr. Merrit Camp  Four Miles South from Woodland  O.K. when minor repairs are made. 
20  20  Isham, G. B. & G. L.  Four Miles South One Mile West from Woodland  O.K. when agreed to minor repairs are made. Mexican cook desired can accommodate four more. 


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NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
24  24  Avilla, Joa & Manuel  Two Miles North from Woodland  O.K. when agreed to minor repairs are made. 36 more units available if additional repairs are made. 
24  24  Paul Reiff Patton Camp  Three and one-half Miles North from Yolo  O.K. when repairs are made. 2 families of 3 each can be accommodated in which case subtract from total of 24. 
12  12  Floyd Warner  One-half Mile North of Yolo  Camp mentioned in original request rejected. Camp listed here O.K. when minor repairs are made. Can accommodate 6 more. 
10  10  R. Hulbert  One Mile West from Madison  O.K. after minor repairs are made and after agreed to removal of present tomato pickers. 
16  16  J. S. Pogue  One-half Mile East from Elkhorn Ferry Yolo Side  O.K. after minor repairs are agreed to and completed. Should be reinspected. 
20  14  P. N. Ashley  Five Miles Northeast from Woodland (N. of Cache Creek)  O.K. when minor repairs are made. Additional space for 0 available if additional repairs are made and reinspected. 
20  20  L. Lauppe  Four Miles Southwest from Woodland  12 Units available for immediate occupancy after agreed to minor repairs are made. Additional space will be available when present workmen leave. 


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NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
14  20  R. T. Stuhlmuller  Two Miles West of Yola  O.K. after agreed to minor repairs are made. Additional space for 4 available after additional repairs. Space for 3 families (subtract from total) available. Mexican cook desired. 
30  24  Henry Amen  Four Miles Northeast from Woodland  O.K. after repairs are agreed to and completed. Reinspect. 
607  556 


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District: HAMILTON CITY CALIFORNIA

Sugar Company: HOLLY SUGAR CORPORATION

9-24-42

W.P.

                     
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
18  75  Haines, Charles F.  Holly Sugar Corp. Ranch Hamilton City  O.K. as is 
15  Walter, Elmer E.  1½ mi. East of Hamilton City on Chico-Hamilton Highway  O.K. as is 
20  M. & T. Company  3½ mi. SW of Chico on River Rd.  O.K. as is 
Linville, E. E.  1 mi. W. Butle City on Highway  Camp not certified. Place 4 men in Haines, 2 men in Walter and 2 men in M. & T. Co. 
12  12  Livingston, O. W.  Bridge & Fremont Sts. Colusa  O.K. assuming agreed eating facilities made available. 
20  Stutz, J. A.  6 mi. N. of Colusa on Maxwell Rd.  O.K. Eating arrangement should be made. 
30  Polander, Newton  4 mi. S. Princeton on Compton Ranch  O.K. Assuming agreed minor repairs and cleaning is done. 
Torres, F. & E.  2 mi. S. of Princeton on Highway  O.K. Assuming agreed minor repairs and eating arrangements are made. 
75  179 


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District: SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA

Sugar Company: UNION SUGAR COMPANY

     
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
42  200  Union Sugar Company  Bettaravia, Seven Miles West of Santa Maria  Sixty-six Room, 2 Story Hotel - O.K. as is 


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9-24-42

W.A.K.

District: SALINAS (Gilroy-Hollister, San Juan Area) CALIFORNIA

Sugar Company: SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY

                     
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
30  30  Henry Allemand Rush Ranch  One mile East of Gilroy  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection 
24  24  S. Ochoa Lemos Camp  Marcella Avenue, Three miles Northeast Gilroy  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection 
16  Capitanich  San Juan Vicinity  Indefinite-No housing provided. Considering using old hotel in San Juan if available. 
10  Botelho Bros.  San Juan Vicinity  Same condition as for Capitanich. 
10  10  Henry Duran Wehmueller Ranch  Bolsa Road, Two Miles North of Hollister  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection. 
10  10  Henry Duran Luther Ranch #2  Wright Road, Two and one-half miles North east of Hollister  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection. 
Peter Friis Santa Anna Valley  Santa Ana Valley, Eight miles East of Hollister  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection. 
Peter Friis Shore Road  Shore Road, Eight Miles Northwest of Hollister  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection. 
16  16  Harlan and Gambetta Gambetta  San Fillipe Road, One Mile North of Hollister  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection. 


13

                       
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
16  16  Joe Scagliotti Hewlett Place  Pacheco and Auymas Roads Seven Miles North of Hollister  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection 
20  24  Frank Padron (Garcia & Teno) Old Ferry Morse  Fallon Road, Four Miles North of Hollister  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection 
10  Martin Delfin Martin  Five Miles North of Hollister  No housing avilable. (May work out with Padron above) 
10  Alcantara & Garcia  Hollister Vicinity  Indefinite-No housing available. 
14  14  D. H. Lundy Lundy Ranch  Five and one-half Miles Northwest of Hollister  Approved subject to renovations and reinspection 
16  16  J. N. Segobia Mefford  Hudnor Lane, Six Miles Northwest of Hollister  Bunk House to be built. Approved subject to completion of bldg. & fulfillment of requirements as directed. 
District: SALINAS (Monterey County) CALIFORNIA 
Sugar Company: SPRECKELS AND UNION SUGAR COMPANY 
10  10  W. E. Johnson #2  Two Miles South East of Espanosa Road  O.K. as is 
20  20  R. E. Meyers  One Mile South Spence RR Station West of Highway One-half mile  O.K. as is 


14

                         
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
16  16  Manuel Gularte  One Mile North of Soledad West of Highway  O.K. if recommendations are executed. Reinspect October 1. 
16  (16  Barsini  Greenfield, East of Highway on Cherry Avenue  O.K. if recommendations are executed. 
(10  Barsini  Greenfield, One-half Mile North of above  O.K. if recommendations are executed. 
16  16  Spreckels Ranch #1 & 11  Greenfield, East of Highway  O.K. if recommendations are executed. 
12  10  Spreckels Ranch #1 & 11  Greenfield, East of Highway  O.K. as is 
20  20  Spreckels (Midway)  One and one-half Miles North of King City  O.K. as is 
25  25  Spreckels (Office)  One and one-half Miles North of King City  O.K. as is 
30  30  Union Sugar Company  King City  O.K. with recommendations. 
25  25  A. Caletisan  One-fourth Mile North Camphoria  O.K. if recommendations are executed. Reinspect October 1 
70  70  Spreckels Sugar Company  Four mile South of Salinas  O.K. if recommendations are executed. Reinspect October 1 
478  444 


1

TRAIN No. 2

DISTRICT SALINAS

                               
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
King City Area - Union Sugar and Spreckels Sugar Companies 
30  48  Ralph Meyer Union Sugar  Soledad-Turn W. 1 M. S. of Spence Station  Inspected. O.K. 
15  15  Speigl, E.H.  Chular-2 M. S. on Hwgy. 101  Inspected. O.K. when completed. 
15  15  Ralph Meyer  Chular-  Inspected. O.K. 
Gilroy-Hollister, San Juan Area - Spreckels Company 
15  12  Rex Mefferd  Hudner Lane-6 M. NW. Hollister  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed. 
12  14  D.H. Lundy  Belsa Rd.-5½ M. NW Hollister  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed. 
10  12  Henry Duran  Wehmueller Ranch Belsa Rd.-2 M. N. Hollister  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed. Tent Camp 
10  10  6a  Henry Duran  Luther Ranch #2 2½ M. NW. Hollister  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed. 
Peter Friis  Santa Ana Valley 8 M. E. Hollister  Reinspected. OK 
Peter Friis  Frazier Lake Road 8 M. NW. Hollister  Reinspected. O.K. when equipment is placed. 
14  16  Harlan & Gambetta  Pacheco Rd. 6 M. N. Hollister  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed & equipment placed. 
14  16  10  Joe Scagliotti  Pacheco Rd. 6 M. N. Hollister  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed. 
22  24  11  Frank Padron  Old Ferry-Morse Ranch Fallon Rd.  Reinspected. O.K. when equipment is placed. 


2

                                   
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
10  12  12  Delfin Martin  Lanini Ranch 6½ M. N. Hollister  Repairs & Equipment incomplete 9/30. Tent Camp being installed 9/30. No. previous inspection. Owner not available 9/30. Should be O.K. by 10/3. 
King City Area - Union Sugar and Spreckels Sugar Companies 
66  66  13  Spreckels  Ranch #1 at Spreckels  Reinspected. O.K. 
Gilroy-Hollister, San Juan Area - Spreckels Company 
30  30  14  Henry Allemand  Rush Ranch, 1 M. E. Gilroy  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed. Under way 9/30. 
24  24  15  M.R. Lemos  Marcella Ave. 3 M. NE. Gilroy  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed. Under way 9/30. 
12  16  F. O'Connell  O'Connell Ranch Sargent, 5 M. N. San Juan  Reinspected. O.K. when minor agreed to repairs are completed. 
12  17  J. Capitanich  San Juan  No facilities available. 
10  10  18  Bothelo Bros.  San Juan  Hotel used for housing. O.K. 
King City Area - Union Sugar and Spreckels Sugar Companies 
10  16  19  Johnson, W.F.  Castroville  Inspected. O.K. 
12  32  20  Silacci Bros.  Salinas 3 M. N. on MacFadden Rd.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed clean-up is completed. 
13  18  21  Granger Ranch Borja, A.P.  Salinas 4 M. NW. on Blanco Rd.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed clean-up is completed. 
12  14  22  Dolan, James P.  Salinas 2½ M. W. on Davis Rd.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs are completed. 
35  40  23  Union Sugar  King City Camp  Reinspected. O.K. 
31  25  24  Spreckels #3  King City Office Camp  Reinspected. O.K. 


3

                                     
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR ORDERED  LOCATION  REMARKS 
20  20  25  Ranch #3  King City Midway Camp  Reinspected. O.K. 
16  16  26  Spreckels #11  Greenfield 1½ M. S. Turn E. @ SP Milling Co.  Reinspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
(16  27  Spreckels  Greenfield NE. Corner  Reinspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
(10 (Dairy)  27a  Borzini  3rd & Cherry Ave.  Reinspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
10  10  28  Gomes & Reed  Greenfield Next to Spreckels Ranch #11  Reinspected. O.K. 
22  29  Goday, A.  Soledad Dixon Ave. at Palm Street  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
16  27  30  Gularte, M.  Soledad, 1 M. S., 1st Lane W. across Tracks  Reinspected. O.K. when agreed cleanup completed. 
16  50  31  Caletisen, A.  Camphora ¼ M. N. E. side of Hwgy. 101  Reinspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
20  20  (32  Franco M.  King City San Lorenzo St.  Inspected. O.K. 
10  (32a  Forden  King City Canal St.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
Santa Maria Area - Union Sugar Company 
60  50  33  Union Sugar  Betteravia-Hall  Reinspected. O.K. for 60 Housing & feeding - 1st Nite. 
10  16  34  A. Bignardi  Santa Maria Sec. 17, TlON. Rg. 33 E. Santa Maria.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
12  35  A. Corda  Cambria 2½ M. E. on Santa Rosa Creek Rd.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
12  48  36  Garcia Pereira  San Luis Obispo 2 M. S. on Hwgy. 101  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
12  12  37  Union Sugar Camp Field R-3  Betteravia Adjacent  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
163  836 


4

                             
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
Union Sugar Camp N-3A  Betteravia 3 M. NW.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed cleanup completed. 
18  Union Sugar Camp L-3  Lompoc 5 M. W.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
12  Houk, R.P.  Lompoc 10 M. SE. on Santa Rosa Rd.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
15  Union Sugar Camp G.7A  Betteravia  Inspected. O.K. when agreed cleanup completed. 
Union Sugar Camp F-5  Guadalupe 5 M. N.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
20  Union Sugar Camp F-3C  Guadalupe 5 M. N.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
Union Sugar  Guadalupe 4½ M. N. Camp F-6  Inspected. O.K. when agreed cleanup completed 
15  Silva, M.  Arroyo Grande S. 3 M. on Sienaga Rd.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
15  Oliver, M.  Arroyo Grande 4 M. S. on Sienaga Rd.  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
14  Nagano, Wm. Dalidio  San Luis Obispe 2 M. S. on Hwgy. 101  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 
Bianchi Bros.  Cambria 3 M. E. on Santa Rosa Creek Rd.  Rejected (House unsafe) 
Gilroy-Hollister, San Juan Area - Spreckels Company 
15  Petersen Bros.  2 M. NW. of San Juan  Not previously inspected. Owner agrees to repair & renovate by 10/3. Should be reinspected before final approval. Probably O.K. by 10/4. 


5

     
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
15  Betts, O.E.  2 M. NE. San Juan on Luce Brown Lane  Inspected. O.K. when agreed repairs completed. 


1

TRAIN No. 3

DISTRICT STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA

COMPANY HOLLY SUGAR COMPANY

(10-3-42)

                       
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
20  20  Hutchins, A. W, Rich. Chase Hdq. Camp  2 M. E. of Terminous  OK. (Signed agreement from previous inspection 9/24/42). 
50  50  Kelly, J. C, Camp #12  Lower Jones Tract 4 M. N. Middle Rv.  OK. When repairs are completed. Did not have work completed as per agreement. Operator says he can finish before workers arrive. (Signed agreement from previous inspection trip. 9-24-42) 
30  30  Totman, Clifford Camp #1  Rindge Tract 1½ M. E. of Forry  OK with minor repairs & cleanup. (Signed agreement from previous inspection trip. 9-24-42) 
25  25  Brooks, Langley, F. E. Booth Hdq. Camp  West Side Ryer Island  O.K. 
Briseo, H. A. Thornton Farms Camp  1 M. E. of Thornton  O.K. when major repairs & cleaning are completed. Signed agreement. 
19  66  Brown, J. S. Jr. Libby-McNeil  C.P.C. Hdgtrs. Hastings Ranch, 19 mi. S. E. of Dixon.  O. K. as is. 
20  20  Sturgas, E. C.  Canal Ranch N. of Stockton  O.K. when major repairs agreed to are made. Signed agreement 
10  23  Frost, Clyde R.  Sterling Rd. Mt. View ¼ M. N. of Bayshore  O.K. when repairs are made. Operator not contacted. Holly Sugar Co. notified. 
10  30  Goscilia, Leo  West Side Monterey Highway 9 M. S. of San Jose  O.K. when repairs are made. Operator not contacted. Holly Sugar Co. notified. 
20  20  10  Aguiar, F. S.  2 M. NE. San Pablo  O.K. when repairs agreed to are made. Signed agreement. 


2

COMPANY SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY

                               
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
12  15  11  Boulton, J. W.  Roberts Island at McDonald Ferry ½ M. E.  OK. when agreed repairs are made. Signed agreement 
20  21  12  Parenti, M.  Roberts Island Hdq. Camp  This camp was substituted for originally assigned Laucci Camp, on Fabian Tract. Camp OK when repairs are made. Acceptance of required repairs confirmed by phone to regional office 10-5-42. 
AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR COMPANY - SACRAMENTO DISTRICT 
20  25  13  Huntley, W. C.  Clarksburg  O.K. 
30  54  14  Fernandex & D.H.&P.  Clarksburg  O.K. 
20  20  15  Nevis Bros., Mitchell & Coulter  Clarksburg  O.K. 
10  20  16  Reamer & Marshall  Clarksburg  O.K. 
68  68  17  Parolla, C.  West Sacramento  O.K. 
10  25  18  Colby, Anna  1 M. W. Clarksburg N. End Merritt Isle.  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by A. Colby & inspection. 
16  36  19  Bunnel Bros. & R. J. Harringer  4 M. S., 1 M. W. Clarksburg  Subject to improvements as per agreement signed by M. E. Bunnel 
16  34  20  Slater Bros.  3 M. S. Courtland Rd. Clarksburg  O.K. 
HOLLY SUGAR COMPANY - HAMILTON CITY DISTRICT 
18  75  21  Haines, C. F. Hamilton City Labor Camp  Holly Ranch  O.K. 
15  22  Walter, Elmer E.  1½ M. E. of Hamilton C. on Chico Hwy.  O.K. 


3

HOLLY SUGAR COMPANY

                                   
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
20  23  M & T, Inc.  3½ M. SW. of Chico on River Rd.  O.K. 
10  12  24  Livingston, O. W.  Bridge & Fremont Sts., Colusa  O.K. 
30  25  Polander, Newton  4 M. S. of Princeton on Compton Ranch  O.K. 
25  26  Erdman, F. & Wm. Chas. Richards Camp  Across river from Princeton  O.K. assuming agreed repairs are made. 
10  27  Stutz, George  3 M. N. of Chico on Main Hwy.  O. K. assuming agreed repairs are made. 
10  10  28  Tennant Co.  5½ M. N. of Colusa  O. K. assuming agreed repairs are made. 
29  Wright, W. H.  5½ M. N. of Colusa  Men to be housed at M & T, Inc. 
12  30  Baxter & Woell  4 M. S. of Chico  O. K. when agreed to repairs are made. 
SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY 
12  12  31  Brunk, M. J.  Tyler Isle. 4 M. S. of Walnut Grove  O.K. 
10  10  32  Giometti Bros. Libby-McNeil Camp  Tyler Isle. 3 M. E. of Isleton  O.K. 
10  10  33  Barr, R. C.  1 M. E. from Laugenour Camp  O.K. previously inspected. 
30  30  34  Eveland Bros.  5 M. S., 2 M. E. Woodland  O.K. previously inspected. 
10  10  35  Hulbert, R.  1 M. W. of Madison  O.K. previously inspected. 
24  24  36  Avilla, M.  2 M. N. of Woodland  O.K. previously inspected. 
15  15  37  Stuhlmuller, R.  3 M. N. of Yolo  O.K. previously inspected. but needs cook. 


4

DISTRICT SACRAMENTO DISTRICT, CALIFORNIA

COMPANY SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY

                     
No. WKRS. ORDERED  APPROVED FOR  IDENT.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
10  10  38  Fong Yen, Ashley Camp  2 M. N., 4 M. E. of Spreckels Sugar Co., Factory at Woodland  New. Requires numberous minor repairs to privies & showerhouses but bunkhouse & messhalls are in very good condition. 12 workers in bunkhouse in 1 tent & 10 in another which needs canvas. 
39  Comontofski, E.F. Isham Camp  1 M.S., 1 M. W. of Woodland  O.K. previously inspected but needs cook. 
30  30  40  Parella & Lawler  West Sacramento  O.K. 
16  16  41  Pogue, J. S. O'Connor Camp  ½ M. above Elkhorn Ferry 2nd House  Reinspected, all repairs made except for 1 which is to be done as soon as possible. 
25  25  42  Kunze Bros. Pierce Camp  3½ M. W. of Davis Hwy. 40, Putah Bridge  O.K. previous inspection. 
18  18  43  Greer, A. J. Hunt Camp  2 M. E., 1 M. S. Davis  O.K. previous inspection. 
12  12  44  Carl Becker Williamson Camp  1 M. E. Davis  New Inspection. An old camp needs numerous minor repairs & oxtensive cleaning to reuse. 
20  20  45  Patterson, W. H. Williams Camp  3½ M. S, 2 M. W. Woodland  New Inspection. Bunkhouse in excellent condition. Workers to eat at nearby camp. Owners will provide transportation for meals and bathing. 
10  10  46  Darsie & Beck  Staton Island  Subject to improvement as per signed agreement "Beck" & inspection. 


5

DISTRICT SACRAMENTO COUNTY, C/L IFORN IA

COMPANY SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY

       
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
10  10  47  Bento, A. M. Parella Camp  W. Sacramento Alasak Packers Camp  O.K. 
60  Lowe, W. K. Gomez Camp  2 M. N., 5 M. E. of Spreckels Sugar Co. Factory, Woodland.  New inspection. Owner not listed but desires workers. Camp in good condition but needs minor repairs. 


1

TRAIN No. 4

(10-9-42): H.Z.

DISTRICT STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA

COMPANY HOLLY SUGAR COMPANY

                               
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
20  54  Fernandez, H.P.- (Holly Sugar Camp)  "Z" Line at Clarksburg  Previously inspected. 
22  22  Flint Bros (Camp #17)  Staten Island 
31  31  Robinson, I.N. (Robinson Farm Ranch #1)  About 14 M. SW of Stockton 
Sacramento District - Holly Sugar Company 
18  75  Haines, Chas. F. (AHamilton City Labor Camp)  Holly Ranch 
20  M. & T., Inc.  3½ M. SE. Chico on River Rd.  Previously inspected. 
25  Erdman, F & Wm. (Chas. Richards Camp)  6 M. N. of Colusa  Previously iX(nspected. 
12  Livingston, G. W.  1 M. S. of Colusa  Previously inspected. 
30  Pollander, Newton  4 M. S. of Princeton on Compton Ranch  Previously inspected. 
20  Stuts, Joe, Jr.  6 M. N. of Colusa on Maxwell Rd.  Previously inspected. 
35  10  Flint, John W.  6 M. N. of Colusa on Maxwell Rd.  Previously inspected. 
11  Landrus, Paul  2 M. E. of Williams  Previously inspected. 
Sacramento District - Spreckels Sugar Company 
25  30  12  Noteware, H.D. (Texas Camp)  Brannon Island  Previously inspected. Initial Survey 


2

                                       
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
26  13  Amen, H. (Hackett Camp)  1 M. E. from Factory #3  Rejected order. Due to reports of extravagant demands of imported wkrs. 
20  20  (14  Carlson, N.T. (Zieglar Camp)  2 M. E. Knights Landing  )Ivan Shuey transports his 10 men from this camp. 
10  10  (15  Shuey, Ivan (Zieglar Camp)  2 M. E. Knights Landing  )Housing & Boarding facilities in same camp. O.K. 
16  16  (16  Meek, W.H. (Lowe Camp)  Woodland, 2 M. N., 4 M. E. from Factory #3  )Housing & Boarding facilities in same camp. O.K. 
16  16  (17  Lowe, W.K. (Lowe Camp) 
13  13  (18  Lawler, John  Sacramento 1 M. E. of Elkhorn Ferry  )Housing & Boarding facilities in same camp. O.K. 
12  (19  Lauppe, L. 
16  20  Pollack, R. (Barr Camp)  Woodland, 2 M. N., 3 M. E. of Factory #3  This camp is full to its capacity. Rejected. 
King City District - Union Sugar Company 
16  16  21  Union Sugar Co. Camp  King City  O.K. 
King City District - Spreckels Sugar Company 
10  10  22  S.S. Co. Ranch 3  King City (Midway Camp)  O.K. 
12  12  23  S.S. Co. Ranch 3  King City (Ortego Camp)  O.K. 
10  10  24  Franco, Mike  King City  O.K. 
25  Borzini, M.  Greenfield  O.K. 
26  Godoy, M.  Soledad  O.K. 
Salinas District - Union Sugar Company 
16  16  27  Meyers, Ralph  Chular  O.K. 


3

DISTRICT SALINAS, CALIFORNIA

COMPANY SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY

                                       
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
10  10  28  S.S. Co. Ranch 1  Spreckels  O.K. Agreement signed. 
10  10  29  Speigl, E.  Chular  O.K. 
10  10  30  Meyers, Ralph Co.  Chular  O.K. 
31  Lemos, M.E.  Gilroy 
30  30  32  I.D.E.S. Hall  Gilroy  Will require mess hall or tent for 30 men. 
12  33  Lindeleaf Bros.  Gilroy  O.K. when signed agreement is completed. 
30  28  34  Saveria, F.J.  Watsonville Chittenden Rd.  O.K. as is. 
10  10  35  Betts, Hazel M.  San Juan  O.K. 
10  14  36  Peterson Bros. Rch. (Jacques operator)  San Juan  O.K. when signed agreement is completed. 
Guadalupe District - Union Sugar Company 
37  Roberts, Frank  Guadalupe (U.S.Co.) Camp Field N-3-A  O.K. 
12  12  38  Cuggia, Joe  Guadalupe (U.S.Co.) Camp Field R-3  O.K. 
39  Fillipponi & Barca Bros. (Betteravia Hall)  Guadalupo  O.K. 
40  Adam Bros. (Betteravia Hall)  O.K. 
Guadaulupe District - American Crystal Company 
70  60  41  Calif. Lettuce Growrs.  Guadalupe  O.K - 2 separato bldgs. 26 men in 618 
34 men in 510 
588  750 


4

ADDITIONAL SITES INSPECTED

                                     
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
Sacramento District - Spreekels Sugar Company 
Roiff, Paul (City Camp)  Woodland 212 Main St.  Reinspection necessary. There is doubt whether required measures can be fulfilled. 
16  Pollock, R. (Hoffman Ranch)  Wooland 1 M. N. & 1 M. E. from Factory 3  O.K. 
16  Wray & Winters (Hecke Ranch)  Woodland 1 M. W. & 2½ M. S. of Woodland  O.K. for 16. They will put up tents for an addnl. 4 men. 
15  Johnston Bros. (Dairy Camp)  Verona 4 M. N. of Verona on Garden Hwy.  O.K. 
Santa Maria District - American Crystal Sugar Company 
Harry Harris  Harris Sta. S. of Santa Maria  O.K. 
10  Hansen & Sharer  Harris Sta. S. of Santa Maria  Cleaning & repairs to be made. 
10  Dune Lakes, Ltd.  near coast from Arroyo Grande  Cleaning & repairs to be made. 
Salinas District - Spreekels Sugar Company 
20  Church Rch.  Salinas  O.K. 
40  Growers Shippers Assoc.  Watsonville  To install mess hall partitions 
10  Nunes, K.L.  Harris Lane near Spreckels  O.K. if signed agreement is completed 
Alvarado District - Holly Sugar Company 
10  Mrs. Kennedy  Santa Clara  Minor repairs to be made. 
14  Mancini Rch.  Alvarado 2 M. S. on Hwy.  O.K. 
10  Leo Gascilla  San Jose 5 M. S.  O.K. 


1

TRAIN No. 5

DISTRICT STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA

COMPANY HOLLY SUGAR COMPANY

(10-17-42)

                           
NO WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
14  15  Shankel, W.C. (Hdqtrs. Camp)  Venice Island (4 M. SW. Venice Ferry)  Previously inspected Train #1 
10  31  Robinson, I.N., Jr. (Robinson Farms Ranch #1)  14 M. SW. of Stockton  Previously inspected Train #4 
40  60  Westgate, E.W. (Terminus Farms Camp)  3/4 M. NE. of Terminus  O.K. assuming agreed minor repairs & cleaning is done. 
16  20  Garin, H.P. Co. (Maybeck Rch.)  5 M. W. of Stockton  O.K. assuming agreed minor repairs & cleaning is done. 
14  Smith, Geo. H. (Hdqtrs. Camp)  Jersey Island (38 M. W. of Stockton in Contra Costa Co.  Order for men cancelled. 
20  Hutchins, A.W. (Richmond Chase Hdqtrs. Camp)  2 M. E. of Terminus  Previously inspected Train #1 
14  14  Lund, Victor (Holly Sugar Commun. Labor Camp)  1 M. N. Pleasanton  Originally inspected & certified for 54 Mexican workers 
12  16  Rasmussen, Harry (Rasmussen Ranch)  1 M. S. of RyerGrand Isle. Ferry 
16  24  McCormick, Thomas  Sherman Island (2½ M. E. of Antioch Bridge)  O.K. assuming agreed minor repairs & cleaning is done. Antioch Bridge) 
15  26  10  Rosellini, G.  W. Side Grand Isle.  O.K. assuming agreed minor repairs & cleaning is done. 
16  16  11  Bumn, Lum (2 camps available H.P. McGillivray Rch. Watanabe Hotel)  2 M. E. of Thornton or Walnut Grove  O.K. assuming agreed minor repairs & cleaning is done. 
10  12  12  Barber, G.L.  2½ M. N. of Thornton  O.K. assuming agreed minor repairs & cleaning is done. 


2

DISTRICT STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA

COMPANY SPRECKELS SUGAR COMPANY

                                     
NO. WKRS ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION OF CAMP  REMARKS 
15  15  13  Ripkin, R. (Torminus Camp)  6 M. SE. of Torminus  Previously inspected Train #1. 
15  14  Boulton, J.W.  Roberts Isle & McDonald Ferry, ½ M.E.  Previously inspected Train #3 
10  30  15  West, N. (Crittenden Camp)  5 M. E. Tracy  Previously inspected Train #1 
Sacramento District - American Crystal Sugar Company 
32  32  16  Pilz, Hanrahan & Perry (Hanrahan Camp)  Clarksburg  O.K. with repairs. 
16  54  17  Fernandox, D.H.&P.  Clarksburg  O.K. previously inspected 
(Darcie, Hutchins & Pottigrow Camp)  Train #3. 
18  Pylman, Harvey  Morritt Island  Now camp in Clarksburg O.K. if cleaned. 
10  10  19  Souza, Joo & L., & Valino (Colby Camp)  Clarksburg  O.K reinspection was O.K. except toilet, still needs now one. 
15  16  20  Soribner A.N.  Clarksburg  O.K. reinspection was O.K. 10/15/42 M.J. Orig. Ins. Train 1 
Sacramento District - Spreckels Sugar Company 
12  12  21  Bettencourt, E. (Toepelman Camp)  ¼ M. S. Isleton Bridge  O.K. with min. cleaning & repair. 
16  16  22  Giovannoni, R. (Std. Oil Camp)  Andrus Isle. 5 M. S. of Isleton  O.K. 
20  20  23  Campi, PM. & J. (Std. Oil Camp)  2 M. S. of Isleton  O.K. previously inspected Train #0. 
16  16  24  Lewallen, J. (Spreckels Camp)  6 M. S. of Isleton  New layout (hotetin Isleton - feed at old camp) O.K. 
10  10  25  Golden State Asparagus Co.  4 M. S. of Isleton  O.K. previously inspected Train#0. 
12  28  26  Heidrick Bros.  Woodland ½ M. S. of Brown's Corner  O.K. for 12 Addtl. (Cap. 28 in camp = 16, New 12) 


3

                                   
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
24  24  27  Wray & Winters (Hecke Camp)  3 M. S. 1 M. W. Woodland  O.K. 
10  50  28  Eveland Bros.  5 M. S. 2 M. E. Woodland  O.K. (1st reinspection) 38 men now in camp. 
15  35  29  Best, Dan (Patton Camp)  Woodland 3 M. N. of Yolo  O.K. (1st reinspection). 
10  39  30  Amen, Henry (Hackett Camp)  Woodland (1 M. E. of Spreckels Factor)  O.K. (1st reinspection) 19 men now in camp. 
12  18  31  Williams, M. (Shell Oil Camp)  Davis ½ M. E. Davis Subway  O.K. 
12  12  32  Becker, Carl Williamson, C.  1 M. SW. of Davis  O.K. previously inspected Train #3. 
15  15  33  Johnston Bros.  4 M. N. of Verona  O.K. previously inspected Train #4. 
28  57  (34  Tuttle, Chas. (Balsdon Camp)  4 M. W. of Grimes  (See explanations on certification sheet. OK. for 28 new workers only) 
(35  Kaelin, L. (Balsdon Camp)  4 M. W. of Grimes 
26  36  Greer, F.J. & Sons (Harby Roh.)  2½ M. SE. of Davis  O.K. 
Holly Sugar Company  ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATIONS 
26  Holly Sugar Plant  Alvarado  O.K. If signed agreement is completed. 
Spreckels Sugar Company 
Dunham, R.L. (Vadalas Camp)  In the town of Yola  O.K. (An alternate). 
20  Cauzza, Henry  7 M. SE. of Grimes  This is an alternative for housing 20 men. 
15  Andriotti, H.  3½ M. SE. of Grimes on River Roa d  This is an alternative for eating only. (15 men). 


4

Holly Sugar Company

                     
NO. WKRS. ORDERED  CAMP APPROVED FOR  IDENT. NO.  OWNER OR OPERATOR  LOCATION  REMARKS 
18  Gebicke, R. A.  1 M. NE Butte City  (1st reinspection). 10 men in camp 
Stutz, Geo.  3 M. N. of Chico on Main Hwy.  (1st reinspection). 8 men in camp 
10  Baxtor & Woell  4 M. S. of Chico on Main Hwy.  (1st reinspection). 6 men in camp 
16  Ullrich & Pollander  4 M. S. of Princeton  (1st reinspection). 16 men in camp 
16  Livingston (City Camp)  Main St. Colusa  (1st reinspection). 16 men in camp 
20  Erdman, F. & Wm.  8 M. S Butte City  (1st reinspection). 12 men in camp 
Spreckels Sugar Company 
45  Meek & Lowe (Lowe Camp)  7 M. NE. Woodland  (1st reinspection). 45 men in camp 
15  Reiff, Paul (City Camp)  212 Main St. Woodland  (1st reinspection). 15 men in camp 


1

Exhibit D: Check Sheet for Inspection of Housing and Sanitary Facilities

figure


1

Exhibit E: [Housing Inspection Form]

The following housing site operated by Westgate, E. W.

Located at ½ M. E. & ½ M. N. of Terminus

Will be submitted to Farm Security Administration for certification for Farm Labor workers providing the following measures are fulfilled:

  1. General Cleaning of Kitchen and Mess Hall
  2. Install doors and repair broken screen in privies
  3. Provide drainage away from underneath shower house.
  4. General cleaning of bunk house and replace missing or damaged screens.
  5. Provide ticks for beds.

This work shall be done by Saturday evening Oct. 16

Total permitted occupants: 60

Agreed to by:

E. W. Westgate by W. Shelby
Owner, Operator or Processor
William Pirrone
Farm Security Administration Inspector
Date: October 14, 1942


1

Exhibit F: [Housing Inspection Form]

The following housing site operated by D. H. Lundy

Located at

Will be submitted to Farm Security Administration for certification for Farm Labor workers providing the following measures are fulfilled:

Extend partition to roof to separate kitchen from bunkhouse

Stop openings under eaves (above plate) or screen.

Screen all openings - batten cracks

Provide one flyproof privy

Flyproof present privy

provide beds and pads

Provide kitchen equipment.

Installation of shower head in bathhouse is recommended.

Facilities will accommodate 14 men when above requirements are met.

To be ready for occupance 9/28/42

Agreed to by:

D. H. Lundy
Owner, Operator or Processor
W. A. Keene
Farm Security Administration Inspector
Date: 9-22-42

Exhibit G: Minimum Type Pit Privy For Farm Labor Camps

figure

Exhibit G: Minimum Type Pit Privy For Farm Labor Camps

figure

Exhibit G (cont.): Minimum Type Shower Bath House

figure

Exhibit G (cont.): Drainage For Minimum Type Shower Bath House


1

Exhibit H: [Housing Standards]

HOUSING STANDARDS FOR FSA TRANSPORTED WORKERS IN CALIFORNIA

  • 1. Housing Structure - Cabins, bunkhouses, former residences or tents in good condition shall be located on ground not subject to flood, shall be reasonably proofed against weather and in safe structural condition. Floors, walls and ceilings shall be clean. Floors shall be wood or concrete. Floor space shall be approximately 60 square feet per person. If used for family housing, each family shall have a segregated area at least 12' by 14' in area. If housing is used for food preparation or mess hall purposes, doors and windows shall be screened flytight. Provisions shall exist for scouring and soalding cooking and eating utensils.
  • 2. Furniture and Fixtures - Beds, cots or wooden bunks shall be provided together with mattresses or straw ticks. Minimum clearance between beds or bunks shall be 20". Chairs, stools or benches shall be provided. Provisions shall exist for feeding the workers or facilities shall be furnished for the workers to prepare their own food, if they so desire. If the workers elect to prepare their own food, places for purchase of food and other necessities at standard market prices shall be readily accessible, or made accessible with the assistance of the employer.
  • 3. Bathing and Laundry Facilities - Some facilities shall exist for bathing, either shower bath or tub. If showers are provided, there shall be one head for not more than each 15 men. If tubs are furnished, there shall be one tub for every 15 men. Hot water is not required. Provisions shall be made for washing clothes. One laundry tray or tub shall be provided for each 15 workers. Provisions shall be made for heating hot water for clothes washing. If tubs are provided for bathing, they need not be duplicated for washing clothes.
  • 4. Sanitation - Toilets shall be flush type or pit privy. There shall be at least one toilet seat for each 15 persons. If pit privies are used, they shall be located out of swales and out of the path of rain water run-off. Privies shall not be located over irrigation canals or streams. Privies shall be located at least 100' from well used for domestic water supply. Privies shall be flytight and seats covered. Privies shall be at least 75' from sleeping quarters. Drainage from showers, sinks or flush toilets shall be run through a covered drain to a covered cesspool or septic tank. Flytight and covered receptacles shall be provided for garbage or refuse. Such garbage shall be disposed of by burying, burning or hauling away. Grounds around the camp shall be kept clean.
  • 5. Water Supply - Pure water for drinking and bathing shall be readily available. One hose bibb or spigot shall be provided for every 30 men. Supply shall be capable of providing at least 15 gallons per person per day.
  • 6. Conveniences - First aid kit shall be available at every camp. In case of necessity, transportation shall be provided to doctor or hospital.

This outline of housing standards includes all requirements of the State Labor Code and the California State Division of Immigration and Housing.


1

Exhibit I: Mexican Labor Group Receiving Medical and Dental Care

AGRICULTURAL WORKERS HEALTH AND MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

TABLE 1: Cumulative Through November 20, 1942

MEDICAL CARE       
Members Accepted for Medical Care  406 
Care Completed During Period  10 
Members Under Care at End of Period  396 

DENTAL CARE       
Members Extended Dental Care  24 
Care Completed During Period 
Members Under Care at End of Period  21 

CASES OF ILLNESS       
Cases of Illness Accepted for Treatment  458 
Cases Completed During Period  14 
Cases Under Treatment at End of Period  444 


1

Exhibit J: Medical Statistical Report — Mexican Labor Program

Table 2 — Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association

figure

Table 2 — Agricultural Workers Health and Medical Association


2

figure

Medical Statistical Report — Mexican Labor Program [page 2]


1

Exhibit K: [Earnings Summary]

WORK & EARNINGS SUMMARY MEXICAN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS BY AREAS & PERIODS                                  
Workers on Hourly Rates 
Week ending November 7  Week ending November 14 
AREA  Av.No.Days Worked  Av.No.Hrs. Worked  Av.Hourly Earnings  Av.Weekly Earnings  Av.No.Days Worked  Av.No.Hrs. Worked  Av.Hourly Earnings  Av.Weekly Earnings 
Chico  5.1  47.4  $0.70  $33.02  5.1  47  $0.70  $32.87 
Sacramento  No  figures  available  6.0  50  0.70 Estimate by local office. No exact figures available yet.  35.00 Estimate by local office. No exact figures available yet. 
Stockton  No  figures  available  No  figures  available 
Salinas  No  figures  available  5.1  42  00.55  23.07 
Santa Maria  None 
Piece rates 
Week ending November 7  Week ending November 14 
AREA  Av.No.Days Worked  Av.No.Hrs. Worked  Av.Hourly Earnings  Av.Weekly Earnings  Av.No.Days Worked  Av.No.Hrs. Worked  Av.Hourly Earnings  Av.Weekly Earnings 
Chico  45  No figures available yet.  No figures available yet.  3.5  34  No figures available yet.  No figures available yet. 
Sacramento  No  figures  available  6.0  50  $0.65  $32.50 Estimate by local office. No exact figures available yet. 
Stockton  No  figures  available  No  figures  available 
Salinas  5.3  46.4  $0.34  $14.10  4.6  40  0.45  17.98 
Santa Maria  4.2  38.4  0.67  25.50  5.1  46.6  0.52  26.65 


1

Exhibit L: WEEKLY WORK & EARNINGS SUMMARY

figure


1

Exhibit M: FARM VISIT REPORT

figure


1

Exhibit N: FARM VISIT REPORT

figure


1

Exhibit O: [Form IX-546] EMPLOYMENT TERMINATION AGREEMENT

(11-16-42)

(FSA-504)

WORKER NO._____

EMPLOYMENT TERMINATION AGREEMENT

THIS AGREEMENT, made this 11 day of November, 1942 397 entered into between the Government of the United States of America, hereinafter called the "Patron" and
ANTONIO P. GARCIA 397
hereinafter called the "Worker,"

WITNESSETH:

WHEREAS, the Patron and the Worker on the
24 day of September, 1942
entered into an "Individual Work Agreement" hereinafter called the "Work Agreement," under which, upon completion of the period of employment specified therein, the Worker is to be returned by the Patron to the point of origin stated in the Work Agreement; and

WHEREAS, the Worker wishes to terminate said period of employment and return to the point of origin because,
Doesn't feel he can do work in sugar beets.

NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual undertakings hereinafter stated, the Patron and the Worker mutually agree as follows:

1. The period of employment specified in the Work Agreement is hereby terminated as of the
11 day of November, 1942

2. The transportation of the Worker to the point of origin specified in the Work Agreement shall begin on the
11 day of November, 1942

3. Except as expressly modified in this agreement, the terms of the Work Agreement shall continue in full force and effect:

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Patron and the Worker have caused this instrument to be executed as of the date first above written.

El Trabajador - Worker

Antonio P. Garcia

Los Estados Unidos de America-United States of America

Por-By C. E. Mead

Ass't Employment Supervisor

Testigos — Witnesses

Adlai Goldschmidt

FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

F255169

_____

ACUERDO PARA TERMINAR EMPLEO

ESTE CONTRATO hecho el dia 11 day of November, 1942 397 se celebra entre los Estados de America, y que en el cuerpo de mismo se denominará "El Patrón," y ANTONIO P. GARCIA 397 a quién en el cuerpo del mismo se denominará "El Trabajador"

DAN FE QUE:

EN VISTA DE QUE, el Patrón y el Trabajador en el día
24 day of September, 1942
celebrarón un "Contrato Individual de Trabajo" que en el cuerpo del mismo se denominará "Contrato de Trabajo," bajo cual, al cumplir el plazo de empleo aqui especificado, el Trabajador debe ser mandado por el Patron al lugar de procedencia manifestado en el Contrato de Empleo; y

EN VISTA DE QUE, el Trabajador desea terminar su plazo de empleo y regresar al lugar de procedencia porque, _____

Y POR LO TANTO, en vista de las garantías mutuales mas abajo indicadas, el Patron y el Trabajador quedan en el acuerdo que sigue:

1a. El plazo de empleo especificado en el Contrato de Trabajo se termina con fecha de 11 day of November, 1942

2a. El viaje del Trabajador al lugar de procedencia especificado en el Contrato de Trabajo comenzara 11 day of November, 1942

3a. Con excepcion de los cambios hechos expresamente en este contrato, las condiciones del Contrato de Trabajo continuarán en su plena fuerza y efecto:

EN FE DE LO CUAL, el Patrón y el Trabajador convienen en que este documento tenga la fuerza legal correspondiente desde la primera fecha antes mencionada,

El Trabajador - Worker:

Antonio P. Garcia

Los Estados Unidos de America-United States of America

Por-By C. E. Mead

Ass't Employment Supervisor

Testigos — Witnesses

Adlai Goldschmidt

FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

F255169


1

Exhibit P: [Form IX-542] COMPLAINT REPORT

(11-5-42)

United States Department of Agriculture

Farm Security Administration

Farm Labor Transportation Program

Date of Hearing Nov. 9, 1942

Field Office Stockton

FORMAL COMPLAINT REPORT

Grower Wiensheimer Camp at ½ mi. NE of Thornton

Complaint Made by Jorge R. Reige and H. A. Briscoe Worker _____ Emp. Rep. _X_

         
WORKERS INVOLVED 
IN COMPLAINT:  413  426  327  395  202  337 
(List by Number  395  144  96  395  327  2860 
Only) 

NATURE OF COMPLAINT:

Grower asked Holly sugar Co. to transfer these 11 workers because they were not producing. Simultanciously group leader filed written complaint against growers to whom group had been assigned.

FINDINGS:

These workers were transferred from Wiensheimer to John Kelley. Upon arrival at the Kelley Ranch, they found that the basis of pay was the piece rate scale and they refused to go to work. Whereupon Kelley delivered then to Stockton and left them on the street.

The workers refused to continue in sugar beets and requested repatriation. They were offered employment in guayule, and ten of the group accepted it. No. 397 stated that climate did not agree with his health and that he would not accept employment in any crop.

ACTION TAKEN:

Repatriation 1 worker

Transfer to Guayule 10 workers

  • 1. Number of workers returned to pint of origin. (Termination Agreements attached)
  •     . . . . . . . 1
  • 2. Number transferred to another grower. _____ To _____ Field Office. _____
  •     
  • 3. Number transferred from Sugar Beets crop to Guayule crop
  •     . . . . . 10

ROUTING: Original to R.O. Copy to Grower File, Copy on back of Term. Agree. copies.

SIGNED: Mr. Hicks

(Check one) FSA LR Specialist X Area Emp. Supv. _____


1

Exhibit Q: [Repatriation Report]

REPORT OF REPATRIATION OF MEXICAN NATIONALS AS OF NOVEMBER 21, 1942                                    
Number 
Reason for Return  of men 
Physical inability to perform work in sugar beets  77 
Unwilling to perform work in sugar beets  26 
Illness  11 
Illness in family at home  26 
Family difficulties at home 
Home sick 
Deaths in families in Mexico 
Friends or relatives returning 
Business difficulties in Mexico 
Recalled by Mexican Government for educational reasons 
Fighting 
Drunkenness 
Larceny 
Men left work and returned across border without notifying
Farm Security Administration 
Total returned  165 


1

Exhibit R: [Workers Missing Report]

CUMULATIVE NO. MEXICAN WORKERS MISSING BY AREAS AND PERIODS                
Nov. 7  Nov. 14  Nov. 21 
Chico 
Sacramento 
Stookton  24  33 
Salinas  62  68  68 
Santa Maria  Report not yet received. 
Total  72  100  103 


1

Exhibit S: Weekly Field Report

figure


2

figure

Exhibit S (cont.): Weekly Field Report / Instruction [reverse]


1

Exhibit T: Renewal of Work Agreement

No._____

AGREEMENT OF RENEWAL OF INDIVIDUAL WORK AGREEMENT

Pursuant to the terms of Paragraph 13 of that certain agreement dated
_____________, 19___
entitled "Individual Work Agreement" and entered into by and between the Government of the United States, therein called and hereinafter referred to as "Patron", and
___________
a Mexican laborer, therein referred to and hereinafter called "The Worker".

WITNESSETH:

Patron and Worker mutually agree that said Individual Work Agreement shall be and hereby is renewed and extended until
_____________, 19___

It is mutually agreed and understood that said Individual Work Agreement has been renewed and extended, as herein provided, with the knowledge and consent of the Mexican Government.

The terms and conditions of said Individual Work Agreement as originally executed shall continue in effect during the period of such renewal and extension, unmodified and unaltered except as the parties thereto shall expressly agree in writing.

This extension is in accordance with an official communication from Secretaría Del Trabajo y Previsión Social Number 6233, dated November 24, 1942, signed by Lic. Luis Fernandez Del Campo, Director Prevision Social.

Dated this day of / Hecho a _____ de ___________, 19___

El Trabajador - Worker.

____________________

Los Estados Unidos de America - United States of America

Por- By ____________________

____________________

Titulo Oficial - Official Title.

FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

NOVACION DE CONTRATO INDIVIDUAL DE TRABAJO

Conforme los Términos del Cláusula 13 del Contrato del día
_____, 19_____
titulado "Contrato Individual de Trabajo", celebrado entre el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos, al que se denominará en esta Contrato "Patrón" y.
_____
trabajador Mexicano, a quien se le denominará "El Trabajador".

SE HACE CONSTAR:

El Patrón y el Trabajador convienen que dicho Contrato Individual de Trabajo, ha quedado renovado y por lo mismo, se amplía su término hasta el día
_____, 19_____

Queda entendido que el mencionado Contrato Individual de Trabajo ha quedado renovado en su ampliación de término a que se refiere el cláusula anterior, con el conocimiento y consentimento del Gobierno de México.

Los términos y condiciones del Contrato original, Individual de Trabajo, tal y como se encuentran previstos, continuarán en efecto durante el período que fija la presente ampliación y de una manera immodificable e inalterable, excepto cuando las partes contratantes lo convengan y expresen por excrito.

Esá extension es de acuerdo con el tráto official del Secretaría del Trabajo y Previsión Social numero 6233, féchado el 24 de Noviembre, 1942, y firmado por Lic. Luis Fernandez del Campo, Director Previsión Social.

Dated this day of - Hecho a _____ de ___________, 19___

El Trabajador - Worker.

____________________

Los Estados Unidos de America - United States of America

Por- By ____________________

____________________

Titulo Oficial - Official Title.

FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

[Procedure Manual. Mexican Farm Labor Transportation Program]

Instructions to Field Supervisors, Farm Labor Transportation Program


1

TO: FIELD SUPERVISORS, FARM LABOR TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM
FROM: MYER COHEN, ASSISTANT REGIONAL DIRECTOR, MA
SUBJECT: INSTRUCTIONS

(10/3/42)

I. There shall be established in each area of employment a Field Office under the direction of a Field Supervisor charged with responsibility for:>

  • A. Receiving transported workers at the point of destination.
  • B. Seeing that transportation from the point of destination to housing which has been properly certified is provided by the responsible grower.
  • C. Visiting each grower's camp as soon as possible after arrival of the workers to:
    • 1. See that the workers are properly housed.
    • 2. See that proper arrangements have been made for board.
    • 3. Explain both to the growers and to the workers the working relationships established by means of contracts signed by them respectively with the Farm Security Administration.
  • D. Seeing that the grower understands thoroughly the preparation of the time and earnings reports.
  • E. Seeing that the workers understand the system of time and earnings reports.
  • F. Receiving complaints from growers and/or workers, and attempting wherever possible to mediate informally such matters.
  • G. Reporting to the Assistant Regional Director, MA grievances of any kind whatsoever which cannot be satisfactorily settled at the field level. Matters pertaining particularly to Labor Relations will be brought immediately to the attention of the Labor Relations Advisor by the Assistant Regional Director, MA. These reports should be submitted in duplicate from the field.
  • H. Making the necessary arrangements through the local office of the AWH&MA for such medical care as workers may need other than compensable injuries.
  • I. Obtaining emergency subsistence grants for workers during illness or unemployment if, in the opinion of the Field Supervisor, such need exists.
  • J. Receiving and auditing Time and Earnings Reports.

  • 2
  • K. Submitting data on each worker at the conclusion of the employment period indicating the number of days he has been employed, and specifically whether he has been employed (in days) 75% of the period of employment as designated in the contract between the FSA and California Field Crops, Inc.
  • L. Submitting to the Assistant Regional Director, MA a certified statement as to the gross earnings of each individual worker. The listing of workers should include both the name and the address in Mexico.
  • M. Maintaining on the reverse side of the Selection Card for each worker the name and address of the grower employing him for each successive period.
  • N. Reporting by telegram or telephone to the Assistant Regional Director, MA any worker whose whereabouts are unknown to the grower during working hours; and any worker who becomes involved in difficulties with local civil authorities.
  • O. Contacting local police officials to explain the terms of the agreement between the Government of the United States and the Republic of Mexico, under which workers are being brought to the locality, and requesting from these local officials their cooperation in enforcing our obligations under this agreement.

II. In connection with receiving transported workers at the point of destination it is anticipated that the following stops will occur:

  • 1. Two days before the train leaves Mexico City, Frank Brown will wire to San Francisco:
    • A. The date and time of departure of the train from Mexico City.
    • B. The number of workers on the train.
    • C. Confirmation as to the destination points at which workers will be discharged.
    • D. Routing from Mexico City to point of final destination.
    • E. Anticipated time of arrival at first point of destination.
    • F. Names of Transportation Agents accompanying train.
  • 2. The information contained in (1) will be transmitted by the regional office to California Field Crops, Inc., to Field Offices of the FSA, and to the State office of the USES.

  • 3
  • 3. California Field Crops will provide the regional office of FSA and the State office of the USES simultaneously with a complete list showing the number of workers to be assigned to each grower at each point of destination, along with the addresses of the growers.
  • 4. Each Field Office will receive the relevant information on this breakdown from the regional office of FSA.
  • 5. When the train actually leaves Mexico City the regional office will be notified, and this information will be relayed to Field Offices, to California Field Crops, Inc., and to the State office of the USES.
  • 6. California Field Crops, Inc. will make arrangements with growers to have transportation available at the points of destination to receive the workers upon their arrival. Field Supervisors of FSA will render any assistance possible in this connection.
  • 7. The Transportation Supervisor will telegraph the regional office at the time the train leaves the American side of the border, indicating expected time of arrival at first point of destination. This information will be passed on to Field Offices, and to California Field Crops, Inc.
  • 8. California Field Crops, Inc. will dispatch a representative to meet the train either at the border or at Los Angeles, with the information referred to under (3) above. This representative and the FSA Transportation Supervisor will, while the train is still en route, assign the workers individually and by groups to growers.
  • 9. Workers will be assisted in finding the proper growers' truck or bus for transportation to housing accommodations. The local USES representative will verify the assignment of workers to growers.
  • 10. The Transportation Agent who leaves the train at the first point of destination will telephone the Field Supervisor at the next point of destination to inform him as to time train leaves first point of destination.

III. Time and Earnings Reports will be prepared and audited as follows:

  • A. Each grower will prepare a Weekly Work Ticket in its four copies for each transported worker whom he is employing. At the close of each day the grower or his foreman will enter on each worker's Ticket the number of hours that worker was employed that day. Fractions of hours to be
    4
    counted to the nearest half hour. This entry will be acknowledged by the worker by initialing or the placing of his mark in the column headed "sig." If the worker is employed less than eight hours on any day or does not work any day, the reason will be indicated in the space provided and if the under-employment was because of the worker's inability or unwillingness to work he will initial the ticket after the reason given. At the end of the week or the completion of a field, whichever occurs first, the worker will be advanced wages for the period involved. He will acknowledge receipt of same by signing the Weekly Work Ticket. The grower will also sign the Ticket and the several copies will then be distributed as follows:
    • 1. Original to worker.
    • 2. First carbon to sugar company to be forwarded to FSA Field Office.
    • 3. Second carbon to the sugar company.
    • 4. Third carbon to the grower.
  • B. The local sugar company will post Weekly Work Tickets for individual workers to a Time and Earnings Report for each crew of workers. Upon the completion of a field or block the sugar company will compute the exact earnings of each crew on a tonnage basis, pro rate this by workers on an hourly basis and determine the balance due each worker over and above the advances made to him. The copy of this report will be forwarded to the FSA Field Office and a copy to the grower.
  • C. On the basis of the computations shown on the Time and Earnings Report the grower will pay workers the balance due, make out a final Earnings Report for each worker and get the necessary signatures on same. Copies of this form will then be distributed in the same manner as copies of the Weekly Work Ticket.
  • D. Field Supervisors will be responsible for auditing these various reports as follows:
    • 1. Weekly Work Ticket
      • (a) Verify the total of hours worked
      • (b) Check for initialing or mark under "sig."
      • (c) Check the computation of 10 percent withheld
      • (d) Check board charges against approved maximum
      • (e) Check for signatures

    • 5
    • 2. Time and Earnings Report
      • (a) Verify entries from Weekly Work Tickets
      • (b) Verify from growers' weight tickets the tonnage yielded and tonnage credited to the crew
      • (c) Verify acreage if any doubt
      • (d) Verify computation of crew earnings on a tonnage basis
      • (e) Verify pro ration by hours
      • (f) Verify computation of 10 percent withheld
      • (g) Verify the net earnings due each worker
      • (h) Check for inclusion of all crew members' names on report.
    • 3. Final Earnings Report
      • (a) Verify figures transferred from Time and Earnings Report
      • (b) Check for signatures
  • E. Weekly Work Tickets and final Earnings Reports for each worker should be filed in the card pocket provided for records on that worker and the card pockets filed alphabetically in the file box provided. The selection card for each worker should also be filed in the same card pocket. This will provide for each worker at all times the complete history on that worker.
  • F. The accumulated number of days worked should be kept as a running record on the Weekly Work Tickets for each worker, in the blank space immediately below the total number of hours for the week. By maintaining the accumulated number of days worked it will be possible at any time for any particular worker to determine what proportion of his employment period he has worked. Similarly, the accumulated gross earnings of each worker should be kept as a running record on the final Earnings Report for each worker in the blank space immediately below "total earnings." In this way it will be possible at any time to determine how much credit each worker has coming to him under the 10 percent withheld.

6

Field Supervisors are charged with responsibility of checking all phases of labor relations within their respective areas. A Labor Relations Check List, Form IX-533, has been prepared and mimeographed for this purpose and to serve as a report to the Management and Labor Divisions of the Regional Office.

Field Supervisors or assistants should visit working crews as often as feasible and at intervals of not to exceed ten days to observe living and working conditions, to check compliance with contract provisions, to become cognizant of all sources of dissatisfaction on the part of workers, to adjust such minor grievances or disputes as can be satisfactorily handled on the ground or with the Area Representative of Field Crops, Inc., and to report to the Regional Office any disputes or grievances which may require negotiations between the FSA and Field Crops, Inc. or administrative action by the Regional Director.

Immediately upon arrival in the respective area, Supervisors should inspect living quarters on ranches where workers are to be assigned to determine whether the quarters are satisfactory; whether cots and pads are available and what arrangements have been made for feeding the crews.

You are to notify the Regional Office immediately of any deficiencies in facilities or any unsatisfactory conditions found in order that remedial steps may be taken before workers arrive. It is particularly important that rates charged for board and the availability of facilities for workers to board themselves be noted and reported promptly.

It is also important that during the first week or ten days after workers have arrived the crews be visited daily, or as frequently as possible, in order that workers and farmers may be afforded maximum assistance during the initial period of adjustment.

Check List Form IX-533 is to be filled out on the occasion of each visit and mailed to the Regional Office at the end of each week; the original copy going to the Assistant Regional Director, MA; 1st copy to the Labor Relations Division 2nd copy to be retained in your office. You are to make any necessary adjustments on the ground where possible and are accordingly authorized to negotiate with growers or their representative or the local representative of Field Crops, Inc. for this purpose, reporting the nature of the problem, your action, and final disposition of the matter to the Regional Office. All disagreements or unsatisfactory conditions which can not be satisfactorily adjusted locally are to be immediately reported in all essential details to the MA and LR Divisions of the Regional Office for further action. Telegraph or telephone should be used when necessity for fast action is indicated.

A representative of the Labor Relations Division will visit the various work areas where transported workers are employed as often as is feasible and will be available for travel to any area where special assistance is needed to iron out difficulties which you can not settle satisfactorily.


1

ROUTINE FOR THE SELECTION AND TRANSPORTATION OF MEXICAN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
Regional Instruction 478.3-A
REGION IX
(Section VI)
DISTRIBUTION: REGIONAL OFFICE: Regional Director's Staff: Sec. Chiefs & Adm. Asst. RR; Section Chfs. & Adm. Asst. MA & FLT; Dist. Engineer. OTHER OFFICES: Regional Attorney; Finance Area Office, Denver; Spec. Agent in Charge. FIELD OFFICES: State Directors; Area Spects; Area HM Supvrs; Dist. Supvrs; County Offices (except Utah, Nevada & Hawaii); Farm Labor Supply Centers; Farm Labor Supply Center Mobile Units; MA Projects.
(2-23-43)

VI SUBSISTENCE:

A Type of Grants:

Subsistence grants may be made to a transported Mexican worker while in transit to the area of employment, during the period of employment, or when repatriated to point of origin. These three types of subsistence grants are distinguished in the cost accounting of the Farm Labor Transportation Program and also in the conditions in which they may be authorized. It is the obligation of the FSA to pay all subsistence costs of transporting workers to and from Mexico and between areas of employment in the United States. However, during the period of employment, subsistence grants may be authorized only in special cases where the worker cannot provide for himself from his own earnings. Such circumstances might include long stretches of bad weather, illness, etc.

B Subsistence Standards:

1 From Points of Origin to Area of Employment: Meals will ordinarily be furnished by the railroad through arrangement with the FSA. No grant disbursements should be necessary except for critical contingencies such as medical attention or breakdown of facilities. In such cases, the amount of the grant will be determined by the circumstances.

2 Repatriation to Points of Origin: When a single worker is repatriated, he will receive a cash grant for meals in transit at the rate of $2.00 a day in the United States and $1.00 a day in Mexico. When workers are repatriated in groups by a special railway coach, arrangements will be made with the railroad to furnish meals as far as the border instead of the $2.00 a day grant.

3 During Employment Period:

a During this time, the worker is expected to make his own living in every sense of the word. Subsistence grants will be authorized on the same basis as grants to domestic agricultural workers. They will be authorized by an FSA field employee.

b When a transported Mexican worker applies for an emergency subsistence grant, an examination will be made of his net earnings during the 12 working days immediately preceding. Fifty percent (50%) of his net earnings during the preceding 12 working days will be considered available to the worker for his own support at the rate of $2.00 per day, and no subsistence grant will be made to a worker until this amount has been expended at this rate by the worker for his own support.


2

c This standard permits him to send one half of his net earnings to dependents in Mexico continually; and it places on the worker a responsibility to put aside money for an emergency. This obligation should be carefully explained to every group of Mexican workers received. The 50% of not earnings will be calculated as the remainder, after the deduction of the 10% retain, charges for board, and any other legal deductions have been made. Earnings will be determined from the weekly payrolls.

d For workers arriving from Mexico: In any case in which workers arrived at point of destination from Mexico make application for emergency subsistence grants, the period for two weeks preceding their arrival at the point of destination should be regarded as a period of unemployment in the determination of need.

After the worker arriving from Mexico has had twelve working days of employment, the issuance of subsistence shall be based on B-3-b above. Working days are considered as those days, excluding Sundays, on which the worker had either (1) eight hours employment, or (2) ten hours employment based on the addition of hours less than eight in any one day to hours less than eight in any other day or days.

Careful records shall be kept of the name and number of each worker receiving subsistence, together with the name and address of the grower to whom he is assigned. At the end of the contract period, a careful calculation shall be made to determine whether or not the period of unemployment above referred to, plus other periods of unemployment, is greater than 25% of the contract period, in which case the employer shall pay the Farm Security Administration $3.00 a day for each day more than 25% of the work days for which the worker was so unemployed, and the Farm Security Administration will reimburse the worker the additional amount due him representing the difference between the subsistence payment and the $3 guarantee.

C Disbursement Procedure:

1 Authorization: Mexican applicants for subsistence grants should be investigated by an FSA field employee. Upon determining that a subsistence grant is justified, the person making the investigation will authorize a grant in a suitable amount on Form IX-564, "Authorization and Receipt for Individual Grant."

2 Disbursement: The Agent-Cashier will accept the signed authorization as his order to make a disbursement. The Agent-Cashier will have the recipient sign the Form IX-564 receipt, which then becomes a subvoucher in his account. All items except signatures on the receipt form should be typewritten, if possible.

3 Group Grants: When more than two persons are to receive identical grants, particularly when groups of workers are being repatriated, Form IX-563, "Authorization and Receipt for Group Grant", may be used in place of Form IX-564. The names and numbers of the recipients will be listed on the form and the amount typewritten opposite the names. Each recipient will then sign and receive his grant.


1

Exhibit A: AUTHORIZATION & RECEIPT FOR INDIVIDUAL GRANT

Form IX-564
(2-23-43)
Regional Instruction 478.3-A
(Section VI)
United States Department of Agriculture
Farm Security Administration
Farm Labor Transportation Program

                       
TYPE OF GRANT  Sub-Voucher _____ 
1. Transportation to Employment _____  Date __________19_____ 
2. Subsistence during Employment Period_____ 
3. Repatriation to Point of Origin _____  Location __________ 
AMOUNT OF GRANT ..... $_____  AUTHORIZATION: An indirect subsistence grant in the amount indicated is hereby authorized to the transported agricultural worker signing below. 
WITNESS TO SIGNATURE BY MARK: 
__________  __________ 
(Signature)  (Signature) 
__________  __________ 
(Title)  (Title) 
ACKNOWLEDGE: Total amount indicated received in cash of __________ Agent-Cashier __________ # _____ 


1

Exhibit B: AUTHORIZATION & RECEIPT FOR GROUP GRANT

Form IX-563
(2-23-43)
Regional Instruction 478.3-A
(Section VI)
United States Department of Agriculture
Farm Security Administration
Farm Labor Transportation Program

                       
TYPE OF GRANT  Sub-Voucher # ________ 
1. Transportation to Employment _____  Date __________19____ 
2. Subsistence during Employment Period _____ 
3. Repatriation to Point of Origin _____  Location __________ 
AMOUNT OF GRANT: ..... $_____  AUTHORIZATION: An indirect subsistence grant 
NUMBER OF RECIPIENTS: ..... ______  in the amount indicated is hereby  
TOTAL AMOUNT OF THIS RECEIPT: $_____  authorized to the transported  
agricultural worker signing below. 
__________________
(Signature) 
__________________
(Title) 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: We the undersigned hereby
acknowledge the receipt in
cash of the amounts indicated from
________________ Agent-Cashier 

                                                 
NAME OF RECIPIENT  No.  AMOUNT  SIGNATURE  MARK 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
NOTE: For signatures by mark, 
T O T A L S  Recip's  Amt of  witness signs name and address in  
Receipt  signature space. 

Libro a Mano de Direcciones

Por la Programa de la Importacion de Trabajadores

Campesinos de la Administracion de Seguro Agricolo

Propriedad de

RUTH ..._ WILSON, Sec. del Jefe


1

PROCEDURE MANUAL — CONTENTS —
FARM LABOR TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM

(Mexican Recruitment Crews)
September 8, 1942

  • 1. Statement of Policy for the Recruitment and Employment of Agricultural Workers in the United States.
    Part I - Domestic Workers
    Part II - Mexican Workers
  • 2. FSA Instruction 478.1, Recruitment and Transportation of Domestic Agricultural Workers, Sections I through VIII and XI. (Sections VI, VII, VIII and XI apply equally to Mexican Workers.)
  • 3. FSA Instruction 478.2, Recruitment and Transportation of Mexican Agricultural Workers, Sections I through V.
  • 4. Recruitment of Mexican Workers (Functions of Recruitment Crews).
  • 5. FSA Instruction 478.3, Cash, Collection and Refunds.
  • 6. FSA Instruction 320.1, Instructions for Agent-Cashiers.
  • 7. FSA Instruction 368.2, Project Development and Operating Costs (Transportation Agents and Administrative Assistant only).
  • 8. FSA Instruction 368.5, Cost Accounting for the Program (Transportation Agents and Administrative Assistant only).
  • 9. Mexican Agreement.
  • 10. Diplomatic Notes Between American Embassy and Mexican Minister of Foreign Affairs, August 4 and 5, 1942.
  • 11. President Avila Camacho's Decree.
  • 12. Employment Agreement Contract (Tentative).
  • 13. Work Agreement - Mexican Workers (Tentative).
  • 14. Work Agreement - Domestic Workers (Tentative).

NOTE: Remove and destroy "Procedure for Compliance, Enforcement and Labor Relations Under the Farm Labor Transportation Program", item 7 in old table of contents dated September 1, 1942


1

STATEMENT OF POLICY FOR THE RECRUITMENT AND EMPLOYMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES

PART I. DOMESTIC AGRICULTURAL WORKERS

I. PURPOSE

The War Manpower Commission, on June 22, 1942, issued directives aimed to alleviate urgent agricultural labor shortages. Pursuant thereto the Department of Agriculture was assigned the responsibility for administering a program designed to accomplish this objective. The FSA was designated as the agency within the Department of Agriculture to institute such a program and this statement is intended to set forth the policies to be followed:

To effect satisfactory procedures providing for the transportation and effective utilization of domestic agricultural workers in agricultural employment in the United States on a just and equitable basis, it is deemed essential (a) to define the conditions, procedures and methods of recruitment and placement of domestic agricultural workers, (b) to make provision for their transportation from and return to their place of origin, (c) to establish standards of wages, working conditions, periods of employment, housing conditions and related matters, (d) to provide safeguards insuring adequate protection and fair treatment of domestic agricultural workers and members of their families during the periods of their employment and (e) to establish necessary machinery to effectuate the foregoing objectives.

II. POLICIES AND PRINCIPLES

A. General

    A. General
  • 1. Domestic agricultural workers shall be recruited and shall be transported exclusively for employment as agricultural workers.
  • 2. Domestic agricultural workers recruited pursuant to the aforementioned program, in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 8802, dated June 25, 1941, shall not suffer discriminatory acts of any kind.

B. Recruitment

    B. Recruitment
  • 1. There shall be no recruiting of domestic agricultural workers for agricultural employment beyond the local area within which such workers then are or ordinarily are employed unless such workers are not required for essential activities within such local area and unless a specific need for their employment beyond such local area has previously been certified to exist by the USES and there shall be no recruiting of domestic agricultural workers for such employment beyond the number certified by the USES to be needed in the area for employment.
  • 2. Certification by the USES shall be based upon determinations:

      2
    • a. That a valid and bona fide application for agricultural workers has been made by responsible potential employers of agricultural workers;
    • b. That the supply of domestic agricultural workers available in the particular area of employment or capable of recruitment by the independent efforts of such potential employers, both in accordance with the standards described in subparagraphs c and e hereof, is inadequate to satisfy their need and that efforts to recruit such workers have proven futile;
    • c. That such potential employers have agreed to meet the standards of wages, working conditions, periods of employment, housing conditions and related requirements prescribed by the FSA and contained in agreements between the FSA and employers covering the employment of domestic agricultural workers;
    • d. That adequate housing, health and sanitary facilities, within the limitations of existing conditions, are certified by the FSA to be available;
    • e. That such potential employers have agreed and have indicated an ability to meet the obligations for transportation and other monetary guarantees required by the FSA; and
    • f. That the crops, for the production, harvesting or marketing of which such domestic agricultural workers are requested, are of importance to the war effort.
  • 3. Domestic agricultural workers shall not be transported into a particular area of employment if the effect thereof will lead to the displacement of domestic agricultural workers within such local area, to the impairment of opportunities for agricultural employment of domestic agricultural workers resident within such area or to the reduction or depression of wages for agricultural workers within such area.
  • 4. Domestic agricultural workers shall be recruited, within the local area within which they are resident, for transportation into a particular area of employment by the USES with the cooperation and assistance of the FSA.

C. Transportation

    C. Transportation
  • 1. Domestic agricultural workers and members of their families shall be transported from points of origin within the local areas in which they reside to original points of destination within the particular area of employment and from such points of destination to intermediate points of destination with in such or other particular areas of employment and return to their points of origin by facilities duly licensed to transport passengers.

  • 3
  • 2. Costs of transportation of domestic agricultural workers and members of their families from points of origin to points of destination and from such points of destination to intermediate points of destination and return to points of origin and all subsistence, medical and other necessary services and facilities provided while en route shall be paid for by the FSA.
  • 3. Personal belongings of domestic agricultural workers and members of their families to a maximum of 75 pounds per person shall be transported at the cost of the FSA.
  • 4. Costs of transportation of domestic agricultural workers, and of members of their families if the transportation thereof should be necessary, from original or intermediate points of destination within a particular area of employment to actual place of employment upon agricultural lands and return to such original or intermediate points of destination shall be paid for by the employers of such domestic agricultural workers.

D. Wages and Conditions of Employment

    D. Wages and Conditions of Employment
  • 1. Domestic agricultural workers shall be paid at the prevailing wage rates within the particular area of employment, provided that in no event shall the prevailing wage rates be less than 30 cents per hour and provided, further, that piece work rates shall be so set as to enable the worker of average ability to earn not less than the prevailing wage.
  • 2. Prevailing wage rates shall be established pursuant to evidence adduced at hearings held by, or submitted by interested parties to, wage boards appointed for such purpose by the Secretary of Agriculture and and composed of two representatives of the Department of Labor, a representative of the War Manpower Commission and two representatives of the Department of Agriculture.
  • 3. No deduction shall be made for commissions, fees or for any other charges, (but not excluding such deductions as may be required by law) which shall have the effect, directly or indirectly, of reducing the wages received by domestic agricultural workers below those provided for in paragraph 1 above.
  • 4. No minor shall be employed, except in compliance with and as permitted by federal and state laws and policies, and no children under 16 years of age shall be transported except as members of families of domestic agricultural workers.
  • 5. Housing, sanitary and medical facilities provided domestic agricultural workers and members of their families shall meet reasonable minimum standards and such additional requirements as may be imposed by the FSA.

  • 4
  • 6. Domestic agricultural workers shall not be required to purchase articles or services for consumption or use by them or members of their families at any source not of their own choosing.
  • 7. Domestic agricultural workers transported into particular areas of employment shall enjoy the rights and privileges, with reference to occupational diseases and accidents, as are afforded under federal and state statutes.
  • 8. The FSA, in cooperation with appropriate federal and state agencies, shall make all necessary provisions for insuring continuous compliance by employers of domestic agricultural workers transported under this program with wage provisions, working conditions, housing, sanitary and other living standards, transportation requirements and all other provisions of employment contracts entered into by such employers and shall provide the necessary machinery for satisfying grievances and resolving disputes.
  • 9. The FSA will enter into agreements with domestic agricultural workers transported under this program which will guarantee employment or, in the absence of employment, the making of a minimum subsistence payment of $3.00 per day, for 75 percent of the work days (Sunday is not a work day) during the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and domestic agricultural workers, provided that the amount of such subsistence payment, if any, as is required to be made under such agreement shall be computed and the payment thereof shall be made at the end of the period of employment; and such agreements will provide, in addition, in the event of need, for the furnishing of subsistence and shelter during the periods of unemployment within the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and a domestic agricultural worker.
  • 10. The agreements entered into by the FSA with domestic agricultural workers transported into particular areas of employment and with employers of such domestic agricultural workers will contain such provisions as, in the opinion of the FSA, may be necessary to effectuate the objectives of the program.

E. Publicity

    E. Publicity
  • 1. The FSA will, together with the USES and appropriate federal agencies give widespread publicity to its program for the transportation of domestic agricultural workers by newspaper statements, radio announcements, and other means.

5

PART II. MEXICAN WORKERS

I. PURPOSE

Pursuant to directives issued by the War Manpower Commission on June 22, 1942, the Department of Agriculture, through the FSA, has instituted a program for the transportation of domestic agricultural workers from local areas within which they reside to particular areas of employment. The Department of Agriculture, through the FSA, is also instituting a supplementary program in no way superseding the portion of the program relative to the transportation of domestic agricultural workers, for the recruitment and employment within the United States of Mexican workers. The statement of policy and procedures hereinafter outlined are limited in their application to Mexican workers admitted to the United States for employment as agricultural workers, pursuant to the understanding arrived at by the Mexican and United States Governments and only after the USES has certified that domestic labor is not available.

To effect satisfactory procedures providing for the transportation and effective utilization of Mexican workers in agricultural employment in the United States on a just and equitable basis, it is deemed essential (a) to define the conditions, procedures and methods of recruitment and placement of Mexican workers; (b) to make provision for their transportation to the United States and return to Mexico and to control their movement within the United States; (c) to establish standards of wages, working conditions, periods of employment, housing conditions and related matters; (d) to provide safeguards insuring adequate protection and fair treatment of Mexican workers and members of their families while within the United States; (e) to establish necessary machinery to effectuate the foregoing objectives.

II. POLICIES AND PRINCIPLES
  • A. General
    • 1. The Mexican and United States Governments understand, with respect to the importation into the United States of Mexican workers for agricultural work that:
      • (a) Mexican workers shall not be subject to the Selective Service Act or to any military service;
      • (b) Mexican workers entering the United States, in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 8802, dated June 25, 1941, shall not suffer discriminatory acts of any kind;
      • (c) Mexican workers entering the United States shall enjoy the guarantees provided in Article 29 of the Mexican Labor Law;

    • 6
    • 2. Mexican workers shall be admitted into the United States, pursuant to the aforementioned understanding, exclusively for employment as agricultural workers and the agreement between the FSA and each individual Mexican worker shall specifically provide that such worker may be employed within the United States solely in agricultural work during the period such worker remains within the United States.
  • B. Recruitment
    • 1. There shall be no recruiting of Mexican workers for agricultural employment within the United States unless specific need for their employment has previously been certified to exist by the USES as provided in subparagraph 2 hereof and there shall be no recruiting of Mexican workers beyond the number certified by the USES to be needed.
    • 2. Certification by the USES shall be based upon determinations:
      • (a) that a valid and bona fide application for workers has been made by responsible potential employers of agricultural workers;
      • (b) that the supply of domestic agricultural workers available in the particular area of employment or capable of recruitment from without such area by the USES under the program outlined in Part I hereof is inadequate to satisfy the need and that efforts to recruit such domestic workers have proven futile;
      • (c) that such potential employers have agreed to meet the standards of wages, working conditions, periods of employment, housing conditions and related requirements stipulated in the understanding between the Mexican and the United States Governments and contained, pursuant to the provisions herein-below set forth, in the agreements between the FSA and employers covering the employment of agricultural workers;
      • (d) that adequate housing, health and sanitary facilities, within the limitation of existing conditions, for the Mexican workers are certified by the FSA to be available;
      • (e) that such potential employers have agreed and have indicated an ability to meet the obligations for transportation and other monetary guarantees required by the FSA; and,
      • (f) that the crops, for the production, harvesting or marketing of which the Mexican workers are requested, are of importance to the war effort.
    • 3. Mexican workers shall not be permitted to enter the United States for agricultural employment if the effect thereof will
      7
      lead to the displacement of domestic agricultural workers, to the impairment of opportunities for agricultural employment of domestic agricultural workers or to the reduction or depression of wages for domestic agricultural workers.
    • 4. Mexican workers shall be recruited in Mexico by the FSA, with the cooperation and the assistance of the USES, and in accordance with such limitations as may be imposed by the Mexican Government pursuant to the aforesaid understanding.
  • C. Transportation
    • 1. Mexican workers and members of their families shall be transported from points of origin in Mexico to original points of destination within the United States and from such points of destination to intermediate points of destination and return to their points of origin in Mexico by facilities duly licensed to transport passengers.
    • 2. Costs of transportation of Mexican workers and members of their families from points of origin to points of destination within the United States and from such points of destination to intermediate points of destination and return to Mexico and all subsistence, medical and other necessary services and facilities while en route shall be paid for by the FSA.
    • 3. Personal belongings of Mexican workers and of members of their families to a maximum of 35 kilos (77 lbs.) per person shall be transported at the cost of the FSA.
    • 4. Costs of transportation of Mexican workers, and of members of their families, if the transportation thereof should be necessary, from original or intermediate points of destination within the United States to actual place of employment upon agricultural lands and return to such original or intermediate points of destination shall be paid for by the employers of the Mexican workers.
  • D. Wages and Conditions of Employment
    • 1. Mexican workers shall be paid at the prevailing wage rates within the particular area of employment, provided that in no event shall the prevailing wage rates be less than 30 cents per hour and provided, further, that piece work rates shall be so set as to enable a worker of average ability to earn not less than the prevailing wage.
    • 2. The prevailing wage rates shall be those wage rates established for domestic workers by the Department of Agriculture pursuant to the procedure provided for under Part I hereof.

  • 8
  • 3. No deductions shall be made for commissions, fees or for any other charges (but not excluding such deductions as may be required by law) which shall have the effect, directly or indirectly, of reducing the wages received by Mexican workers below those provided for in paragraph 1 above.
  • 4. No minor shall be employed, except in compliance with and as permitted by Federal and State laws and policies, and in no event shall any minor under 14 years of age be employed nor any children under 16 years of age be transported except as members of families of Mexican workers.
  • 5. Housing, sanitary and medical facilities and services provided Mexican workers shall meet reasonable minimum standards and such additional requirements as may be imposed by FSA.
  • 6. Mexican workers shall not be required to purchase articles or services for consumption or use by them or members of their families at any source not of their own choosing.
  • 7. Mexican workers shall enjoy the same rights and privileges, insofar as occupational diseases and accidents are concerned, as are afforded domestic agricultural workers under Federal and State statutes.
  • 8. Each group of Mexican workers shall elect their own representatives to deal with employers of agricultural labor provided that all such representatives shall be working members of the group.
  • 9. The FSA, in cooperation with appropriate Federal and State agencies, shall make all necessary provisions for insuring continuous compliance by employers of Mexican workers with wage provisions, working conditions, housing, sanitary and other living standards, transportation and all other provisions of employment contracts entered into by such employers and shall provide the necessary machinery for satisfying grievances and resolving disputes.
  • 10. The FSA will enter into agreements with Mexican workers transported under this program which will guarantee employment, or, in the absence of employment, the making of a minimum subsistence payment of $3.00 per day, for 75 percent of the work days (Sunday is not a work day) during the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and Mexican workers, provided that the amount of such subsistence payment, if any, as is required to be made under such agreement shall be computed and the payment thereof shall be made at the end of the period of employment; and such agreements will provide, in addition, in the event of need, for the furnishing of subsistence and shelter during the periods of unemployment within the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and a Mexican worker.

  • 9
  • 11. The agreements entered into by the FSA with Mexican workers and with employers of such Mexican workers will contain such provisions as, in the opinion of the FSA, may be necessary to effectuate the objectives of the program.

1

RECRUITMENT AND TRANSPORTATION OF DOMESTIC AGRICULTURAL WORKERS

FSA Instruction 478.1

I PURPOSE:

To make provision for an adequate supply and distribution of agricultural workers for the production and harvesting of agricultural crops essential to the war effort, the FSA, and the United States Employment Service have undertaken a joint program to recruit and transport domestic agricultural workers from areas of labor supply and place them in areas of urgent labor shortage.

II POLICIES:

A Recruitment.

    A Recruitment.
  • 1 Domestic agricultural workers shall be recruited by the USES with the cooperation and assistance of the FSA, and shall be transported exclusively for employment as agricultural workers.
  • 2 There will be no recruiting of less than 100 workers for any particular employer or group of employers or for any work period comprising less than 30 days, and there will be no recruiting of workers for transportation from any point within 200 miles from the place of employment.
  • 3 There shall be no recruiting of domestic agricultural workers for agricultural employment beyond the local area within which such workers then are or ordinarily are employed unless such workers are not required for essential activities within such local area and unless a specific need for their employment beyond such local area has previously been certified to exist by the USES and there shall be no recruiting of domestic agricultural workers for such employment beyond the number certified by the USES to be needed in the area for employment.
  • 4 Certification by the USES shall be based upon determinations that:
    • a A valid and bona fide application for agricultural workers has been made by responsible potential employers of agricultural workers;
    • b The supply of domestic agricultural workers available in the particular area of employment or capable of recruitment by the independent efforts of such potential employers, both in accordance with the standards described in subparagraphs c and e hereof, is inadequate to satisfy their need and that efforts to recruit such workers have proven futile;

  • 2-rev.
  • [Note to reader: Section II(B), parts 1-3 are missing from folder.]4 Costs of transportation of domestic agricultural workers, and of members of their families if the transportation thereof should be necessary, from original or intermediate points of destination within a particular area of employment to actual place of employment upon agricultural lands and return to such original or intermediate points of destination shall be paid for by the employers of such domestic agricultural workers.
  • 5 Employers will be required to pay to the FSA the sum of $5 per worker for each worker transported by the FSA irrespective of the distance such worker may be transported. No charge will be made for the transportation of any member of the worker's family who is not a worker. (Rev. 9-10-42)

C Wages and Conditions of Employment.

    C Wages and Conditions of Employment.
  • 1 Domestic agricultural workers shall be entitled to freedom from discrimination in employment because of race, creed, color, or national origin, in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 8802 of the President of The United States, dated June 25, 1941.
  • 2 Domestic agricultural workers shall be paid at not less than the prevailing wage rates within the particular area of employment, provided that in no event shall the wage rates paid be less than 30 cents per hour and provided, further, that piece work rates shall be so set as to enable the worker of average ability to earn not less than the prevailing hourly wage. (Rev. 9-10-42)
  • 3 Prevailing wage rates shall be established pursuant to evidence adduced at hearings held by, or submitted by interested parties to, wage boards appointed for such purpose by the Secretary of Agriculture and composed of one representative of the United States Employment Service, a representative of the War Manpower Commission and two representatives of the Department of Agriculture.
  • 4 No deduction shall be made for commissions, fees or for any other charges, (but not excluding such deductions as may be required by law) which shall have the effect, directly or indirectly, of reducing the wages received by domestic agricultural workers below those provided for in paragraph II C 2 above.
  • 5 No minor shall be employed, except in compliance with and as permitted by federal and state laws and policies, and no children under 16 years of age shall be transported except as members of families of domestic agricultural workers.
  • 6 Housing, sanitary and medical facilities provided domestic agricultural workers and members of their families shall meet reasonable minimum standards and such additional requirements as may be imposed by the FSA.

  • [2-rev. verso]
  • 7 Domestic agricultural workers shall not be required to purchase articles or services for consumption or use by them or members of their families at any source not of their own choosing.
  • 8 Domestic agricultural workers transported into particular areas of employment shall enjoy the rights and privileges, with reference to occupational diseases and accidents, as are afforded under federal and state statutes.
  • 9 The FSA, in cooperation with appropriate federal and state agencies, shall make all necessary provisions for insuring continuous compliance by employers of domestic agricultural workers transported under this program with wage provisions, working conditions, housing, sanitary and other living standards, transportation requirements and all other provisions of employment contracts entered into by such employers and shall provide the necessary machinery for satisfying grievances and resolving disputes.
  • 10 The FSA will enter into agreements with domestic agricultural workers transported under this program which will guarantee employment or, in the absence of employment, the making of a minimum subsistence payment of $3.00 per day, for 75 percent of the work days (Sunday is not a work day) during the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and a domestic agricultural worker, provided that the amount of such subsistence payment, if any, as is required to be made under such agreement shall be computed and the payment thereof shall be made at the end of the period of employment; and such agreements will provide, in addition, in the event of need, for the furnishing of subsistence and shelter during the periods of unemployment within the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and a domestic agricultural worker.
  • 11 For the purpose of determining compliance under the preceding paragraph, a work day shall contain not less than eight hours nor more than twelve hours; provided, however, that for the purpose of determining whether any minimum subsistence payments are to be made, the Government may, in its discretion, add hours of work done less than eight done on any day except Sunday, and for such purpose each ten hours of work shall be counted as a work day. (Rev. 9-10-42)
  • 12 The agreements entered into by the FSA with domestic agricultural workers transported into particular areas of employment and with employers of such domestic agricultural workers will contain such provisions as, in the opinion of the FSA, may be necessary to effectuate the objectives of the program.
  • 13 The workers are not employees of the United States Government and are not entitled to the benefits of the United States Employees' Compensation Act of September 7, 1916 as amended. (Added 9-10-42)

B (cont.)


    2
    B (cont.)
  • [Note to reader: Section II(B), parts 1-3 are missing from folder.]4 Costs of transportation of domestic agricultural workers, and of members of their families if the transportation thereof should be necessary, from original or intermediate points of destination within a particular area of employment to actual place of employment upon agricultural lands and return to such original or intermediate points of destination shall be paid for by the employers of such domestic agricultural workers.
  • 5 Employers will be required to pay to the FSA the sum of $5 per worker for each worker transported by the FSA irrespective of the distance such worker may be transported. No charge will be made for the transportation of any member of the worker's family who is not a worker.

C Wages and Conditions of Employment.

    C Wages and Conditions of Employment.
  • 1 Domestic agricultural workers shall be entitled to freedom from discrimination in employment because of race, creed, color, or national origin, in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 8802 of the President of The United States, dated June 25, 1941.
  • 2 Domestic agricultural workers shall be paid at the prevailing wage rates within the particular area of employment, provided that in no event shall the prevailing wage rates be less than 30 cents per hour and provided, further, that piece work rates shall be so set as to enable the worker of average ability to earn not less than the prevailing wage.
  • 3 Prevailing wage rates shall be established pursuant to evidence adduced at hearings held by, or submitted by interested parties to, wage boards appointed for such purpose by the Secretary of Agriculture and composed of one representative of the United States Employment Service, a representative of the War Manpower Commission and two representatives of the Department of Agriculture.
  • 4 No deduction shall be made for commissions, fees or for any other charges, (but not excluding such deductions as may be required by law) which shall have the effect, directly or indirectly, of reducing the wages received by domestic agricultural workers below those provided for in paragraph II C 2 above.
  • 5 No minor shall be employed, except in compliance with and as permitted by federal and state laws and policies, and no children under 16 years of age shall be transported except as members of families of domestic agricultural workers.
  • 6 Housing, sanitary and medical facilities provided domestic agricultural workers and members of their families shall meet reasonable minimum standards and such additional requirements as may be imposed by the FSA.

  • [2 verso]
  • 7 Domestic agricultural workers shall not be required to purchase articles or services for consumption or use by them or members of their families at any source not of their own choosing.
  • 8 Domestic agricultural workers transported into particular areas of employment shall enjoy the rights and privileges, with reference to occupational diseases and accidents, as are afforded under federal and state statutes.
  • 9 The FSA, in cooperation with appropriate federal and state agencies, shall make all necessary provisions for insuring continuous compliance by employers of domestic agricultural workers transported under this program with wage provisions, working conditions, housing, sanitary and other living standards, transportation requirements and all other provisions of employment contracts entered into by such employers and shall provide the necessary machinery for satisfying grievances and resolving disputes.
  • 10 The FSA will enter into agreements with domestic agricultural workers transported under this program which will guarantee employment or, in the absence of employment, the making of a minimum subsistence payment of $3.00 per day, for 75 percent of the work days (Sunday is not a work day) during the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and a domestic agricultural worker, provided that the amount of such subsistence payment, if any, as is required to be made under such agreement shall be computed and the payment thereof shall be made at the end of the period of employment; and such agreements will provide, in addition, in the event of need, for the furnishing of subsistence and shelter during the periods of unemployment within the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and a domestic agricultural worker.
  • 11 For the purpose of determining compliance under the preceding paragraph, a work day shall contain not less than eight hours nor more than twelve hours; provided, however, that for the purpose of determining whether any minimum subsistence payment of $3 per day is to be made, the Government may, in its discretion, add hours of work done on any day less than a work day (as above defined) to hours of work done on other days (other than Sunday) not constituting work days and for such purposes each ten hours of work shall be counted as a work day.
  • 12 The agreements entered into by the FSA with domestic agricultural workers transported into particular areas of employment and with employers of such domestic agricultural workers will contain such provisions as, in the opinion of the FSA, may be necessary to effectuate the objectives of the program.

3

III DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITIES AMONG GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

A The FSA will be responsible for:

    A The FSA will be responsible for:
  • 1 Advising growers, farmers and other employers of agricultural workers, and all other interested persons of the program for the recruitment and transportation of domestic agricultural workers;
  • 2 Determining the adequacy of housing facilities in areas of employment into which domestic agricultural workers are to be transported;
  • 3 Assembling data with reference to prevailing wage rates for submission to wage boards;
  • 4 Approving (upon certification by USES) requests for the transportation of domestic agricultural workers into areas of employment;
  • 5 Entering into work agreements for specified periods of employment with recruited domestic agricultural workers and into cooperative employment agreements with employers of recruited agricultural workers;
  • 6 Arranging for transportation of recruited agricultural workers, members of their families, and personal belongings from points of origin within areas of recruitment to areas of employment and return to points of origin, and providing subsistence, medical care and other facilities and services while enroute;
  • 7 Providing migratory labor camps and other FSA housing facilities for recruited agricultural workers to the extent available;
  • 8 Providing subsistence and medical care to recruited agricultural workers during periods of unemployment when need therefor exists;
  • 9 Insuring compliance and enforcement of cooperative employment agreements, and providing machinery for satisfying grievances and resolving disputes;
  • 10 Guaranteeing employment or payments in lieu thereof for 75 percent of the work days during specified periods of employment;
  • 11 Providing general supervision of the entire recruitment and transportation program.

B The United States Employment Service will be responsible for:

    B The United States Employment Service will be responsible for:
  • 1 Assisting the FSA in advising growers, farmers and other employers of agricultural workers, and all other interested persons of the program for the recruitment and transportation of domestic agricultural workers;

  • [3 verso]
  • 2 Receiving requests for agricultural workers from potential employers;
  • 3 Determining the availability of domestic agricultural workers in the area of employment;
  • 4 Certifying as to the need of transporting agricultural workers from areas of recruitment to alleviate agricultural labor shortages in a particular area of employment;
  • 5 Determining the willingness of potential employers making application for agricultural workers to meet and satisfy the requirements of the recruitment and transportation program;
  • 6 Determining the availability of the required number of domestic agricultural workers in areas beyond the area of employment;
  • 7 Recruiting domestic agricultural workers to fill approved applications and arranging for their assembly at centers within areas of recruitment;
  • 8 Receiving the recruited agricultural workers at the point of destination and assigning them to the employers.

C The Office of Defense Transportation will be responsible for:

    C The Office of Defense Transportation will be responsible for:
  • 1 Assisting the FSA in negotiating for rates for transportation of recruited agricultural workers;
  • 2 Assisting the FSA in obtaining necessary facilities for transportation of recruited agricultural workers.

D State and County War Boards will be responsible for:

    D State and County War Boards will be responsible for:
  • 1 Assisting the FSA in advising growers, farmers and other employers of agricultural workers, and all other interested persons of the program for the recruitment and transportation of domestic agricultural workers;
  • 2 Making arrangements for holding and giving public notice of wage board hearings to determine prevailing wages;
  • 3 Supplying data concerning prevailing wage rates and making recommendations to wage boards as to specific area or areas for which prevailing wage rates are to be determined;

  • 4
  • 4 Assisting the FSA in securing compliance with and enforcement of both work and cooperative employment agreements entered into by the FSA with recruited agricultural workers and employers.

IV FUNCTIONAL ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES WITHIN THE FSA:

A Management Functions.

1 The recruitment and transportation program will be conducted largely on a non-regionalized basis with the Management Division, Washington, D. C., responsible for its operation. The Director of the Management Division, or his designee, will be responsible for supervising, coordinating and rendering technical advice upon all phases of the program. All responsibility for transportation of workers and members of their family will rest with the Director of the Management Division, or his designee, and be performed by field staffs especially appointed for such purpose. The regional offices will, however, be responsible for certification as to the adequacy of housing, sanitary and health facilities, for the assembling of data with reference to prevailing wage rates and for the supervision of all relationships (other than auditing payrolls and wage payments), between employers and workers after their arrival at points of destination and assignment to employers and until their departure from such original points of destination for transportation to intermediate points of destination or return to points of origin.

2 For purposes of operation, areas will be designated as areas of employment and areas of recruitment. Field staffs, or more properly, transportation crows, will be assigned by the Management Division, Washington, D. C., as needed to these areas to perform necessary duties in connection with the program. In general, each transportation crew will consist of one Transportation supervisor, one Transportation assistant (Finance), and one or more other Transportation assistants with such supplemental clerical assistance as may be required. All transportation crew personnel will be responsible to the Chief, Migratory Labor section, Washington, D. C., will be moved from area to area at his direction and will keep such records and make such reports as may be required by him. One, probably the Transportation assistant (Finance), or more members of a transportation crew in the area of employment will be assigned to remain with the group of recruited workers to check payrolls and wage payments, make collections, if any, from the employer, assist in processing vouchers, provide subsistence and subsistence payments in lieu of employment and make all necessary financial arrangements preliminary to assembly and transportation of the workers from the original point of destination within the area of employment to intermediate points of destination or return to point of origin.


[4 verso]

V GENERAL ROUTINE:

The following is a summary statement of the chronological sequence of the steps to be taken from the receipt of an application or request for agricultural workers to their return to the place of origin. Some of the steps hereinafter set forth, which in the narration may appear to be successive in point of time, can and will be taken simultaneously. It is anticipated that each agency will attempt to complete its portion of the work as rapidly as possible and, except for the making of final commitments, without regard to whether subsequent steps have or have not been taken by other agencies. Moreover, in some instances, it may be that the actual taking of some of the steps may be avoided because of work already done or information already obtained by a particular agency.

A A request from an employer for agricultural workers will be received by a local employment office of the USES. That office, hereinafter called the "order-holding office", will proceed to attempt to fill such requests by exhausting all sources of supply within a radius of two hundred miles of the area of employment. If it appears that it will be necessary to transport agricultural workers in order to fill the request, the order-holding office will determine whether the employer wishes that agricultural workers be recruited and transported and whether the conditions and requirements of the recruitment and transportation program will be satisfied. (This should be done at the time the original request is received and while attempts to recruit locally are being made.) The order-holding office, USES, will notify the Regional Director, FSA, of the number of workers needed, the period of employment, the area of employment, the probable wage rates, the housing facilities indicated by the employer to be made available by him, the crops for the production or harvesting of which the workers are needed, and all other pertinent data. The order-holding office will, at the same time, advise the USES State and Regional Offices of the probable labor shortage so that such offices may attempt to locate available labor supplies and determine upon areas of recruitment.

B Immediately upon receiving such notice from the order-holding office, USES, the Regional Director, FSA, will direct the regional LR specialist to make an inspection of the housing, sanitation and health facilities indicated by the employer to be made available by him and other housing, sanitary and health facilities in the area of employment. The Regional Director will also request the Administrator, Washington, D. C., to request the Secretary of Agriculture to appoint a wage board for the purpose of holding hearings concerning prevailing wages and will request the regional LR specialist to assemble data concerning prevailing wage rates for submission to the wage board. The regional LR specialist, with the assistance of the regional Chief, Migratory Labor Camp section, and the regional representative of the Office of the Engineer, will make an inspection of the housing, sanitary and health facilities in the area of employment and report to the Regional Director his determination as to the adequacy of such facilities. The regional LR specialist will also assemble data as to prevailing wage rates.


5

C The Secretary of Agriculture will appoint the wage board. Upon being advised of the appointment of the wage board, the Regional Director will request the State USDA War board to fix the time and place of hearing and to give public notice thereof. The wage board will hold a public hearing, receive evidence from all interested persons, including the regional LR specialist, make determinations as to prevailing wage rates and certify its findings to the Secretary of Agriculture. Certified copies of such certification will be transmitted to the State USDA War Board and the Regional Director, FSA.

D The Regional Director will advise the order-holding office, USES, of the determinations concerning the adequacy of housing facilities and prevailing wage rates.

E The order-holding office, if it has in the meantime determined that it will be necessary to transport workers, will then request the State Director, USES, to request the regional Representative, USES, to certify the existence of an acute labor shortage and the need for transporting agricultural workers. The regional Representative, USES, will certify the existence of a labor shortage and the need for transporting workers, will determine areas of recruitment and will notify the Director, USES, Washington, D. C., of such certification, the areas of recruitment, the determinations concerning housing facilities and prevailing wages, the number of workers needed, the period of employment, the place of employment, the crops for which workers are requested and all other related data.

F The Director, USES, will notify the Administrator, FSA, For the attention of the Director MA Division, of the certifications and determinations referred to. The Director, MA Division will then determine whether to approve or disapprove the transportation of the requested number of workers into the area of employment. If the Director, MA Division approves the recruitment and transportation of domestic agricultural workers, he will notify the Director, USES, and in turn the regional Representative, the State Director, and the order-holding office of the USES will be notified, as well as the local employment offices, USES, in the area or areas of recruitment. The Director, MA Division, FSA, will also notify the Transportation supervisor, FSA, in the area of employment to enter into cooperative employment agreements with the employer requesting the agricultural workers. (Rev. 9-10-42)

G When the cooperative employment agreements have been executed, the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment will notify the Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment and the order-holding office, USES, who will notify the local employment offices, USES, in the area or areas of recruitment. Such employment offices will recruit the required number of workers and arrange for their assembly for transportation. The Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment will designate a transportation assistant to work with the employment office, USES, and to enter into a work agreement with each worker who is recruited.


[5-rev. verso]

H The Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment will make arrangements with the transportation company for transportation facilities to be available at the points of assembly and for food and subsistence at such points and while enroute. The Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment will notify the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment of the anticipated time of arrival of the recruited workers. A Transportation assistant or assistants will accompany the recruited workers to the point of destination.

I At the point of destination a representative of the USES and the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment will receive the recruited agricultural workers. The USES representative will assign the recruited workers to the employer. The Transportation supervisor in the area of employment will see that the recruited workers are provided with the housing, sanitation and health facilities previously determined to be available and will provide for necessary subsistence.

J The regional LR specialist will designate a member of his staff or of the regional Migratory Camp section to supervise the work relations between the recruited agricultural workers and the employer. Such designee, together with a Transportation assistant, area of employment, who will check the employer's payroll records and wage payments, will ascertain whether there is compliance with the employment and living conditions of the agreements and the program. If during the period of employment, disputes or conflicts arise between the employer and the workers or there is evidence of non-compliance on the part of either, the regional LR specialist will take the steps necessary to place the compliance, enforcement and mediation machinery into effect.

K Prior to the end of the employment period, the regional LR specialist will notify the order-holding office, USES, of the impending termination of the employment period. If, following the procedure hereinabove outlined, such workers (or any of them) are to be employed for an additional period, certifications to such effect will be made. The routine set forth will be followed except that it will be unnecessary to recruit such workers and to enter into work agreements and, if they are to be employed in the same or a nearby area of employment, it may be unnecessary to arrange for their transportation. If it becomes necessary to transport such workers to a new area of employment or to return them to their place of origin, the Transportation supervisor, area of employment, and his assistants will perform the functions originally performed by the Transportation supervisor, area of recruitment, and will assemble the workers and members of their families, make arrangements for transportation facilities and provide for subsistence while enroute. He will also notify the Transportation supervisor in the new area of employment or the Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment of the anticipated arrival of the workers at the new point of destination or the point of origin as the case may be. Upon arrival the workers will be received by a representative of the USES and the Transportation supervisor who will assist in arranging for their assignment to the new employer and see that shelter and subsistence are available or, if returned to the point of origin, release them for return to their homes. (Rev. 9-10-42)


[5 verso]

H The Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment will make arrangements with the transportation company for transportation facilities to be available at the points of assembly and for food and subsistence at such points and while enroute. The Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment will notify the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment of the anticipated time of arrival of the recruited workers. A Transportation assistant or assistants will accompany the recruited workers to the point of destination.

I At the point of destination a representative of the USES and the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment will receive the recruited agricultural workers. The USES representative will assign the recruited workers to the employer. The Transportation supervisor in the area of employment will see that the recruited workers are provided with the housing, sanitation and health facilities previously determined to be available and will provide for necessary subsistence.

J The regional LR specialist will designate a member of his staff or of the regional Migratory Camp section to supervise the work relations between the recruited agricultural workers and the employer. Such designee, together with a Transportation assistant, area of employment, who will check the employer's payroll records and wage payments, will ascertain whether there is compliance with the employment and living conditions of the agreements and the program. If during the period of employment, disputes or conflicts arise between the employer and the workers or there is evidence of non-compliance on the part of either, the regional LR specialist will take the steps necessary to place the compliance, enforcement and mediation machinery into effect.

K Prior to the end of the employment period, the regional LR specialist will notify the order-holding office, USES, of the impending termination of the employment period. If, following the procedure hereinabove outlined, such workers (or any of them) are to be employed for an additional period, certifications to such effect will be made. The routine set forth will be followed except that it will be unnecessary to recruit such workers and to enter into work agreements and, if they are to be employed in the same or a nearby area of employment, it may be unnecessary to arrange for their transportation. If it becomes necessary to transport such workers to a new area of employment or to return them to their place of origin, the Transportation supervisor, area of employment, and his assistants will perform the functions originally performed by the Transportation supervisor, area of recruitment, and will assemble the workers and members of their families, make arrangements for transportation facilities and provide for subsistence while enroute. He will also notify the Transportation supervisor in the new area of employment or the Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment of the anticipated arrival of the workers at the new point of destination or the point of origin as the case may be. Upon arrival the workers will be received by the


6
Transportation supervisor who will assist in arranging for their assignment to the new employer and see that shelter and subsistence are available or, if returned to the point of origin, release them for return to their homes.

VI DETERMINATION OF WAGES:

A The Secretary shall appoint a wage board, composed of two representatives from the Department of Agriculture, one from the War Manpower Commission and one from the USES, instruct it to proceed to perform its duties in a designated area and to report its wage determinations and other findings to him.

B Upon the appointment of the wage board, the Regional Director, FSA, shall request the State USDA War Board to designate a place within the area of employment and a time for the holding of such hearings and to give public notice, not less than three days in advance of the hearing, to persons who may be interested. All notices will be given in the name of the Secretary acting by the Chairman of the State USDA War Board.

C Also immediately upon the receipt of notice of the probable need of transporting workers, the Regional Director shall direct the regional LR specialist to undertake an investigation of prevailing wage rates in the area of employment for the various farm operations for which labor is to be recruited. Such findings (including hourly rates, piece rates and workers' time performance if paid on a piece basis) shall be submitted to the wage board for its technical guidance.

D Representatives of employers of agricultural workers, of agricultural workers, of the public and other interested persons shall be given the opportunity of testifying at the wage board hearings.

E The wage board shall be in public session no longer than two days. It shall determine prevailing wages on the basis of the evidence developed at the public hearings or submitted to it by interested persons or groups. The wage board shall make findings and wage determinations of prevailing wage rates and submit such findings and determinations to the Secretary of Agriculture within one day following the termination of the hearing. The recommendations of the majority of the members of the board shall constitute the determination of the entire board. In the event there is no majority, the board shall submit the matter to the Secretary of Agriculture who shall make the final wage determinations.

F The prevailing wage rates as determined by the board, which in no event shall be less than 30 cents an hour, or its equivalent in piece work rates, shall constitute the minimum wage rates for the recruitment and transportation program. Such minimum rates shall be incorporated in the cooperative employment agreement between the FSA and employer as a condition for recruiting and transporting agricultural workers under the program.


[6 verso]

VII INSPECTION OF HOUSING AND SANITARY FACILITIES:

A All certifications as to housing and sanitary facilities must be made by the regional director within not more than six (6) days after notice is received from the order-holding office, USES, that there is a local labor shortage and that an attempt will be made to recruit labor outside the area of employment.

B When instructed by the regional director, FSA, the regional LR specialist, with the assistance of the chief, regional Migratory Labor Camps section and a regional representative of the Office of the Chief Engineer, will inspect the housing and sanitary facilities in the area of employment.

C The regional LR specialist, in making the inspection of the housing and sanitary facilities, will prepare Form FSA 505, "Check Sheet for Inspection of Housing and Sanitary Facilities", (copy attached as Exhibit A) in an original only, and will immediately submit it to the regional director, who will have all check sheets summarized and prepare Form FSA 506, "Advice of Approval of Housing and Sanitary Facilities for Agricultural Workers", (copy attached as Exhibit B) in an original and one copy. The original of Form FSA 506 will be forwarded to the order holding office, USES, and the copy will be filed in the FSA regional office with the supporting check sheets, Form FSA 505.

D Instructions for using Form FSA 505, "Check Sheet for Inspection of Housing and Sanitary Facilities":

1 General: The following material covers only those portions of the form which do not appear to be self-explanatory. The Schedule Number will be assigned by the Inspector for his own record.

2 Section (2) Housing Inspected (A) Location: State the location of the structures covered by the particular Form, in the form of simple directions which would enable a person to locate them quickly. For example:

"Southeastern end of Parker County, two miles south of the Yellow River Bridge, along highway 75, then east at sign marked `Wilson's Dairy' ½ mile on gravel road to large red barn and windmill."

3 Section (3) Employer Intends (A): These figures will be inclusive of any local labor other than furnished under the transportation program.

4 Section (4) Specific Housing (A): The inspector will determine whether there are any state or county laws or regulations applicable to rural housing or sanitation in the area of employment. If there are, he will familiarize himself with them. If upon inspecting the property it seems that violations of such laws or regulations exist, the inspector will determine whether the appropriate local governmental agency has made an


7
inspection recently, and whether the property was approved or not. Without attempting to make a determination for the local governmental agency, the inspector will then form and report his own opinion as to whether the property appears to meet such laws and regulations. If the answer is "no", the inspection will be concluded, with appropriate explanation.

5 Section (4) Specific Housing (B): All groupings of housing at any site will be placed on the same form up to the limit of 10-room and/or cabin units. Separate groupings will be placed on separate forms. In the blocks in this section a check mark or "no" will be used to indicate that the conditions are or are not satisfactory.

6 Section (4) Specific Housing (D): The standard to be used in checking the size of room units will be at least 168 square feet of floor area, with a minimum dimension (length or width) of 12 feet, for each family of four or less members, or each group of three or less single workers. Forty square feet will be added for each additional member of a family, and sixty square feet for single persons. The minimum ceiling height in all cases will be eight feet.

7 Section (4) Specific Housing (E): This is the final determination and will not be made at the time of inspection.

E Instruction for using Form FSA 506, "Advice of Approval of Housing and Sanitary Facilities for Agricultural Workers":

1 Before FSA camp facilities are offered for housing agricultural workers and their families, the regional LR specialist will make arrangements with the chief, regional Migratory Labor Camp section to provide and reserve the facilities offered on Form FSA 506.

2 The description of the type, designation or location of housing units should be sufficiently specific to adequately identify the unit at the site.

F Form FSA 505 and Form FSA 506 are authorized for regional reproduction if and when the transportation program becomes active in the particular region.

Attachments: Exhibits A and B


8

VIII RECRUITMENT AND TRANSPORTATION:

A A Transportation Supervisor and one or more Transportation Assistants will be assigned to the area of recruitment and a similar crew and a Transportation Assistant (Finance) to the area of employment. The Transportation Supervisors will be administratively responsible to the Chief of the Migratory Labor Camp Section, MA Division, Washington, D. C., and responsible for all phases of the program within their assigned areas. The Transportation Assistant (Finance) will be administratively responsible to the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer at Montgomery, Alabama.

B When the Director, USES, Washington, D. C., notifies the Administrator of the certification of need for transported agricultural workers, the contract with the employer has been signed, and the area or areas of recruitment have been defined and the approximate number of persons to be recruited in each area is known, Work and Job Orders will be issued by the Director of the MA Division, Washington, D. C., in accordance with FSA Instruction 368.5 and transmitted to the Transportation Supervisor in the area of employment. Telegraphic advice of the issuance of the Work and Job Orders will be sent to the Transportation Supervisor in the area of recruitment.

C When the telegraphic advice of the Work and Job Orders is received by the Transportation Supervisor in the area of recruitment, he will assign one or more Transportation Assistants to receive, as they are recruited by the USES, transport, and provide subsistence for the workers and their families up to the time they are delivered to the Transportation Assistant at the area of employment. When the Work and Job Orders are received by the Transportation Supervisor in the area of employment, he will assign one Transportation Assistant (Finance) and one or more other Transportation Assistants to arrange for the receipt of transported workers and transportation to their housing facilities in the area of employment, and will give the Work and Job Orders to the Transportation Assistant (Finance) who will be responsible for accumulating the cost information. Transportation Assistants in the area of recruitment will tabulate on the reverse of a Job Order form (memorandum copy) all expenses incurred in transporting and providing subsistence for workers and their families up to the time they are delivered to the point of assembly for through transportation, and will turn this cost data over to the Transportation Assistant who is assigned to accompany the group while in transit by through carrier to the area of employment. The Transportation Assistant who accompanies the group to the area of employment will deliver any accumulated cost data to the Transportation Assistant (Finance) at the area of employment.

D The Transportation Assistants in the area of recruitment will execute on behalf of the Government agreements with recruited workers on Form FSA-500, "Employment Agreement (Domestic Workers)". Form FSA-500 will be executed in an original and one copy, both of which will be signed by both the worker and the Transportation Assistant. The copy will be given to the worker and the original will be retained by the Transportation Assistant for forwarding with the worker to the Transportation Assistant (Finance) in the area of employment. Upon execution of the release by the worker upon his return to the point of recruitment or upon his decision not to return to the area of recruitment, Form FSA-503 or Form FSA-504, whichever is used, will be attached to the original of Form FSA-500 and both


9
will be forwarded to the Communications and Records Section at Montgomery, Alabama, for permanent filing.

E Workers will be expected to assemble at USES Placement Offices at their own expense. They may be transported directly to the area of employment from these locations or assembled at other points for through transportation. The Transportation Assistant will be expected to provide the most economical transportation and in general through transportation should be arranged for in units of one car load or bus load. Rail transportation will be by second class (Coach) accommodations.

F Transportation Assistants should make arrangements for transportation with local railroad and bus officials. If difficulties are experienced the matter will be immediately reported by telegraph or telephone to the Chief, Migratory Labor Camp Section, Washington, D. C., who will enlist the assistance of the Office of Defense Transportation.

G In the interest of economy, although the workers may not be returned to the area of recruitment from the first area of employment, round trip tickets for transportation of workers must be purchased wherever they are available. The Transportation Assistant who accompanies the group to the area of employment will deliver the unused portions of such tickets to the Transportation Assistant (Finance) in the area of employment who will hold them pending return of the workers to the area of recruitment or transportation to another area of employment, from which such tickets cannot be used. Unused portions of tickets for workers who do not wish to return to the area of recruitment or who are transported to such a new area of employment will be forwarded to the Finance Area office at Montgomery, Alabama, for return to the carrier for cancellation and credit. For workers transported to a new area of employment, and where the original return portion of their tickets have been cancelled, one way tickets will be used for their return to the area of recruitment. Extensions of time limits on return tickets will be obtained where the period of employment is extended and such tickets are not to be cancelled. Where transportation facilities are chartered, contract procedure will be used.

H Transportation Assistants will be certain to make necessary arrangements for feeding the transported workers and their families while enroute. They will also provide medical care, and in the event of an emergency, other necessary services. Food may be provided in the form of "box-lunches" or by contract with caterers along the route. In the latter event prior arrangements must be made with the transportation company for a stop at a given point for sufficient time for the food to be served and eaten.

I Each Transportation Assistant will be designated as an Agent Cashier for the purpose of making necessary cash disbursements. He is also authorized to make open market purchases not to exceed $100 for any one purchase, and will be authorized to issue Government Transportation Requests for himself and recruited workers and their families. Vouchers (Standard Form No. 1034) and supporting receipts accounting for cash disbursed will upon completion of a trip be submitted to the Finance Area Office at Montgomery, Alabama, for audit and certification in accordance with standard procedure.


10

J When the recruited workers and their families have been assembled and the time of departure has been arranged and confirmed, the Transportation Assistant conducting the trip will, by telegraph or telephone, advise the Transportation Supervisor in the area of recruitment who in turn will inform the Chief of the Migratory Labor Camp Section, Washington, D. C., by telegraph, of the time of departure and time of expected arrival at destination, method of travel used, name of the original carrier and name of the delivering carrier, number of persons being transported, number of workers, and number of family groups. The Chief, Migratory Labor Camp Section, Washington, D. C., will notify the Transportation Supervisor in the area of employment.

K In any emergency while enroute, the Transportation Assistant will communicate by telegraph or telephone with the Chief of the Migratory Labor Camp Section, Washington, D. C., or his designee. The responsibility of the Transportation Assistant conducting the trip from the area of recruitment will cease when he arrives at the railhead or destination in the area of employment. At this point he will turn the group over to the assigned receiving Transportation Assistant and will deliver the memorandum cost records, unused portions of roundtrip tickets, and employment agreements (Form FSA-500) to the Transportation Assistant (Finance). The Transportation Assistant who accompanied the group will report to his Transportation Supervisor by wire for further instructions and will immediately write a brief narrative report of the trip and send the original to the Chief, Migratory Labor Camp Section, Washington, D. C., and a copy to his Transportation Supervisor.

L The Transportation Assistant assigned to receive the workers in the area of employment will make arrangements to transport them and their families from the railhead or destination to the place or places where they are to be housed and in the number of workers designated by the USES. It will be the responsibility of the Transportation Assistant to see that no more workers are housed at any point than housing has been approved for and that no workers are housed in facilities that have not been approved. The information as to approved housing will be in the possession of the USES order-holding office. Transportation will be arranged for in the same manner as specified for transportation in and from the area of recruitment.

M Upon completion of the employment periods if the workers and their families are not housed in an FSA camp, they must be immediately returned to the area of recruitment, unless they are immediately transported to another area of employment or the new employer arranges with the previous employer to continue to house them. Regardless of who provides the housing, workers will not be retained in an area of employment for an indefinite period of time in the hope that further work will be available.

N For workers to be returned to the area of recruitment, the Transportation Assistant (Finance) in the area of employment will prepare Form FSA-504, "Employment Termination Agreement", in an original and one copy for each such worker. The original and copy of Form FSA-504 will be given to the Transportation Assistant who will accompany the workers to the area of recruitment. Upon arrival in the area of recruitment the Transportation Assistant and the worker will both sign


11
both the original and one copy on Form FSA-504, the copy will be given to the worker and the original, with the original of Form FSA-500 will be forwarded through the Transportation Assistant (Finance), in the area of employment to the Communications and Records Section at Montgomery, Alabama, for filing.

O For those workers who are not moved to a new area of employment and who do not desire to be transported back to the area of recruitment, the Transportation Assistant (Finance) in the area of employment will prepare Form FSA-503, "Return Transportation Release", in an original and one copy. Both the Transportation Assistant (Finance) and the worker will sign both the original and copy of Form FSA-503, the copy will be given to the worker and the original will be forwarded with the Form FSA-500 to the Communications and Records Section at Montgomery, Alabama, for filing.

P When the workers and their families have been delivered to the place or places where they are to be housed, the Transportation Assistant (Finance) will be responsible for seeing that the cost report (Form FSA-210) is prepared and forwarded in accordance with FSA Instruction 368.5.

IX SUBSISTENCE:

(omitted as of September 8, 1942)

X EMPLOYMENT, TIME, AND EARNING RECORDS:

(omitted as of September 8, 1942)


11a

IX SUBSISTENCE:

A If after arrival at the place of housing, a worker is unable to provide subsistence for himself and his family prior to the time when he has worked and been paid, or during periods of unemployment due to weather conditions, or during periods of unemployment between employers' contracts, and so forth, he may be given emergency subsistence grants in the form of SMA food stamps, if it is possible to use stamps and if not, in cash. Combinations of stamps and cash may be used if stamps a re available but there is need for items other than food.

B Unless otherwise directed by the Chief of the Migratory Labor Section, Washington, D. C., if there is a grant office in the vicinity, the responsibility for determining the amount and kind of grant will rest with the Grant Officer. If there is no grant office but the workers are housed in an FSA camp, the Camp Manager will assume this responsibility.

C When either the Grant Officer or the Camp Manager makes the grant and food stamps are used or the grant is made by Government check, he will use the standard grant procedure. If the grant is in the form of currency, a Transportation Assistant who is an Agent Cashier will distribute the cash in the amount determined by the Grant Officer or Camp Manager.

D When neither a Grant Officer or Camp Manager is available or authorized, the Transportation Assistant will both determine the amount and kind of grant to be given and distribute the stamps or cash as the case may be.

E The amount of grant aid per person per day should be in accordance with the standards established for migratory workers (where they exist) or the standards used in the RR program.

F When workers and their families are housed in FSA Camps, the Camp Manager will be responsible for medical care and their general well being. When they are living in housing provided by the employer, the Transportation Assistant will be responsible.

G All grants as described above are "indirect" grants as defined in FSA Instruction 368.5 and may be made only against an approved Work Order for this purpose, estimated and requested by the Transportation Supervisor in the area of employment.


12

XI COMPLIANCE, ENFORCEMENT, AND LABOR RELATIONS:

A Wages and Wage Payments:

    A Wages and Wage Payments:
  • 1 The duplicate copy of the Time Report for Employees which has been audited by the Transportation Assistant (Finance) will be transmitted through the Transportation Supervisor in the area of employment for filing in the regional office and will be available for examination by the regional LR specialist at any time. Any violations of established wage rates (hourly or piece work) will be indicated on the form at the time of audit.
  • 2 Irrespective of whether an examination of the Time Report for Employees indicates any apparent violation of the agreement or not, periodic visits (not less than once every 10 days) will be made by the regional LR Specialist to the farm on which the transported workers are employed for the purpose of ascertaining the possible existence of violations not indicated by an examination of the Time Report.
  • 3 All violations shall be reported to the regional director who will make representations directly to the employer in an effort to eliminate and rectify the abuses. If the employer refuses to make restitution or correct the non-compliance, the use of the entire force of transported workers shall be declared available for employment on other farms and the names of the recalcitrant employers shall be transmitted by the regional director to all USES offices in the area for appropriate action by the USES. This may take the form of refusal to fill orders of such employers or, at least informing prospective employees of the unsatisfactory status of the employer.
  • 4 Workers who are charged with incompetence or who are accused of violating the terms of their employment agreements, shall be reported by the employer to the regional LR specialist or the regional director. The regional LR specialist shall make an investigation and report his findings and recommendations to the regional director. If violations are confirmed, the worker shall lose his right to return transportation.
  • 5 The necessity for additional wage payments to satisfy the guarantee of 75 per cent employment will be determined by an examination of the Time Reports for any one employee at the expiration of the cooperative employment agreement. The determination will be made by the Transportation Assistant (Finance) and may be checked by the regional LR specialist.

B Child Labor:

    B Child Labor:
  • 1 The regional LR specialist will check for compliance with the provisions of the contract with the employer with respect to child labor and with federal and state laws applicable thereto. Violations will be reported as described in paragraph XI A 3 above.
  • 2 In the event of continued violations of the child labor provisions, the employer's right to employ the family to which the minor is attached shall be cancelled and return transportation of the family at the expense of the FSA shall be forfeited.

C Housing, Sanitation, and Other Living Conditions:


    13
    C Housing, Sanitation, and Other Living Conditions:
  • The regional LR specialist shall on his periodical visits investigate the adequacy of the living conditions of the workers and their families and the compliance of the employer with the conditions of the housing inspection report. Improvements needed to meet the minimum standards shall be suggested to the employer and reported to the regional director. The regional director will formally notify the employer of the violation and required improvements, and will advise him that if the improvements are not made within a week the particular unit or units will be declared unfit for habitation and the affected workers will be made available for employment on other farms.

D Labor Relations, Mediation, and Other Methods of Enforcement:

    D Labor Relations, Mediation, and Other Methods of Enforcement:
  • 1 Workers shall have the right to elect their own representatives to deal with the employer, provided that such representatives are working members of the group, and to submit their complaints and grievances for adjustment directly to the employers or to the regional LR specialist. They shall further have the right to appeal to the FSA regional director.
  • 2 The regional LR specialist or any other representative of the FSA nominated by the regional director shall be authorized to deal with the employer on all questions affecting the working and living conditions of transported workers. In the event that grievances cannot be adjusted by the worker or his representative in direct negotiation with employers, or by the regional LR specialist or the regional director, the latter shall submit the dispute to a board of mediation. The board of mediation shall represent the workers, the employer, and the FSA. There shall be no stoppage of work and no lockout while mediation is in progress. If the employer refuses to mediate the dispute, or in the event mediation fails, the FSA member will forward his recommendations to the regional director for appropriate action as provided in paragraph XI A 3 above.

1

Exhibit A: Check Sheet for Inspection of Housing and Sanitary Facilities

figure


1

Exhibit B: Advice of Approval of Housing and Sanitary Facilities for Agricultural Workers

FSA Instruction 478.1 (Form FSA-506)
8-25-42

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
Advice of Approval of Housing and Sanitary
Facilities for Agricultural Workers
__________
(Date)
To: U. S. EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
Attention: __________
__________
(Address)

The housing and sanitary facilities of __________ inspected at __________ are approved for the residence of transported workers under the Farm Labor Transportation Program, provided that the total number of persons housed in these facilities does not exceed single persons, and separate family groups as shown on the reverse hereof, during the time transported workers are housed.

The "itemized notice" on the reverse shows the approved capacity for each separate room, cabin, or unit, stated in terms of (a) maximum size of the family which may be housed there, and (b) maximum number of single persons who may be housed there.

If this employer makes necessary arrangements with the USES in support of his order for transported workers, the Farm Security Administration under its Transportation Program will attempt to bring into the area for employment by him and residence in these facilities, a total of not more than __________ persons (workers and non-working members of their families).

These transported workers, and their family members, are to be housed in the facilities here certified, provided that during the period when they are so housed, the total number of all persons living in these facilities does not exceed the limits certified for each unit on the reverse hereof.

We wish to call attention to the fact that the FSA Farm Labor Transportation Program does not concern itself with the number of persons or families housed in these facilities, excepting during the periods when transported workers are in residence.

(The following does not apply if there is no FSA migratory labor camp in the area)

In addition to the above transported workers or families who may be housed in these facilities, this employer may house __________ persons, provided these additional persons are housed in the FSA camp at __________ and are supplied by him with necessary transportation daily between that camp and the site of their employment.

Sincerely yours,
(Signed)__________
Regional Director

__________
(Address)


2

FSA Instruction 478.1

The housing facilities of ____________________, at _______________________
are certified as residence for: __________________________________

                                   
Type and Designation, or Location, of Shelter  One family of not more than: OR  Single Persons to the number of not more than: 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 
(8) 
(9) 
(10) 
(11) 
(12) 
(13) 
(14) 
(15) 
(16) 

Single persons not to exceed ___ (or the equivalent in family groups, as below)

Or, not more than ___ separate family groups, of which ___ may include up to ___ members

And ____ may include up to ____ members

And ____ may include up to ____ members

And ____ may include up to ____ members

And ____ may include up to ____ members


1

RECRUITMENT AND TRANSPORTATION OF MEXICAN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS

FSA Instruction 478.2

I PURPOSE:

To make provision for an adequate supply and distribution of agricultural workers for the production and harvesting of agricultural crops essential to the war effort, the FSA and the United States Employment Service have undertaken a joint program to recruit and transport Mexican agricultural workers from Mexico and place them in areas of urgent labor shortage where it has not been possible to recruit domestic agricultural workers to supply such labor need.

II POLICIES:

A General. The agreement between the Mexican and United States Governments with respect to the importation into the United States of Mexican workers for agricultural work provides that:

    A General. The agreement between the Mexican and United States Governments with respect to the importation into the United States of Mexican workers for agricultural work provides that:
  • 1 Mexican workers shall not be subject to the Selective Service Act or to any military service;
  • 2 Mexican agricultural workers shall be entitled to freedom from discrimination in employment because of race, creed, color or national origin in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 8802 of the President of the United States, dated June 25, 1941;
  • 3 Mexican workers entering the United States shall enjoy the guarantees in Article 29 of the Mexican Labor Law, providing that contracts of employment must be in writing, that transportation and subsistence must be provided by the employer and that no deductions shall be made for such items from the wages agreed upon.

B Recruitment.

    B Recruitment.
  • 1 Mexican agricultural workers shall not be recruited for agricultural employment within the United States unless specific need for their employment has previously been certified to exist by the USES as provided in paragraph III B 4, and there shall be no recruiting of Mexican workers beyond the number certified by the USES to be needed.
  • 2 There will be no recruiting of less than 100 workers for any particular employer or group of employers or for any work period comprising less than 30 days.
  • 3 Mexican workers shall be recruited in Mexico by the FSA, with the cooperation and the assistance of the USES, and in accordance with such limitations as may be imposed by the Mexican Government pursuant to the agreement referred to in paragraph II A.
  • 4 Certification by the USES shall be based upon determinations that:
    • a A valid and bona fide application for workers has been made by responsible potential employers of agricultural workers;

    • [1 verso]
    • b The supply of domestic agricultural workers available in the particular area of employment or capable of recruitment from without such area by the USES under the program outlined in FSA Instruction 478.1 is inadequate to satisfy the need and that efforts to recruit such domestic workers have proven futile;
    • c Such potential employers have agreed to meet the standards of wages, working conditions, periods of employment, housing conditions and related requirements stipulated in the understanding between the Mexican and the United States Governments and contained, pursuant to the provisions hereinbelow set forth, in the agreements between the FSA and employers covering the employment of agricultural workers;
    • d Adequate housing, health and sanitary facilities, within the limitation of existing conditions, for the Mexican workers, are certified by the FSA to be available;
    • e Such potential employers have agreed and have indicated an ability to meet the obligations for transportation and other monetary guarantees required by the FSA;
    • f The crops, for the production or harvesting of which the Mexican workers are requested, are of importance to the war effort; and,
    • g The transportation of Mexican workers into the United States for agricultural employment will not lead to the displacement of domestic agricultural workers, to the impairment of opportunities for agricultural employment of domestic agricultural workers or the reduction or depression of wages for domestic agricultural workers.

C Transportation.

    C Transportation.
  • 1 Mexican workers and members of their families shall be transported from points of origin in Mexico to original points of destination within the United States and from such points of destination to intermediate points of destination and return to their points of origin in Mexico by facilities licensed to transport passengers.
  • 2 Costs of transportation of Mexican workers and members of their families from points of origin to points of destination within the United States and from such points of destination to intermediate points of destination and return to Mexico and all subsistence, medical and other necessary services and facilities while en route shall be paid for by the FSA.
  • 3 Personal belongings of Mexican workers and of members of their families to a maximum of 35 kilos (77 pounds) per person, shall be transported at the cost of the FSA.
  • 4 Costs of transportation of Mexican workers, and of members of their families, if the transportation thereof should be necessary, from original or intermediate points of destination within the United States to actual place of employment upon agricultural lands and return to such original or intermediate points of destination shall be paid for by the employers of the Mexican workers.

  • 2
  • 5 Employers will be required to pay to the FSA the sum of $5 per worker for each worker transported by the FSA irrespective of the distance such worker may be transported. No charge will be made for the transportation of any member of the worker's family who is not a worker.

D Wages and Conditions of Employment.

    D Wages and Conditions of Employment.
  • 1 Mexican workers shall be paid at not less than the prevailing wage rates within the particular area of employment, provided that in no event shall the wage rates paid be less than 30 cents per hour and provided, further, that piece work rates shall be so set as to enable a worker of average ability to earn not less than the prevailing hourly wage.
  • 2 The prevailing wage rates shall be those wage rates established for domestic workers by the Department of Agriculture pursuant to the procedure provided for in FSA Instruction 478.1.
  • 3 No deductions shall be made for commissions, fees or for any other charges (but not excluding such deductions as may be required by law) which shall have the effect, directly or indirectly, of reducing the wages received by Mexican workers below those provided for in paragraph II D 1 above.
  • 4 No minor shall be employed, except in compliance with and as permitted by Federal and State laws and policies, and in no event shall any minor under 14 years of age be employed. Nor shall any children under 16 years of age be transported except as members of families of Mexican worker.
  • 5 Housing, sanitary and medical facilities and services provided Mexican workers and members of their families shall meet reasonable minimum standards and such additional requirements as may be imposed by FSA.
  • 6 Mexican workers shall not be required to purchase articles or services for consumption or use by them or members of their families at any source not of their own choosing.
  • 7 Mexican workers shall enjoy the same rights and privileges, insofar as occupational diseases and accidents are concerned, as are afforded domestic agricultural workers under Federal and State statutes.
  • 8 Each group of Mexican workers shall elect their own representatives to deal with employers of agricultural labor provided that all such representatives shall be working members of the group.
  • 9 The FSA, in cooperation with appropriate Federal and State agencies, shall make all necessary provisions for insuring continuous compliance by employers of Mexican workers with wage provisions, working conditions, housing, sanitary and other living standards, transportation and all other provisions of employment contracts entered into by such employers and shall provide the necessary machinery for satisfying grievances and resolving disputes.
  • 10 The FSA will enter into agreements with Mexican workers transported under this program which will guarantee employment, or in the absence of employment, the making of a minimum subsistence payment of $3.00 per day, for 75 per cent of the work days (Sunday is not a work day) during the
    [2 verso]
    period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and a Mexican worker, provided that the amount of such subsistence payment, if any, as is required to be made under such agreement, shall be computed and the payment thereof shall be made at the end of the period of employment; and such agreements will provide, in addition, in the event of need, for the furnishing of subsistence and shelter during the periods of unemployment within the period of employment specified in the agreement between the FSA and a Mexican worker.
  • 11 For the purpose of determining compliance under the preceding paragraph, a work day shall contain not less than 8 hours nor more than 12 hours; provided, however, that to determine whether any minimum subsistence payments are to be made, the Government may, in its discretion, add hours of work less than eight done on any day except Sunday to hours of work less than eight done on any other day except Sunday, and for such purpose each 10 hours of work shall be counted as a work day.
  • 12 The agreement entered into by the FSA with Mexican workers and with employers of such Mexican workers, will contain such provisions as, in the opinion of the FSA, may be necessary to effectuate the objectives of the program.
  • 13 The workers are not employees of the United States Government, and are not entitled to the benefits of the United States Employees' Compensation Act of September 7, 1916, as amended.

III DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITIES AMONG GOVERNMENT AGENCIES:

A The FSA will be responsible for:

    A The FSA will be responsible for:
  • 1 Advising growers, farmers and other employers of agricultural workers, and all other interested persons of the program for the recruitment and transportation of Mexican agricultural workers;
  • 2 Determining the adequacy of housing facilities in areas of employment into which agricultural workers are to be transported;
  • 3 Approving (upon certification by USES) requests for the transportation of Mexican agricultural workers into areas of employment;
  • 4 Recruiting Mexican agricultural workers to fill approved applications at points recruitment designated by the Mexican Government, and arranging for their assembly at centers within Mexico;
  • 5 Entering into work agreements for specified periods of employment with recruited Mexican agricultural workers and into cooperative employment agreements with employers of recruited agricultural workers;
  • 6 Arranging for transportation of recruited agricultural workers, members of their families and personal belongings from points of origin or centers within Mexico to areas of employment within the United States and return to points of origin in Mexico, and providing for subsistence, medical care and other facilities and services while en route;

  • 3
  • 7 Providing migratory labor camps and other FSA housing facilities for recruited agricultural workers to the extent available;
  • 8 Providing subsistence and medical care to recruited agricultural workers during periods of unemployment when need therefor exists;
  • 9 Insuring compliance and enforcement of cooperative employment agreements, and providing machinery for satisfying grievances and resolving disputes;
  • 10 Guaranteeing employment or payments in lieu thereof for 75 per cent of the work days of periods of employment;
  • 11 Providing general supervision of the entire recruitment and transportation program.

B The United States Employment Service will be responsible for;

    B The United States Employment Service will be responsible for;
  • 1 Assisting the FSA in advising growers, farmers and other employers of agricultural workers, and all other interested persons of the program for the recruitment and transportation of Mexican agricultural workers;
  • 2 Receiving requests for agricultural workers from potential employers;
  • 3 Determining the availability of domestic agricultural workers in the area of employment;
  • 4 Certifying as to the need of transporting agricultural workers from areas of recruitment within the United States or from Mexico to alleviate agricultural labor shortages in a particular area of employment;
  • 5 Determining the willingness of potential employers making application for agricultural workers to meet and satisfy the requirements of the recruitment and transportation program;
  • 6 Certifying as to the unavailability of the required number of domestic agricultural workers in areas beyond the area of employment and the need of recruiting agricultural workers within Mexico;
  • 7 Receiving the recruited Mexican workers at the point of destination and assigning them to the employers.

C The Office of Defense Transportation will be responsible for:

    C The Office of Defense Transportation will be responsible for:
  • 1 Assisting the FSA in negotiating for rates for transportation of agricultural workers;
  • 2 Assisting the FSA in obtaining necessary facilities for transportation of recruited agricultural workers.

D State and County War Boards will be responsible for:

    D State and County War Boards will be responsible for:
    [3 verso]
  • 1 Assisting the FSA in advising growers, farmers and other employers of agricultural workers, and all other interested persons of the program for the recruitment and transportation of Mexican agricultural workers;
  • 2 Assisting the FSA in securing compliance with and enforcement of work and cooperative employment agreements entered into by the FSA with Mexican agricultural workers and employers.
  • 3 Designating the time and place within the area of employment for the holding of a public hearing of the wage board, when requested by the regional director, FSA and giving public notice thereof.

E The Immigration and Naturalization Service will be responsible for:

    E The Immigration and Naturalization Service will be responsible for:
  • 1 Interviewing and making a determination as to the admissibility of each Mexican worker tentatively recruited in Mexico by the FSA for admission to and employment as an agricultural laborer within the United States and of each member of such worker's family.
  • 2 Issuing to each male worker and male member of his family over 18 years of age, an identification card satisfying the requirements of the Selective Service Authorities.
  • 3 Taking such steps as may be required to comply with the alien registration requirements.
  • 4 Taking action in the event deportation of any Mexican worker or a member of his family becomes necessary.

F The Public Health Service will be responsible for:

    F The Public Health Service will be responsible for:
  • 1 Making such physical examination as may be required of each Mexican worker tentatively recruited in Mexico for admission and employment as an agricultural laborer within the United States and of the members of the families of such Mexican workers.
  • 2 Issuing and maintaining such records of physical examination as may be necessary.

IV FUNCTIONAL ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES WITHIN THE FSA:

A Management Functions.

    A Management Functions.
  • 1 The recruitment and transportation program will be conducted on a specialized assignment basis with the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration responsible for supervising, coordinating and rendering technical advice upon all phases of the program throughout the United States. All responsibility for recruitment and transportation of Mexican workers and members of their families will rest with the Coordinator and be performed by field staffs especially appointed for such purpose by him. Each regional office will, however, be responsible within its own region for certification as to the adequacy of housing, sanitary and health facilities, for the assembling of data with reference to prevailing wage rates and for the supervision of all relationships (other than auditing payrolls and wage payments), between employers and workers after their arrival at
    4
    points of destination and assignment to employers and until their departure from such original points of destination for transportation to intermediate points of destination or return to points of origin.
  • 2 For purposes of operation, areas will be designated as areas of employment and areas of recruitment (in Mexico). Field staffs, or more properly, transportation crews, will be assigned by the Coordinator as needed to these areas to perform necessary duties in connection with the program. In general, each transportation crew will consist of 1 Transportation Supervisor, 1 Transportation Assistant (Finance), and 1 or more other Transportation Assistants with such supplemental clerical assistance as may be required. All transportation crew personnel will be responsible to the Coordinator, will be moved from area to area at his direction and will keep such records and make such reports as may be required by him. One, probably the Transportation Assistant (Finance), or more members of a transportation crew in the area of employment will be assigned to remain with the group of recruited workers to check payrolls and wage payments, make collections, if any, from the employer, assist in processing vouchers, provide subsistence and subsistence payments in lieu of employment and make all necessary financial arrangements preliminary to assembly and transportation of the workers from the original point of destination within the area of employment to intermediate points of destination or return to point of origin in Mexico.

V ROUTINE:

The following is a summary statement of the chronological sequence of the steps to be taken from the certification by the regional representative of the USES of the need for recruiting Mexican workers to their return to the places of origin. While some of the steps may appear to be successive in point of time, it is anticipated that each agency will attempt to complete its portion of the work as rapidly as possible with the result that many of the steps may be taken simultaneously. It is further hoped that in some instances the taking of some of the steps will be unnecessary because of work previously done or information previously obtained.

  • A If it appears that a labor shortage exists in an area of employment and that such need cannot be met by recruiting and transporting domestic agricultural workers, the regional representative, USES, will certify to the Director, USES, Washington, D. C., the existence of a labor shortage, the inability to supply the need by the recruitment and transportation of domestic agricultural workers and the need for recruiting Mexican workers. The Director will further be advised as to the determinations concerning housing facilities and prevailing wages, the number of Mexican workers needed, the period of employment, the place of employment, the crops for which workers are requested and all other related data.
  • B The Director, USES, will notify the Administrator, FSA, for the attention of the Director, MA Division, of the certifications and determinations referred to. The Administrator will then determine whether to approve or disapprove the recruitment and transportation to the United States of the required number of Mexican workers. If the Administrator approves the proposed recruitment and transportation of Mexican workers, he will notify the Director, USES, and in turn the regional representative, the state director, and the order-holding office, USES, will be notified. The Administrator will also notify the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration and direct that cooperative employment agreements with the employer requesting the agricultural workers be entered into and that the other steps necessary to accomplish the recruitment and transportation of such workers be taken.
  • C The Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration will notify, by wire, the authorized representative of the Mexican Government (hereinafter referred to as the Mexican representative) of the desire to recruit and transport to the United States the required number of Mexican workers pursuant to
    [4 verso]
    the arrangement between the Mexican and United States Governments and request that the Mexican representative designate the areas of recruitment in Mexico and the number of workers which may be recruited in each area. The Coordinator will transmit copies of his communication to the Mexican representative to the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Public Health Service and the Office of Defense Transportation. At the same time, the Coordinator will also direct the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment to enter into cooperative employment agreements with the employer or employers for whom the Mexican workers are to be recruited.
  • D Upon receipt of a reply from the Mexican representative and upon advice that the cooperative agreements have been executed, the Coordinator will wire the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Public Health Service and the Transportation supervisor, FSA, in Mexico, of the area or areas of recruitment and the number of workers to be recruited in each area and request that representatives of such agencies immediately proceed to such areas for the purpose of recruiting the required workers. The Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment will tentatively recruit the required number of workers and arrange for their assembly for transportation. The Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Public Health Service will make such examinations of such workers as are tentatively recruited and of the members of their families as may be necessary to permit their admission to the United States. As each Mexican worker tentatively recruited is approved for admission to the United States by the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Public Health Service, a Transportation assistant will enter into a work agreement with each such worker.
  • E The Coordinator will notify the Office of Defense Transportation of the instructions to recruit and the Office of Defense Transportation will assist the Transportation supervisor in Mexico in making arrangements with a transportation company for transportation facilities to be available at points of assembly and arrangements for food and subsistence at such points and while enroute. The Transportation supervisor in Mexico will notify the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment of the departure of the recruited Mexican workers and the anticipated time of their arrival at the point of destination. A Transportation assistant or assistants will accompany the recruited Mexican workers to the point of destination.
  • F At the point of destination a representative of the USES and the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment will receive the recruited Mexican workers. The USES representative will assign such workers to the employer. The Transportation supervisor in the area of employment will see that the workers are provided with the housing, sanitation and health facilities previously determined to be available and will provide for necessary subsistence.
  • G The regional director will designate the regional LR specialist, a member of LR staff or of the regional Migratory Camp Section to supervise the work relations between the recruited agricultural workers and the employer. Such designee, together with a Transportation assistant (Finance) in the area of employment, who will check the employer's payroll records and wage payments and will ascertain whether there is compliance with the employment and living conditions of the agreements and the program. If during the period of employment disputes or conflicts arise between the employer and the workers or there is evidence of noncompliance on the part of either, the regional LR specialist will take the steps necessary to place the compliance, enforcement and mediation machinery into effect.

  • 5
  • H Prior to the end of the employment period, the regional director will notify the order-holding office, USES, of the impending termination of the employment period. The order-holding office, USES, will then communicate with other employment offices of the USES to determine whether requests for agricultural workers are on file and whether such requests can be filled either by recruiting domestic agricultural workers in the area of employment or in areas beyond the area of employment. If, following the procedure set forth in FSA Instruction 478.1 for the recruitment and transportation of domestic agricultural workers and the procedure hereinabove outlined, it is determined that such Mexican workers (or any of them) are needed to fill requests for agricultural employment, certifications to such effect will be made in accordance with the procedure therefor.
  • I The routine set forth will be followed in transferring workers from one area of employment to another area of employment except that it will be unnecessary to recruit such workers and to enter into work agreements and, if they are to be employed in the same or a nearby area of employment, it may not be necessary to arrange for their transportation. If it becomes necessary to transport such workers to a new area of employment, the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment and his assistants will perform the functions originally performed by the Transportation supervisor in Mexico and will assemble the workers and members of their families, make arrangements for transportation facilities and provide for subsistence while en route. He will also notify the Transportation supervisor in the new area of employment of the anticipated arrival of the workers at the new point of destination. Upon arrival the workers will be received by a representative of the USES and the Transportation supervisor who will assist in arranging for their assignment to the new employer and see that shelter and subsistence are available. The Immigration and Naturalization Service will be kept constantly advised by the Transportation supervisor of the movement of Mexican workers from the original point of destination to any intermediate point of destination.
  • J When it becomes necessary to return such Mexican workers to their place or origin within Mexico, the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment will assemble the workers and members of their families, make tentative arrangements for transportation facilities and for subsistence while en route to the points of origin in Mexico. He will also notify the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the contemplated return of such Mexican workers and of members of their families to Mexico and request that the Immigration and Naturalization Service approve and authorize the return to Mexico of the Mexican workers and members of their families. Upon receipt of such authorization the tentative arrangements for transportation facilities and for subsistence while en route will be completed and the Transportation supervisor in Mexico will be advised of the anticipated arrival of the Mexican workers at the point of origin. Upon arrival the workers will be received by the Transportation supervisor who will release them for return to their homes.

1

ROUTINE FOR THE RECRUITMENT AND TRANSPORTATION OF DOMESTIC AND MEXICAN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS

FSA Instruction 478.3

I GENERAL:

    I GENERAL:
  • A This Instruction provides the uniform detail procedure for carrying out the agricultural workers' transportation program as described in FSA Instruction 478.1, for domestic workers, and FSA Instruction 478.2 for Mexican workers.
  • B For convenience of reference, the text has been written generally for the recruitment and transportation of domestic workers. Except for provisions specifically limited to domestic or Mexican workers, the routine for Mexican workers will be identical, with the following substitutions:

               
Domestic Workers  Mexican Workers 
Chief, Migratory Camps Section, MA Division, Washington, D. C.  Supervisor of Mexican Migration. 
Director, MA Division, Washington, D. C.  Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration, San Francisco, California. 
Finance area manager, Montgomery, Alabama.  Finance area manager, Denver, Colorado. 
Communications and Records section, Montgomery, Alabama.  Communications and Records section, Denver, Colorado. 
Form FSA-500, "Work Agreement (Domestic Workers)".  Form FSA-501, "Work Agreement (Mexican Workers)". 
USES Placement Office.  FSA Mexican Recruiting Office. 

II DETERMINATION OF WAGES:

    II DETERMINATION OF WAGES:
  • A The Secretary shall appoint a wage board, composed of two representatives of the Department of Agriculture, one of the War Manpower Commission and one of the USES, instruct it to proceed to perform its duties in a designated area and to report its wage determinations and other findings to him.
  • B Upon the appointment of the wage board, the regional director, FSA, shall request the State USDA War Board to designate a place within the area of employment and a time for the holding of such hearings and to give public notice, not less than three days in advance of the hearing, to persons who may be interested. All notices will be given in the name of the Secretary acting by the Chairman of the State USDA War Board.
  • C Also immediately upon the receipt of notice of the probable need of transporting workers, the regional director shall direct the regional LR specialist to undertake an investigation of prevailing
    [1 verso]
    wage rates in the area of employment for the various farm operations for which labor is to be recruited. Such findings (including hourly rates, piece rates and workers' time performance if paid on a piece basis) shall be submitted to the wage board for its technical guidance.
  • D Representatives of employers of agricultural workers, of agricultural workers, of the public and other interested persons shall be given the opportunity of testifying at the wage board hearings.
  • E The wage board shall be in public session no longer than two days. It shall determine prevailing wages on the basis of the evidence developed at the public hearings or submitted to it by interested persons or groups. The wage board shall make findings and wage determinations of prevailing wage rates and submit such findings and determinations to the Secretary of Agriculture within one day following the termination of the hearing. The recommendations of the majority of the members of the board shall constitute the determination of the entire board. In the event there is no majority, the board shall submit the matter to the Secretary of Agriculture who shall make the final wage determinations.
  • F The prevailing wage rates as determined by the board, which in no event shall be less than 30 cents an hour, or its equivalent in piece work rates, shall constitute the minimum wage rates for the recruitment and transportation program. Such minimum rates shall be incorporated in the cooperative employment agreement between the FSA and employer as a condition for recruiting and transporting agricultural workers under the program.

III INSPECTION OF HOUSING AND SANITARY FACILITIES:

    III INSPECTION OF HOUSING AND SANITARY FACILITIES:
  • A All certifications as to housing and sanitary facilities must be made by the regional director within not more than six days after notice is received from the order-holding office, USES, that there is a local labor shortage and that an attempt will be made to recruit labor outside the area of employment.
  • B When instructed by the regional director, the regional LR specialist, with the assistance of the chief, regional Migratory Camps section and a regional representative of the Office of the Chief Engineer, will inspect the housing and sanitary facilities in the area of employment.
  • C The regional LR specialist, in making the inspection of the housing and sanitary facilities, will prepare Form FSA 505, "Check Sheet for Inspection of Housing and Sanitary Facilities", (copy attached as Exhibit A) in an original only, and will immediately submit it to the regional director, who will have all check sheets summarized and prepare Form FSA 506, "Advice of Approval of Housing and Sanitary Facilities for Agricultural Workers", (copy attached as Exhibit B) in an original and one copy. The original of Form FSA 506 will be forwarded to the order-holding office, USES, and the copy will be filed in the FSA regional office with the supporting check sheets, Form FSA 505.
  • D Instructions for using Form FSA 505, "Check Sheet for Inspection of Housing and Sanitary Facilities":
    • 1 GENERAL. The following material covers only those portions of the Form which do not appear to be self-explanatory. The Schedule Number will be assigned by the Inspector for his own record.

    • 2
    • 2 SECTION (2) HOUSING INSPECTED (A) LOCATION: State the location of the structures covered by the particular Form, in the form of simple directions which would enable a person to locate them quickly. For example:
    • "Southeastern end of Parker County, two miles south of the Yellow River Bridge, along highway 75, then east at sign marked `Wilson's Diary' 1/2 mile on gravel road to large red barn and windmill."
    • 3 SECTION (3) EMPLOYER INTENDS (A): These figures will be inclusive of any local labor other than furnished under the transportation program.
    • 4 SECTION (4) SPECIFIC HOUSING (A): The inspector will determine whether there are any state or county laws or regulations applicable to rural housing or sanitation in the area of employment. If there are, he will familiarize himself with them. If upon inspecting the property it seems that violations of such laws or regulations exist, the inspector will determine whether the appropriate local governmental agency has made an inspection recently, and whether the property was approved or not. Without attempting to make a determination for the local governmental agency, the inspector will then form and report his own opinion as to whether the property appears to meet such laws and regulations. If the answer is "no", the inspection will be concluded, with appropriate explanation.
    • 5 SECTION (4) SPECIFIC HOUSING (B): All groupings of housing at any site will be placed on the same form up to the limit of 10-room and/or cabin units. Separate groupings will be placed on separate forms. In the blocks in this section a check mark or "no" will be used to indicate that the conditions are or are not satisfactory.
    • 6 SECTION (4) SPECIFIC HOUSING (D): The standard to be used in checking the size of room units will be at least 168 square feet of floor area, with a minimum dimension (length or width) of 12 feet, for each family of four or less members, or each group of three or less single workers. Forty square feet will be added for each additional member of a family, and sixty square feet for single persons. The minimum ceiling height in all cases will be eight feet.
    • 7 SECTION (4) SPECIFIC HOUSING (E): This is the final determination and will not be made at the time of inspection.
  • E Instruction for using Form FSA 506, "Advice of Approval of Housing and Sanitary Facilities for Agricultural Workers".
    • 1 Before FSA camp facilities are offered for housing agricultural workers and their families, the regional LR specialist will make arrangements with the chief, regional Migratory Camps section to provide and reserve the facilities offered on Form FSA 506.
    • 2 The description of the type, designation or location of housing units should be sufficiently specific to adequately identify the unit at the site.
  • F Form FSA 505 and Form FSA 506 are authorized for regional reproduction if and when the transportation program becomes active in the particular region.

[2 verso]

IV EMPLOYERS AGREEMENT AND PERFORMANCE BOND:

    IV EMPLOYERS AGREEMENT AND PERFORMANCE BOND:
  • A When the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment has been directed by the Director, MA Division, to enter into a cooperative employment agreement with the employer, the Transportation supervisor will prepare Form FSA-502, "Cooperative Employment Agreement", in an original and one copy, both of which will be executed by both the employer and the Transportation supervisor (on behalf of the Government). The copy will be given to the employer and the original will be retained (for the duration of the employment period) by the Transportation assistant (Finance). At this time the Transportation assistant (Finance) will collect the advance payment required of the employer under the agreement, and execute a receipt therefor in duplicate (original to employer and copy retained). Any additional transportation charge due from the employer will be collected upon arrival of the workers in the area of employment.
  • B At the time the "Cooperative Employment Agreement" is entered into, the employer will at the discretion of the Director, MA Division, Washington, D.C. be required to furnish a "Performance and Payment Bond", Form FSA 509. Bonds will be obtained, if practicable, from surety companies licensed to do business in the state and listed as holding certificates of authority from the U. S. Treasury Department as acceptable sureties on Federal bonds. If no such approved company is represented in the same town or city as the employer and it is inexpedient to deal with an approved company in another town or city, acceptance of a bond from a financially responsible surety company which is licensed to do business in the state but which is not on the Treasury Department approved list may be authorized by the regional director. One executed copy of the bond will be attached to the original of the employment agreement.
  • C The amount of the bond will be equal to the estimated amount due the workers and the Government under the employment agreement as determined by the regional director. If no bond is required the applicable paragraph will be crossed out of Form FSA-502 and the deletion initialed by both the employer and the Transportation supervisor.
  • D Upon completion of the employment period, the Transportation assistant (Finance) will forward the originals of Form FSA-502 and Form FSA-509 to the Transportation supervisor in the area for forwarding to the regional Communications and Records section at Montgomery, Alabama, for filing.

V RECRUITMENT AND TRANSPORTATION:

    V RECRUITMENT AND TRANSPORTATION:
  • A A Transportation supervisor and one or more Transportation assistants will be assigned to the area of recruitment and a similar crew and a Transportation assistant (Finance) to the area of employment. The Transportation supervisors will be administratively responsible to the Chief of the Migratory Camps section, MA Division, Washington, D. C., and responsible for all phases of the program within their assigned areas. The Transportation assistant (Finance) will be technically responsible to the Finance area manager at Montgomery, Alabama.
  • B When the Director, USES, Washington, D. C., notifies the Administrator of the certification of need for transported agricultural workers, the contract with the employer has been signed, and the area or areas of recruitment have been defined and the approximate number of persons to be recruited in each area is known, Form FSA 206, "Work Order," and Form FSA 207, "Job Order", will be issued by the Director of the MA Division, Washington, D. C., in accordance with FSA Instruction 368.5 and transmitted to the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment. Telegraphic advice of the issuance of the Work and Job Orders will be sent to the Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment.

  • 3
  • C When the telegraphic advice of the Work and Job Orders is received by the Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment, he will assign one or more Transportation assistants to receive, as they are recruited by the USES, transport, and provide subsistence for the workers and their families up to the time they are delivered to the Transportation assistant at the area of employment. When the Work and Job Orders are received by the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment, he will assign one Transportation assistant (Finance) and one or more other Transportation assistants to arrange for the receipt of transported workers and transportation to their housing facilities in the area of employment, and will give the Work and Job Orders to the Transportation assistant (Finance) who will be responsible for accumulating the cost information. Transportation assistants in the area of recruitment will tabulate on the reverse of a Job Order form (memorandum copy) all expenses incurred in transporting and providing subsistence for workers and their families up to the time they are delivered to the point of assembly for through transportation, and will turn this cost data over to the Transportation assistant who is assigned to accompany the group while in transit by through carrier to the area of employment. The Transportation assistant who accompanies the group to the area of employment will deliver any accumulated cost data to the Transportation assistant (Finance) at the area of employment.
  • D The Transportation assistants in the area of recruitment will execute on behalf of the Government agreements with recruited workers on Form FSA-500, "Employment Agreement (Domestic Workers)". Form FSA-500 will be executed in an original and one copy, both of which will be signed by both the worker and the Transportation assistant. A separate contract will be executed with each individual member of a family who is transported as a worker regardless of whether the worker is an adult or a minor. In the case of a worker who is a minor, the written approval of the contract by the natural or legal guardian of the minor should be obtained if possible. Only the non-working members of a family will be listed in Schedule A on the back of the Work Agreement (Form FSA-500), executed by the head of a family. The copy will be given to the worker and the original will be retained by the Transportation Assistant for forwarding with the worker to the Transportation Assistant (Finance) in the area of employment. Upon completion of the period of employment or termination prior thereto, the original of Form FSA-500 will be forwarded to the regional Communications and Records section at Montgomery, Alabama for permanent filing.
  • E - Workers will be expected to assemble at USES Placement Offices or at places designated by the USES at their own expense. They may be transported directly to the area of employment from these locations or assembled at other points for through transportation. The Transportation assistant will be expected to provide the most economical transportation and in general through transportation should be arranged for in units of one car load or bus load. Rail transportation will be by second class (coach) accommodations.
  • F Transportation assistants should make arrangements for transportation with local railroad and bus officials. If difficulties are experienced the matter will be immediately reported by telegraph or telephone to the Chief, Migratory Camps section, Washington, D. C., who will enlist the assistance of the Office of Defense Transportation.
  • G In the interest of economy, although the workers may not be returned to the area of recruitment from the first area of employment, ROUND TRIP tickets for transportation of workers must be purchased wherever they are available. Round trip fares are scaled according to the length of time for which the tickets are valid. Therefore the duration of the round trip tickets purchased should be not longer than the period of the contract plus the necessary allowance for actual transportation time, delay prior to actual start of employment, and so forth. Round trip tickets generally are issued for
    [3 verso]
    30, 60, 90, and 180 day periods. The Transportation assistant who accompanies the group to the area of employment will issue one Standard Form No. 1030, "Government Request for Transportation" for himself and the group of workers, and will deliver the unused portion of such tickets to the Transportation assistant (Finance) in the area of employment except for the return portion of one round-trip ticket for himself. He will obtain a receipt for the tickets turned over. The Transportation assistant (Finance) will hold them pending return of the workers to the area of recruitment or transportation to another area of employment. In the event the return transportation is not used prior to the expiration of the time limit, the local representative of the carrier should be requested to extend the time limit and Government Requests for Transportation should be issued to cover the changes involved. If the workers are to be transported from the first area of employment to a second area of employment application should be made to the local representative of the carrier to convert the unused portion of the round-trip ticket for a diversified routing back to the area of recruitment via the second area of employment. If additional cost is involved in this diversified routing, Government Request for Transportation should be issued to cover the additional charges. If it is not possible to convert the unused portion of the round-trip ticket, one-way transportation to the second area of employment should be obtained and the unused portion of the round-trip ticket returned to the Finance area manager for cancelation. Unused portions of round-trip tickets for workers who do not desire to return to the area of recruitment should be returned to the Finance area office, Montgomery, Alabama for cancelation. Where other than common carrier facilities are chartered, purchase order procedure will be used, if possible or paid for in cash.
  • H In all situations, the Transportation assistant is responsible for securing the cheapest transportation, taking into consideration diversified routing of round-trip tickets, special charter or party rates and other individual concessions made by various carriers (as in the case of sugar beet workers). Such information should be developed by consultation with local representatives of the carrier and whenever possible, a signed statement of their recommendations should be obtained.
  • I Transportation assistants will be certain to make necessary arrangements for feeding the transported workers and their families while enroute. They will also provide medical care, and in the event of an emergency other necessary services. Food may be provided in the form of "box-lunches" or by contract with caterers along the route. In the latter event prior arrangements must be made with the transportation company for a stop at a given point for sufficient time for the food to be served and eaten. Subsistence and other services provided enroute will be secured by Form FSA-BM 20 "Purchase Order". If the Purchase Order is not acceptable to the vendor, the items may be obtained by cash payments. Medical services and supplies should be paid for in cash.
  • J Each Transportation assistant will be designated as an agent-cashier for the purpose of making necessary cash disbursements. He is also authorized to make open market purchases not to exceed $300 for any one purchase, and will be authorized to issue Government Transportation Requests for himself and recruited workers and their families. Even though formal competition is not required, the Transportation supervisors and the Transportation assistants should in every instance where time permits make a price survey of all available local sources of supply in order to determine the most advantageous offer for the Government. Vouchers and supporting receipts accounting for cash disbursed will upon completion of a trip be submitted to the Finance area office at Montgomery, Alabama, for audit and certification in accordance with FSA Instruction 320.1.

  • 4
  • K When the Purchase Order has been written the copies should be distributed as follows:
    • 1 The original to the vendor.
    • 2 Two pink copies marked "Accounts Office Copy" to the Finance area manager, Montgomery, Alabama.
    • 3 The copies marked as follows should be retained for files of the official issuing the Purchase Order:
      • "Purchasing Officer's Copy"
      • "To be retained by Consignee"
      • Canary Copy marked "Copy for _____"
      • Green Copy marked "Copy for _____"
    • 4 The copy marked "Invoice Copy—Return to Purchasing Officer" should be signed and dated by the consignee in the block provided for acknowledgment of receipt of the goods purchased and forwarded to the Finance area manager, Montgomery, Alabama.
    • 5 The blue copy marked "Property Records Copy" should be forwarded to the MA Division, Migratory Camps section, Washington, D. C.
  • L The distribution of the copies of the Purchase Order as outlined above should not be accomplished until such time as the assignment under any given Work Order has been completed. At the time the Purchase Order is released to the vendor and the goods are delivered, a vendor's certificate commercial invoice in an original and two copies should be obtained in order that there may be no delay in payment. Each vendor is required to place the certification on his invoice as follows:
  • "I certify that the above bill is correct and just; that payment therefor has not been received; that all statutory requirements as to American production and labor standards and all conditions of purchase applicable to the transactions have been complied with, and that State or local taxes are not included in the amounts billed."
  • This invoice then should be attached to the salmon copy of the Purchase Order on which acknowledgment of receipt of goods is made by the consignee. When the Transportation assistant receives his Letter of Authorization there will be contained in that Letter of Authorization a series of numbers which are to be used to number each of the Purchase Orders he issues.
  • M When the recruited workers and their families have been assembled and the time of departure has been arranged and confirmed, the Transportation assistant conducting the trip will, by telegraph or telephone, advise the Transportation supervisor in the area of recruitment who in turn will inform the Chief of the Migratory Camps section, Washington, D. C., by telegraph, of the time of departure and time of expected arrival at destination, method of travel used, name of the original carrier and name of the delivering carrier, number of persons being transported, number of workers, and number of family groups. The Chief, Migratory Camps section, Washington, D.C. will notify the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment.

  • [4 verso]
  • N In any emergency while enroute, the Transportation assistant will communicate by telegraph or telephone with the Chief of the Migratory Camps section, Washington, D. C., or his designee. The responsibility of the Transportation assistant conducting the trip from the area of recruitment will cease when he arrives at the railhead or destination in the area of employment. At this point he will turn the group over to the assigned receiving Transportation assistant and will deliver the memorandum cost records, unused portions of round-trip tickets, and employment agreements (Form FSA-500) to the Transportation assistant (Finance). The Transportation assistant who accompanied the group will report to his Transportation supervisor by wire for further instructions and will immediately write a brief narrative report of the trip and send the original to the Chief, Migratory Camps section, Washington, D. C. and a copy to his Transportation supervisor.
  • O The Transportation assistant assigned to receive the workers in the area of employment will make arrangements to transport them and their families to the point of destination specified in the Cooperative Employment Agreement, Form FSA-502 (if this point of destination is not the same as the railroad station, bus depot, or other point where he receives them) and in the number of workers designated by the USES. It will be the responsibility of the Transportation assistant to see that no more workers are housed at any point than housing has been approved for and that no workers are housed in facilities that have not been approved. The information as to approved housing will be in the possession of the USES order-holding office. Transportation will be arranged for in the same manner as specified for transportation in and from the area of recruitment.
  • P Upon completion of the employment periods if the workers and their families are not housed in an FSA camp, they must be immediately returned to the area of recruitment, unless they are immediately transported to another area of employment or the new employer arranges with the previous employer to continue to house them. Regardless of who provides the housing, workers will not be retained in an area of employment for an indefinite period of time in the hope that further work will be available.
  • Q For workers to be returned to the area of recruitment prior to the termination of the employment agreement, (Form FSA 500), the Transportation assistant (Finance) in the area of employment will prepare Form FSA-504, "Employment Termination Agreement", in an original and one copy for each such worker. The Transportation assistant (Finance) and the worker will both sign both the original and one copy of Form FSA-504, the copy will be given to the worker and the original, with the original of Form FSA-500 will be forwarded to the regional Communications and Records section at Montgomery, Alabama, for filing.
  • R For those domestic workers who are not moved to a new area of employment and who do not desire to be transported back to the area of recruitment, the Transportation assistant (Finance) in the area of employment will prepare Form FSA-503, "Return Transportation Release", in an original and one copy. Both the Transportation assistant (Finance) and the worker will sign both the original and copy of Form FSA-503, the copy will be given to the worker and the original will be forwarded with the Form FSA-500 to the regional Communications and Records section at Montgomery, Alabama, for filing.
  • S When the workers and their families have been delivered to the place or places where they are to be housed, the Transportation assistant (Finance) will be responsible for seeing that the "Field Cost Report", Form FSA-210 is prepared and forwarded in accordance with FSA Instruction 368.5.

5

VI SUBSISTENCE:

    VI SUBSISTENCE:
  • A If after arrival at the place of housing, a worker is unable to provide subsistence for himself and his family prior to the time when he has worked and been paid, or during periods of unemployment between employers' contracts, or during periods of unemployment due to weather conditions, and so forth, he may be given emergency subsistence grants in the form of SMA (Surplus Marketing Administration) food stamps, if it is possible to use stamps and if not, by check or in cash. Combinations of stamps and cash may be used if stamps are available but there is need for items other than food.
  • B Unless otherwise directed by the Chief of the Migratory Camp section, Washington, D. C., if there is a grant office in the vicinity, the responsibility for determining the amount and kind of grant will rest with the grant officer. If there is no grant office but the workers are housed in an FSA camp, the camp manager will assume this responsibility.
  • C When either the grant officer or the camp manager makes the grant and food stamps are used or the grant is made by Government check, he will use the standard grant is in the form of currency, a Transportation assistant who is an agent-cashier will distribute the cash in the amount determined by the grant officer or camp manager. Grants will be made in cash only where SMA food stamps are not available and checks could not be received in time to meet an immediate need.
  • D When neither a grant officer or camp manager is available or authorized, the Transportation assistant will both determine the amount and kind of grant to be given and distribute the stamps or cash as the case may be.
  • E The amount of grant aid per person per day should be in accordance with the standards established for migratory workers (where they exist) or the standards used in the RR program.
  • F When workers and their families are housed in FSA camps, the camp manager will be responsible for medical care and their general well being. When they are living in housing provided by the employer, the Transportation assistant will be responsible.
  • G All grants as described above are "indirect" grants as defined in FSA Instruction 368.5 and may be made only against an approved Work Order for this purpose, estimated and requested by the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment.
  • H Transported workers will not be required to execute Work Agreements with the FSA in recognition of subsistence grants while they are under this program.

VII EMPLOYMENT, TIME, AND EARNINGS RECORDS:

    VII EMPLOYMENT, TIME, AND EARNINGS RECORDS:
  • A The Transportation assistant (Finance) in the area of employment will provide the employer with a supply of Form FSA-507, "Work Ticket", and Form FSA-508, "Time and Earning Report", which the employer will be required to use in receipting for time and work, and scheduling the weekly earnings of transported workers.

  • [5 verso]
  • B Daily, the employer or his foreman will give each worker a receipt for his time and work. Form FSA-507 will be executed in an original and one copy. The original will be given to the worker and the copy will be retained by the employer for posting to Form FSA-508. To provide a record of days on which the employer had work for a worker, which he was unable to accept because of illness, Form FSA-507 may be prepared by the employer in the usual way except that in the space provided for hours worked, and so forth, there will be inserted a statement that the worker was sick and unable to work on this day or for so many hours of the day as he could not accept work. The worker will be asked to sign Form FSA-507 under this statement.
  • C Any advances made by the employer against the worker's earnings will be evidenced by a receipt signed by the worker and posted to Form FSA-508.
  • D Weekly, the employer will prepare Form FSA-508 to cover the earnings of all transported workers assigned to him. Form FSA-508 will be prepared in an original and one copy and will be supported by copies of Form FSA-507, Work Tickets, and receipts for advances. Any other deductions will be explained by footnotes describing the nature and basis thereof.
  • E As each worker is paid he will be required to sign Form FSA-508 beside the itemized statement of his earnings as evidence of his receipt of the net payment shown thereon. After payment and signing of Form FSA-508 by the workers, the Transportation assistant (Finance) will examine the original of Form FSA-508 for signatures and possible remarks noted thereon by the workers. The Transportation assistant (Finance) will receive from the employer the copy of Form FSA-508, attach any memoranda or comments, and forward it to the regional director.
  • F The twenty per cent deduction from earnings of Mexican workers will be collected by the Transportation assistant (Finance) in a lump sum for each week, and will be scheduled and deposited in accordance with paragraph IX, herein.
  • G For corrections of errors in payments (either over or under payments), a supplemental time and earnings report will be used for each week in which an error in payment occurred, and such supplemental report will list only the worker whose payment was in error, and the net adjustment (in the appropriate column for the day of the week to which the adjustment applies). Overpayments will be shown as deductions on the next weekly time and earnings report, with a footnote reference thereon, to the supplemental report. For underpayments, net cash payments, and, for Mexican workers, payment of twenty per cent deductions, will be made as in the case of a regular weekly payment.
  • H At the end of the employment period, the Transportation assistant (Finance) will review the originals of Form FSA-508 for the period to determine the extent of liability of the employer for periods of unemployment under the wage guarantee in the agreements with the employer and transported workers, and will discuss such computations with the employer, who will be expected to make the additional payments at that time.
  • I If the employer cannot or will not make the additional payments directly to the workers, the Transportation assistant (Finance) will notify the regional director through the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment, forwarding the details of his computations, and will request the
    6
    regional director to prepare Form FSA-FI 58 to cover the payments as direct grants. The voucher will be prepared to list the workers individually and will request the Disbursing officer to mail the checks in care of the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment or area of recruitment, whichever is appropriate, for delivery to the workers.
  • J The regional director will forward the letter from the Transportation assistant (Finance), the "Public Voucher for Direct Relief, Stricken Agricultural Areas", Form FSA-FI 58, and the copies of Form FSA-508 for the employment period concerned to the Chief, Migratory Camps section, MA Division, Washington, D. C.
  • K The Chief, Migratory Camps section, Washington, D. C., will review the file and sign Form FSA-FI-58, recommending payment as listed thereon, will forward the Form FSA-FI 58 to the Finance area manager at Montgomery, Alabama, with the supporting Forms FSA-508 for the employment period, for certification and payment.
  • L The Chief, Migratory Camps section, Washington, D. C., will prepare, for signature by the Director, MA Division, a letter to the employer advising that the grant checks are being drawn, and demanding payment by the employer to the government of an amount equal to the total of such grants which are chargeable to him under his agreement. This letter will direct that the employer's check be sent to the Finance area manager at Montgomery, Alabama. This letter will be supported by a schedule of the computations of the amounts due each worker to whom a grant is being made.
  • M Upon signature of the letter to the employer by the Director, MA Division, a copy will be sent to the Finance area manager at Montgomery, Alabama. Subsequent follow-up of the account will be made by the Finance area manager, with a copy of such follow-up letter being provided for the Director, MA Division.
  • N For employer's accounts not settled at the end of thirty days the Finance area manager at Montgomery, Alabama, will advise the Director, MA Division, who will consult the office of the Solicitor regarding further proceedings for enforcement of the collection. The Finance area manager at Montgomery, Alabama, will, at this time, forward to the Director, MA Division, the copies of Form FSA-508 for the period concerned, and other pertinent papers.

VIII COMPLIANCE, ENFORCEMENT, AND LABOR RELATIONS:

    VIII COMPLIANCE, ENFORCEMENT, AND LABOR RELATIONS:
  • A Wages and Wage Payments.
    • 1 The duplicate copy of the Time Report for Employees which has been audited by the Transportation assistant (Finance) will be transmitted through the Transportation supervisor in the area of employment for filing in the regional office and will be available for examination by the regional LR specialist at any time. Any violations of established wage rates (hourly or piece work) will be indicated on the form at the time of audit.

    • [6 verso]
    • 2 Irrespective of whether an examination of the Time Report for Employees indicates any apparent violation of the agreement or not, periodic visits (not less than one every 10 days) will be made by the regional LR specialist to the farm on which the transported workers are employed for the purpose of ascertaining the possible existence of violations not indicated by an examination of the Time Report.
    • 3 All violations shall be reported by the regional LR specialist to the regional director who will make representations directly to the employer in an effort to eliminate and rectify the abuses. If the employer refuses to make restitution or correct the non-compliance, the use of the entire force of transported workers shall be declared available for employment on other farms and the names of the recalcitrant employers shall be transmitted by the regional director to all USES offices in the area for appropriate action by the USES. This may take the form of refusal to fill orders of such employers, or, at least informing prospective employees of the unsatisfactory status of the employer.
    • 4 Workers who are charged with incompetence or who are accused of violating the terms of their employment agreements, shall be reported by the employer to the regional LR specialist or the regional director. The regional LR specialist shall make an investigation and report his findings and recommendations to the regional director. If violations are confirmed, in the case of domestic workers the worker shall lose his right to return transportation, and in the case of Mexican workers the worker shall immediately be returned to the area of recruitment in Mexico.
    • 5 The necessity for additional wage payments to satisfy the guarantee of 75 per cent employment will be determined by an examination of the Time Reports for any one employee at the expiration of the cooperative employment agreement. The determination will be made by the Transportation assistant (Finance) and may be checked by the regional LR specialist.
  • B Child Labor.
    • 1 The regional LR specialist will check for compliance with the provisions of the contract with the employer with respect to child labor and with federal and state laws applicable thereto. Violations will be reported as described in paragraph VIII A 3 above.
    • 2 In the event of continued violations of the child labor provisions, the employer's right to employ the family to which the minor is attached shall be canceled. In the case of domestic workers, return transportation of the family at the expense of the FSA shall be forfeited, and in the case of Mexican workers the family shall be immediately returned to the area of recruitment in Mexico.
  • C Housing, Sanitation, and Other Living Conditions. The regional LR specialist shall on his periodical visits, investigate the adequacy of the living conditions of the workers and their families and the compliance of the employer with the conditions of the housing inspection report. Improvements needed to meet the minimum standards shall be suggested to the employer and reported to the regional director. The regional director will formally notify the employer of the violation and required improvements, and will advise him that if the improvements are not made within a week, the particular unit or units will be declared unfit for habitation and the affected workers will be made available for employment on other farms.

  • 7
  • D Labor Relations, Mediation, and Other Methods of Enforcement.
    • 1 Workers shall have the right to elect their own representative to deal with the employer, provided that in the case of Mexican workers such representatives are working members of the group, and to submit their complaints and grievances for adjustment directly to the employers or to the regional LR specialist. They shall further have the right to appeal to the FSA regional director.
    • 2 The regional LR specialist or any other representative of the FSA nominated by the regional director shall be authorized to deal with the employer on all questions affecting the working and living conditions of transported workers. In the event that grievances cannot be adjusted by the worker or his representative in direct negotiation with employers, or by the regional LR specialist or the regional director, the latter shall submit the dispute to a board of mediation. The board of mediation shall represent the workers, the employer, and the FSA. There shall be no stoppage of work and no lockout while mediation is in progress. If the employer refuses to mediate the dispute, or in the event mediation fails, the FSA member will forward his recommendations to the regional director for appropriate action as provided in paragraph VIII A 3 above.

IX CASH COLLECTIONS AND REFUNDS:

    IX CASH COLLECTIONS AND REFUNDS:
  • A General. The agent-cashiers Bond Treasury Form No. 1671 E, revised, covers only disbursing activities. Under no circumstance will an agent-cashier ever make collections of any kind unless directed to do so (other than the collection of a disallowed amount). If it is determined that he is to make collections, it will be necessary that he file an additional bond with the FSA. This type of bond will be supplied by the Director of the MA Division for domestic labor or by the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration and the regular bonding procedure for collecting officials will apply.
  • B Receipts. All collections will be acknowledged by a receipt prepared by the collecting official in an original and one copy. No special form will be required for this purpose. Receipts may be either typed or purchased locally, and must adequately describe the form of remittance, (cash, check, or money order), purpose thereof, and for other than cash, the name of the maker thereof and serial number if any. The original of the receipt will be given to the remitter, and the copy will be attached to the copy of "Schedule of Collections", Standard Form No. 1044 to be forwarded to the Finance area office.
  • C Scheduling Collections.
    • 1 All collections taken in during any one day will be included on Standard Form No. 1044 prepared in an original and six copies as follows:
      • a Schedule No. - A serial number starting at 1 for each Transportation supervisor.
      • b Sheet No. "1" of "1".
      • c Department of Establishment - U. S. Department of Agriculture
      • d Bureau or Office - Farm Security Administration

      • [7 verso]
      • e Received by - G. F. Allen, Chief Disbursing Officer, at Atlanta, Georgia for domestic labor, and at Denver, Colorado for Mexican Labor.
      • f Period - Leave this space blank.
      • g D. O. Symbol No. - This number will be furnished by contacting the Finance area manager at Montgomery, Alabama for domestic labor, and the Finance area manager at Denver, Colorado for Mexican labor.
      • h Date Received. Accounting day for which the Schedule is being prepared.
      • i Receipt Number. Start with number 1 for each Transportation supervisor.
      • j Name of Remitter and Detail Description of Purpose for which collections were received - "Collections for 200 mile guarantee at $5.00 per worker" or "20% deductions from earnings of Mexican agricultural workers as per attached list in detail".
      • k Amount - The total of all collection receipts issued during the accounting day.
      • l Funds to be Credited - Special Deposits - The proper number will be obtained from the Area finance office at Denver, Colorado for Mexican labor, and at Montgomery, Alabama for domestic labor.
      • m Total - The total of the Amount Column.
      • n Forwarded - The date on which the Schedule is transmitted to the Disbursing officer.
      • o By - Name of collecting official.
      • p Title - Title of collecting official.
      • q All other items will be left blank.
    • 2 Distribution of Schedule Copies. The original and six copies of the schedule of collections will be distributed as follows:
      • a Original and three copies to the Disbursing officer. To these copies will be attached the money order or checks. Two copies will be returned by the Disbursing officer to the Finance area manager who will mail one copy to the collecting official as a receipt.
      • b One copy with copies of supporting receipts to the Finance area manager.
      • c One copy to the Finance area manager for transmittal to the regional Communications and Records section.
      • d One copy to be held by the collecting official.

  • 8
  • D Depositing Collections with Disbursing Officers.
    • 1 The collecting official will transmit all of one day's collections with the proper number of schedules of collections as provided in paragraph IX C above, directly to the appropriate U. S. Treasury Disbursing office by first class mail. Personal checks, certified checks, bank drafts and money orders will be transmitted as received and the collecting official will convert any cash received into postal money orders payable to the Treasurer of the United States.
    • 2 The collecting official will make himself known to the local postmaster by means of his identification card, and will prepare an application or applications for sufficient number of postal money orders of one hundred dollars ($100) each and/or one money order of less than one hundred dollars, ($100) to balance to the total of cash presented, payable to the Treasurer of the United States and drawn on the postmaster of the city in which the U. S. Treasury Disbursing officer is located.
      • a Fees covering the purchase of postal money orders will be paid by means of Standard Form No. 1034, "Public Voucher for Purchases other than Personal". One copy of Standard Form, No. 1034 and three yellow copies of Standard Form No. 1034a will be prepared, by the collection official. Receipt stubs for postal money orders purchased must be attached to the original of the voucher given to the postmaster, together with two yellow copies of Standard Form No. 1034a. A notation will be made on the face of the postal money order application reading, "Fees paid by Standard Form No. 1034". If required by the postmaster, one additional copy of Standard Form No. 1034a will be made for his files.
      • b The postmaster, at the close of business on the last day of each month will transmit the original and two yellow copies of the Voucher or Vouchers with the receipt stubs attached, in an envelope addressed to the Finance area manager in Montgomery, Alabama for domestic labor and to Denver, Colorado for the Mexican labor.
      • c Where possible, checks will be drawn payable to the Treasurer of the United States; such checks require no endorsement by the collecting official. Checks made payable to the Farm Security Administration should be endorsed by the collecting official:

"Pay to the Order of Treasurer of the United States

FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION"

Checks made payable to the order of a person other than the Treasurer of the United States or the Farm Security Administration should be endorsed by the last holder as follows:

"Pay to the Order of Treasurer of the United States

(signature of the last holder)"


[8 verso]
  • E Uncollectible Checks. When a check previously deposited and included on a schedule of collections is returned as uncollectible, it will be forwarded to the collection official with a copy of the Schedule of Uncollectible checks, Standard Form No. 1047 by the Finance area manager. The check will be returned to the original remitter only upon receipt of an amount sufficient to redeem it.
  • F Refunds If it is found necessary to make a refund to an employer, the collecting official will write a letter giving all facts to the Finance area manager at Montgomery, Alabama, for domestic labor, or at Denver, Colorado for Mexican labor requesting that the refund be given by means of a Standard Form No. 1047, "Public Voucher for Refunds", from the Special Deposits Account.
  • G Transferring Deductions for Mexican Workers.
    • 1 Transfers of savings deductions from the Special Deposits Account to the Mexican Banking Institution designated to handle such savings will be made by Standard Form No. 1047 drawn in favor of the Mexican Bank and supported by the detail listing of workers and amounts.
    • 2 In the appropriate space on Standard Form No. 1047 will be inserted the notation:
    • "This refund is made pursuant to the `Arrangement for the Temporary Migration of Mexican Agricultural Workers into the United States' concluded between the United States and Mexican Governments by the formal exchange of notes on August 4, 1942."

Attachments:
Exhibits A and B


1

Exhibit A: Check Sheet for Inspection of Housing and Sanitary Facilities

figure


1

Exhibit B: Advice of Approval of Housing and Sanitary Facilities for Agricultural Workers

FSA Instruction 478.3 (Form FSA-506)
8-25-42

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
Advice of Approval of Housing and Sanitary
Facilities for Agricultural Workers
__________
(Date)
To: U. S. EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
Attention: __________
__________
(Address)

The housing and sanitary facilities of __________ inspected at __________ are approved for the residence of transported workers under the Farm Labor Transportation Program, provided that the total number of persons housed in these facilities does not exceed single persons, and separate family groups as shown on the reverse hereof, during the time transported workers are housed.

The "itemized notice" on the reverse shows the approved capacity for each separate room, cabin, or unit, stated in terms of (a) maximum size of the family which may be housed there, and (b) maximum number of single persons who may be housed there.

If this employer makes necessary arrangements with the USES in support of his order for transported workers, the Farm Security Administration under its Transportation Program will attempt to bring into the area for employment by him and residence in these facilities, a total of not more than __________ persons (workers and non-working members of their families).

These transported workers, and their family members, are to be housed in the facilities here certified, provided that during the period when they are so housed, the total number of all persons living in these facilities does not exceed the limits certified for each unit on the reverse hereof.

We wish to call attention to the fact that the FSA Farm Labor Transportation Program does not concern itself with the number of persons or families housed in these facilities, excepting during the periods when transported workers are in residence.

(The following does not apply if there is no FSA migratory labor camp in the area)

In addition to the above transported workers or families who may be housed in these facilities, this employer may house __________ persons, provided these additional persons are housed in the FSA camp at __________ and are supplied by him with necessary transportation daily between that camp and the site of their employment.

Sincerely yours,
(Signed)__________
Regional Director

__________
(Address)


2

FSA Instruction 478.3

The housing facilities of ____________________, at _______________________
are certified as residence for: __________________________________

                                   
Type and Designation, or Location, of Shelter  One family of not more than: OR  Single Persons to the number of not more than: 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 
(8) 
(9) 
(10) 
(11) 
(12) 
(13) 
(14) 
(15) 
(16) 

Single persons not to exceed ___ (or the equivalent in family groups, as below)

Or, not more than ___ separate family groups, of which ___ may include up to ___ members

And ____ may include up to ____ members

And ____ may include up to ____ members

And ____ may include up to ____ members

And ____ may include up to ____ members


1

[Letter from G. Sussman to J.I. Armstrong, n.d.]

PRA244 133 GOVT-CA PORTLAND ORG 25 1003A
JOHN I ARMSTRONG-
30 VAN NESS AVE SFRAN-

RETEL. ONE NO AGREEMENT WAS REACHED OR IMPLIED WHICH WOULD
REQUIRE ARIZONA COTTON GROWERS TO PROVIDE COMPENSATION
INSURANCE COVERING MEXICAN WORKERS. AGREEMENT WAS MEXICAN
WORKERS WOULD RECEIVE SAME TREATMENT AS DOMESTIC WORKERS.
EXTREMELY DESIRABLE ADMINISTRATIVELY THAT ARIZONA COTTON
GROWERS PROVIDE COMPENSATION INSURANCE OR COME UNDER
STATE COMPENSATION ACT IF PERMITTED BY STATUTE. NO
REQUIREMENT FOR SUCH INSURANCE IF DOMESTIC WORKERS. ARE
TRANSPORTED. TWO INTENT OF ORIGINAL MEXICAN AGREEMENT AND
OF WORK AGREEMENT THAT THIRTY CENTS PER HOUR MINIMUM BE
PAID ANY EVENT. PERIOD APPLICABLE SHOULD BE SINGLE PAY
PERIOD THAT IS ONE WEEK THUS MEXICAN WORKERS SHOULD
RECEIVE AT LEAST AVERAGE OF THIRTY CENTS PER HOUR FOR
ALL HOURS WORKED DURING EACH WEEK. THIS WILL PERMIT THEIR
EARNING LESS THAN THIRTY CENTS FOR A PARTICULAR HOUR DURING
A PARTICULAR WEEK. CONFIRMING LETTER FOLLOWS-

GILBERT SUSSMAN.


1

[Letter from J.I. Armstrong to G. Sussman, September 24, 1942]

521-5
9/25/42 A

MR. GILBERT SUSSMAN
REGIONAL ATTORNEY
FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
TERMINAL SALES BUILDING
PORTLAND, OREGON

September 24, 1942
4:20 P.M.

TWO QUESTIONS FROM ARIZONA RE COTTON PICKERS. ONE - WAS ANY AGREEMENT REACHED OR IMPLIED IN NEGOTIATIONS IN MEXICO WHICH WOULD REQUIRE ARIZONA COTTON GROWERS TO PROVIDE COMPENSATION INSURANCE COVER MEXICAN WORKERS INASMUCH AS STATE COMPENSATION LAWS SPECIFICALLY EXEMPT AGRICULTURAL WORKERS? DO YOU KNOW OF ANY REQUIREMENT FOR SUCH INSURANCE IF TRANSPORTED WORKERS CAME FROM DOMESTIC SOURCES? TWO - ALTHOUGH PIECE RATE COTTON PICKING WORKER OF AVERAGE ABILITY WOULD AMOUNT TO MORE THAN THIRTY CENTS PER HOUR PROBABLY MANY MEXICAN WORKERS BECAUSE OF INEXPERIENCE WITH COTTON WOULD BE UNABLE DURING INITIAL PERIOD OF EMPLOYMENT TO AVERAGE EVEN THIRTY CENTS PER HOUR. MUST GROWERS GUARANTEE MINIMUM OF THIRTY CENTS FOR EVERY HOUR OF EMPLOYMENT? IF NOT IS IT NECESSARY THAT EVERY WORKER UPON COMPLETION OF PERIOD OF EMPLOYMENT HAVE EARNED AN AVERAGE OF AT LEAST THIRTY CENTS PER HOUR FOR ALL HOURS WORKED? IN THIS CONNECTION WORK AGREEMENT WITH MEXICAN WORKERS SPECIFICALLY PROVIDES "SAID WAGES WILL IN NO EVENT BE LESS THAN THIRTY CENTS (AMERICAN CURRENCY) PER HOUR." ADVISE.

JOHN I. ARMSTRONG


1

[Letter J.I. Armstrong to J. Farr, September 25, 1942]

R9-FSA-JIA
Account 521-6
9/25/42 P
Sept. 25, 1942
2:55 P.M.

Mr. Jesse Farr, Regional Attorney
Farm Security Administration
Industrial Building
Phoenix, Arizona

ADMINISTRATIVELY DETERMINED COTTON GROWERS SHOULD PROVIDE COMPENSATION INSURANCE IF TRANSPORTED WORKERS ARE MEXICANS. NOT REQUIRED IF DOMESTIC WORKERS ARE TRANSPORTED. AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS FOR MEXICANS WORKERS DURING ANY ONE WEEK MAY NOT BE LESS THAN 30¢ PER HOUR THUS HOURLY EARNINGS DURING FIRST FEW DAYS MIGHT BE LESS IF MADE UP DURING LATTER PART OF FIRST WEEK.

JOHN I. ARMSTRONG
JIArmstrong:EX
9/25/42


1

RECRUITMENT OF MEXICAN WORKERS

(Functions of Recruitment Crews)

I RECRUITMENT PRELIMINARIES

  • A. Certification and Authorization
    • 1. Employers request labor
    • 2. USES Field Office:
      • a. Determines need
      • b. Transmits order to USES Regional office
    • 3. USES Regional Office:
      • a. Determines availability of domestic labor
      • b. Transmits order for Mexican labor to USES National Director
      • c. Includes detailed data regarding:
        • 1) Number of workers needed
        • 2) Prevailing Wages
        • 3) Place of employment
        • 4) Period of employment
    • 4. USES National Director notifies FSA Administrator
    • 5. FSA Administrator notifies of his approval:
      • a. USES Regional Director
      • b. Coordinator of Mexican Agriculture Labor Migration
    • 6. Coordinator directs MA Director to certify housing and execute Cooperative Employment Agreements.
  • B. Recruitment Arrangements
    • 1. Coordinator wires FSA Mexican Representative (through U.S. Embassy).
      • a. Number Mexican workers needed
      • b. Employment area
      • c. Destination point
      • d. Employment period
      • e. Crop
      • f. Names of Recruitment Crew to be despatched.
    • 2. FSA Representative consults Mexican Government
    • 3. Mexican Government designates
      • a. Recruitment area
      • b. Number of workers permitted to migrate
    • 4. FSA Representative will:
      • a. Wire Coordinator:
        • 1) Describing Recruitment Area
        • 2) Describing Recruitment Point (City)
        • 3) Advising date and location of Recruitment Crew arrival
      • b. Proceed to Recruitment Point and
        • 1) Arrange for adequate office space
        • 2) Initiate publicity, with advice and consent of Mexican authorities.
    • 5. Coordinator despatches Recruitment Crew
    • 6. Crew reports to the recruitment point in Mexico, continues publicity and begins recruitment process.

2

II RECRUITMENT PROCESS

  • A. Crew Member Outside Office:
    • 1. Read posters aloud
    • 2. Dismisses obviously ineligible
    • 3. Answers general questions
    • 4. Directs others to receptionist
  • B. Receptionist:
    • 1. Filters obvious ineligibles
      • a. Under 16 years of age
      • b. Very old
      • c. Women
      • d. Family men who cannot leave their families
      • e. Non-agricultural workers
      • f. Non-native Mexican citizens
      • g. Those admitting arrest in United States
  • C. Waiting Room:
    • 1. Clerk takes names on routing cards
    • 2. Crew member gives further explanation
    • 3. Clerk hands applicant routing card and directs to doctor
  • D. Public Health Doctor:
    • 1. Examines to eliminate physically unfit
    • 2. Notes decision on routing card and initials
    • 3. Dismisses unfit
    • 4. Hands applicant card and directs to FSA Interviewer
  • E. FSA Interviewer:
    • 1. Completes general and occupational data on routing card
    • 2. Dismisses ineligibles
      • a. Non-agricultural workers
      • b. Family men, etc.
    • 3. Initials routing card
    • 4. Hands to applicant and directs to immigration officer
  • F. Immigration Officer:
    • 1. Interviews and eliminates ineligibles
    • 2. Prepares 3×5 Entry Permit Card
    • 3. Photographs
    • 4. Fingerprints
    • 5. Initials routing card
    • 6. Hands to applicant and directs him to FSA Contract Agent

  • 3
  • G. FSA Contract Agent:
    • 1. Explains contract terms
    • 2. Clerk meanwhile types contract
    • 3. Applicant executes contract
    • 4. Contract Agent executes contract
    • 5. Witnesses sign contract
    • 6. Contract Agent initials routing card
    • 7. Hands card to applicant and directs him to FSA Transportation Supervisor.
  • H. FSA Transportation Supervisor
    • 1. Explains train schedule, arrangements, etc.
    • 2. Hands applicant serially-numbered trip envelope and necessary number of baggage tags.
    • 3. Numbers routing card and contracts with numbering machine to correspond with envelope number.
    • 4. Instructs applicant of date, hour and location of assembly points and car number where he is to report ready for travel.
    • 5. Dismisses applicant
    • 6. Hands routing card to clerk.
  • I. Clerk:
    • 1. Prepares train car envelope lists, one for each car
    • 2. Files routing card alphabetically
    • 3. Files rejected cards (picked up from Doctor, Interviewer, Immigration Officer, Contract Agent and Transportation Supervisor) separately.
  • J. Authorization
    • 1. Immigration officer mails 3×5 Entry Permit Cards to border
    • 2. Border returns cards, indicating rejections.
    • 3. Immigration officer signs approved cards.
    • 4. Doctor signs approved cards.
    • 5. Crew Manager signs approved cards
    • 6. Clerk staples one copy of cards to one copy or contracts
    • 7. Seals rejected contracts in envelope
    • 8. Clerk cancels rejected names on train car envelope list
    • 9. Clerk inserts loose contracts and cards in respective train car envelopes.
    • 10. Clerk clips stapled cards and contracts to outside of respective train car envelopes.

4

III TRANSPORTATION PROCESS:

  • A. Arrangements:
    • 1. During the recruitment process, a Transportation Supervisor will, with the cooperation of railway personnel and a representative of the United States Office of Defense Transportation, arrange for required trains and cars at designated times and loading points.
    • 2. In the event of delayed train schedules at assembly points, the Transportation Supervisor will be responsible for arranging for food and shelter for waiting workers.
  • B. Assembly:
    • 1. Collect workers at assembly point, separating out those without envelopes.
    • 2. Group workers by car envelope list.
    • 3. Transportation Supervisor on platform calls names and numbers by cars.
    • 4. Doctor at train door checks worker using routing cards.
    • 5. Transportation Supervisor in vestibule identifies worker with picture on Entry Permit card.
    • 6. Inserts Entry Permit card and stapled contract in worker's envelope.
    • 7. Admits worker into car.
    • 8. Train sealed.
  • C. Trip:
    • 1. Transportation Supervisor explains working conditions, need for electing leader, etc.
    • 2. Workers elect leaders in groups of from 25 to 50.
    • 3. Change trains at border.
      • a. Sterilize baggage if required.
      • b. Check off and on.
  • D. Arrival at Destination Point:
    • 1. Half a day before arrival, Assistant FSA Field Agent boards train with Employment Distribution envelopes.
    • 2. Assistant Field Agent and Transportation Supervisor arrange distribution of workers to trucks and camps.
    • 3. Train arrives at destination; met by Field Agent in Charge and employers' trucks.
    • 4. Transportation Supervisor transfers Case Records to Field Agent.
    • 5. Transportation Supervisor and Field Station Staff load workers on employers' trucks.
    • 6. Transportation Supervisor joins Field Station Staff.

5

IV DISTRIBUTION

  • A. Transportation to Housing
    • 1. Field Supervisor loads on employers' trucks
    • 2. Trucks take groups to camps
    • 3. Assistant Field Supervisors immediately make rounds of camps to insure:
      • a. Adequate housing arrangements
      • b. Adequate food arrangements
      • c. Placement of names on payrolls
      • d. All present

1

CASH COLLECTION AND REFUNDS (PROGRAM FOR THE RECRUITMENT AND TRANSPORTATION OF DOMESTIC AND MEXICAN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS)

DISTRIBUTION: All Recruitment Crew Members.
(9-7-42)
FSA Instruction 478.3

I GENERAL:

The Agent-Cashiers Bond, Form 1671E, revised, covers only Disbursing Activities. Under no circumstances will an Agent-Cashier ever make collections of any kind unless directed to do so (other than the collection of a disallowed amount). If it is determined that he is to make collections, it will be necessary that he file an additional bond with the Farm Security Administration. This type of bond will be supplied by the Director of the Management Division for Domestic Labor or by the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration.

II SCHEDULING COLLECTIONS:

  • A All collections taken in during the day will be included on a schedule of collections, Standard Form 1044 (see exhibit) for that day. This form will be supplied in snap-out packs containing the requisite original and six copies, and will be made up as follows:
    • 1 Schedule No. - A serial number starting at 1 for each Transportation Supervisor.
    • 2 Sheet No. "1" of "1".
    • 3 Department or Establishment - U. S. Department of Agriculture.
    • 4 Bureau or Office - Farm Security Administration.
    • 5 Received by - G. F. Allen, Chief Disbursing Officer, at Atlanta, Georgia, for Domestic Labor, and at Denver, Colorado, for Mexican Labor.
    • 6 Period - Leave this space blank.
    • 7 D. O. Symbol No. - This number will be furnished by contacting the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer at Montgomery, Alabama, for Domestic Labor, and the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer at Denver, Colorado, for Mexican Labor.
    • 8 Date Received - Accounting day for which the schedule is being prepared.
    • 9 Receipt Number - Start with number 1 for each Transportation Supervisor.

    • 2
    • 10 Name of Remitter and Detail Description of Purpose for Which Collections were received - "Collections for 200 mile guarantee at $5.00 per person."
    • 11 Amount: The total of all collection receipts issued during the accounting day.
    • 12 Fund to be Credited: Special deposits - the proper number will be obtained from the Area Finance Office at Denver, Colorado, for Mexican Labor, and at Montgomery, Alabama, for Domestic Labor.
    • 13 Total: The total of the Amount Column.
    • 14 Forwarded: The date on which the Schedule is transmitted to the Disbursing Officer.
    • 15 By: Name of collection officer.
    • 16 Title: Title of collection officer.

All other items will be left blank.

  • B Distribution of Schedule Copies: The original and six copies of the schedule of collections will be distributed as follows:
    • 1 Original and three copies to the Disbursing Officer. To these copies will be attached the Money Order or checks. Two copies will be returned by the Disbursing Officer to the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer who will mail one copy to the Collection Official as a receipt.
    • 2 One copy to the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer.
    • 3 One copy to the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer for transmittal to Communications and Records.
    • 4 One copy to be held by the Collection Official.

III DEPOSITING COLLECTIONS WITH DISBURSING OFFICERS:

  • A The collecting official will transmit all of one day's collections with the proper number of schedules of collections as provided in paragraph II B above, directly to the appropriate U. S. Treasury Disbursing Office by first-class mail. Personal checks, certified checks, bank drafts and money orders will be transmitted as received and the collection official will convert any cash received into postal money orders payable to the Treasurer of the United States.
  • B The collection official will make himself known to the local postmaster by means of his identification card, and will prepare an application or applications for sufficient number of postal money orders of one hundred dollars ($100) each and/or one money order of less than one hundred dollars, ($100) to balance to the total of cash presented, payable to the Treasurer of the United States and drawn on the postmaster of the city in which the U. S. Treasury Disbursing Officer is located.
    • 1 Fees covering the purchase of postal money orders will be paid by means of Standard Form No. 1034. One copy of Standard Form No. 1034 and three
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      yellow copies of Standard Form No. 1034a will be prepared by the collection official. Receipt stubs for postal money orders purchased must be attached to the original of the voucher given to the postmaster, together with two yellow copies of Standard Form No. 1034A. A notation will be made on the face of the postal money order application reading. "Fees paid by Standard Form No. 1034". If required by the postmaster, one additional copy of Standard Form No. 1034a will be made for his files.
    • 2 The postmaster, at the close of business on the last day of each month, will transmit the original and two yellow copies of the voucher or vouchers with the receipt stubs attached, in an envelope addressed to the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer in Montgomery, Alabama, for Domestic Labor, and to Denver, Colorado, for Mexican Labor.
    • 3 Where possible, checks will be drawn payable to the Treasurer of the United States. Such checks require no endorsement by the Collecting Official.

a Checks made payable to the Farm Security Administration or endorsed by the collecting official:

"Pay to the Order of Treasurer of the United States Farm Security Administration"

b Checks made payable to the order of a person other than the Treasurer of the United States or the Farm Security Administration should be endorsed by the last holder as follows:

"Pay to the Order of Treasurer of the United States (signature of the last holder)"

IV UNCOLLECTIBLE CHECKS:

When a check previously deposited and included on a schedule of collections is returned as uncollectible, it will be forwarded to the Collection Official with a copy of the Schedule of Uncollectible Checks, Standard Form 1044, by the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer. The check will be returned to the original remittee only upon receipt of an amount sufficient to redeem it.

V REFUNDS:

If it is found necessary to make a refund to a farmer, the collecting official will write a letter giving all facts to the Assistant Chief Fiscal Officer at Montgomery, Alabama, for Domestic Labor, or at Denver, Colorado, for Mexican Labor, requesting that the refund be given by means of a Standard Form 1047 voucher from the Special Deposit Accounts.


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INSTRUCTIONS FOR AGENT-CASHIERS

(Program for the Recruitment and Transportation of Domestic and Mexican Agricultural Workers)
FSA Instruction 320.1

I DESIGNATION OF AGENT-CASHIER:

  • A An agent-cashier is an employee of the FSA who, having been recommended to the Treasury Department by the Chief, Migratory Camps Section, MA Division, Washington, D. C., or the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration, has been so designated by the Chief Disbursing Officer and delegated authority to perform certain disbursing functions under paragraph 2, section 4 of Executive Order 6166, dated June 10, 1933.
  • B In the performance of such disbursing activities the agent-cashier is held personally liable and responsible to the Chief Disbursing Officer and the Division of Disbursement.
  • C Each person designated as an agent-cashier must furnish a surety bond, Treasury Form No. 1671E, in the amount of $3500 acceptable to the Secretary of the Treasury, which must be approved before the agent-cashier can function as such. His designation specifies the type of payments that are to be made by the agent. Reimbursements or replenishments of the funds will be made to the agent-cashier upon receipt of expenditure documents as hereinafter provided.
  • D After the proper bond form has been taken out by the agent-cashier, it will be sent via air mail to the Director of the MA Division for domestic labor, or to the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration. Upon receipt of the form, by the above named officials, the bond will be signed as administratively approving it and it will then be sent to the Chief Disbursing Officer, Mr. G. F. Allen, Attention: Mr. E. J. Brennan, along with a letter.
  • E Agent-cashiers may receive communications from the Division of Disbursement pertaining to matters of disbursement and accounting for advanced funds. Agent-cashiers may communicate directly with the Division of Disbursement in matters pertaining to disbursements and accounting for funds advanced to them. They will, however, send copies of such correspondence to the Director of the MA Division for domestic labor and to the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration for the Mexican Labor.

II OBTAINING AND SAFEGUARDING CASH:

  • A When the agent-cashier has been advanced funds by checks, he will exchange these checks for cash as the cash is needed. It is suggested that the agent-cashiers use the checks bearing the oldest date (or date of original advance) before using any replenishment checks, as all checks become non-negotiable one year after the close of the fiscal year in which they are drawn.
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    Any checks in the hands of agent-cashiers which become non-negotiable will cause the agent-cashier difficulty and considerable delay in obtaining replacement as well as cause difficulty in the advance account. Agent-cashiers should, therefore, watch check dates closely and forward any checks to the Chief Disbursing Officer sufficiently in advance of the expiration date of the period of negotiability (approximately one month) to permit that officer to cancel such checks and issue another check as an additional advance, if so requested.
  • B Under no circumstance should agent-cashiers' funds be intermingled with private or other funds. However, as cash is carried at his own risk, the agent-cashier should see that the amount of cash on hand at all times is kept to a minimum consistent with the local available facilities for properly safe-guarding it from loss, by theft, or otherwise. In the event of loss or theft of disbursing funds, all facts should be reported immediately to the Chief Disbursing Officer and the local Secret Service representative.
  • C Whenever possible the agent-cashier should require the use of standard forms or other approved forms of vouchers and receipts for making disbursements.
  • D Funds of agent-cashiers may not be transferred from the agent-cashier to another without prior approval of the Chief Disbursing Officer, as the agent-cashier is individually responsible and accountable under his bond to the Chief Disbursing Officer, for the amount of the advance. Therefore, agent-cashiers who may desire to be absent from their post of duty will give ample notification and account for their funds to the Chief Disbursing Officer prior to their separation or departure.
  • E If a temporary absence is anticipated by the agent-cashier, it would seem that the payment of bills could be so arranged as to permit such absence without the advance of new funds to an alternate. However, the duties of an agent-cashier cannot be delegated. If anyone is permitted to act for the agent-cashier, such act would be at the agent-cashier's risk and without authority or sanction of the Chief Disbursing Officer.
  • F In cases of foreseen and anticipated absence on the part of the regular agent-cashier which is not of a temporary nature, he will make an accounting to the officer who made the advance in order that he may be given credit for the amount disbursed and the balance returned, and the officer who made the advance may then make the full advance to another bonded agent for use during the period of absence of the regular agent-cashier..
  • G If the agent-cashier becomes absent on emergency leave without having accounted for the funds advanced to him, and it is expected that the absence and inability to render an accounting will continue for a considerable
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    period of time, an accounting may be prepared and submitted as follows: The officer who made the advances to such agent-cashier will request the Director, MA Division, Washington, D. C., or the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration as the case may be, to appoint a committee or board of three members to make a statement of the account of the agent-cashier, and such statement, together with paid vouchers and cash, will be forwarded by the committee or board to the officer who made the advance. Such accounting must be submitted for and in the name of the agent-cashier. In such instances, Treasury Form No. 1655, "Statement of Account of Funds Intrusted to Agent-Cashier", will be signed for the agent-cashier by the board member or his successor.
  • H Agent-cashier on Foreign Service.
    • 1 Agent-cashiers on foreign service will be governed by all the foregoing instructions.
    • 2 To obtain cash in foreign currency the agent-cashier will take one or a number of advance checks to the nearest American (United States) Branch Bank or Correspondent Bank, which can be located by contact with the local United States Consular Office. The check will be presented to the Bank for the purchase of the desired foreign currency. A written statement should be obtained from an official of the Bank, setting forth the amount of United States currency exchanged, and the exchange or conversion rate. This rate will then be used in reporting all transactions until the currency obtained thereunder has been expended. If an exchange fee is paid, a receipt shall be obtained therefor from the Bank, and such receipt used as a subvoucher for attachment to petty expense Voucher, Standard Form. No.1034.
    • 3 The foreign currency obtained should be placed in a safe place under the immediate control of the agent-cashier. The United States equivalent of the foreign currency should be recorded in the ledger accounts as explained hereinafter.
    • 4 In the event of loss or theft of Disbursing funds all facts should be immediately reported to the nearest United States Consul and a copy of the report forwarded to the Chief Disbursing Officer and to the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration.
    • 5 When Vouchers are paid in foreign currency, the amounts due and paid thereon must be stated in foreign currency, and immediately under the approved amount in foreign currency the agent-cashier must show the equivalent value in United States currency, based on the conversion rates in effect at the time the cash was obtained. The conversion rate must also be shown. If the funds from which payments are made were obtained under different conversion rates, the total payments under each rate will be shown separately, the conversion rates indicated, and the total amount paid figured and shown in United States currency accordingly.

    • [2 verso]
    • 6 If the agent-cashier has United States currency as well as foreign currency in his possession he will record the foreign currency separately in an account subsidiary to the cash account, and which must show the conversion rate and United States equivalent. However, if he has no United States currency the cash account will be kept in foreign currency with notation as to the conversion rate and the United States equivalent.

III ACCOUNTS:

  • A The agent-cashier will maintain currently a record of all advances received and cash payments made, using for this purpose Standard Form No.1014M, "Disbursing Office Ledger". This record will be kept in running form, all transactions to be entered thereon as soon as such transactions occur. Postings shall show date, amount, and suitable legend describing the transaction in sufficient detail as to enable ready identification. The following ledger accounts on Standard Form No. 1014M shall be established by the agent-cashier.
    • Debit Accounts
    •     (1) Disbursing Officers' Checks
    •     (2) Cash
    •     (3) Liquidated Vouchers
    • Credit Accounts
    •     (4) Advance Account
  • B Entries will be made as follows:
    • 1 Upon receipt of initial advance checks and replacement checks, the amounts thereof will be posted as a debit to "Disbursing Officers' Checks" and as a credit to "Advances".
    • 2 Upon cashing a check to meet cash requirements, the amount thereof will be posted as a debit to "Cash" and as a credit to "Disbursing Officers' Checks".
    • 3 Upon payment in cash of vouchers, or emergency purchases, each payment itemized as to date and subvoucher number will be posted as a debit to "Liquidated Vouchers" and as a credit to "Cash" in the total amount.
    • 4 Upon transmittal of accounts to the Disbursing Officer who made the advance the total amount of the reimbursement voucher will be posted as a debit to "Advance Account" and as a credit to "Liquidated Vouchers".
    • 5 Upon return of a rejected receipt or subvoucher, the amount thereof will be posted in detail as debits to "Liquidated Vouchers" and the total as a credit to "Advance Account". Where rejected subvouchers are returned because they are incomplete and such subvouchers may be perfected without changing the amounts involved, they may be resubmitted along with other subvouchers in the next account. However, where rejected subvouchers involve a disallowance and collection, the amount shall be collected as
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      as soon as possible from the payee or the employee responsible for the erroneous payment. Cash so collected shall be posted as a debit to "Cash" and as a credit to "Liquidated Vouchers".

IV DISBURSEMENTS:

  • A For the purpose of expediting procurement of miscellaneous purchases and incidental expenses (not personal services) where the amount of the individual cash payment is small, the Director of the MA Division for domestic labor or the Coordinator of Mexican Agricultural Labor Migration may request the agent-cashier to make the purchase. In such cases it will not be necessary to prepare a Standard Form No. 1034 "Public Voucher for Purchases other than Personal", in each case. The agent-cashier will obtain from the vendor an itemized receipt for each transaction on Standard Form No. 1012d, "Receipt for Cash", or similar form, or on vendor's invoice. Periodically, these cash receipts will be taken upon reimbursement Voucher, Standard Form No. 1034. In all other cases of miscellaneous purchases or incidental expenses (not personal services), an itemized Voucher, Standard Form No. 1034, bearing signature of vendor in the proper place or accompanied by a properly itemized and certified invoice should be used in each case. Receipt for cash payment should be obtained from the vendor in the space provided at the foot of the original Standard Form No. 1034.
  • B For cash payments in the Republic of Mexico all items of subsistence including clothing, meals, medical care and the rental of office space and equipment shall be accomplished through cash payments. The transportation of the workers and Government employees shall be accomplished, wherever possible, by the issuance of Standard Form No. 1028, "Government Request for Transportation". The rental of office space and equipment and the purchase of miscellaneous office supplies shall be accomplished by cash payment, but such continuing services as the leasing of office space and equipment, telephone and other public utility services or any other services shall be covered by a written form of contract in which appropriate provision shall be made for the payment of the obligations in cash.
  • C For cash payments within the continental limits of the United States, items of subsistence including meals, clothing and incidentals shall be obtained by cash payment only when purchase orders are unacceptable by the vendors, or when the transportation of the farm workers and Government employees by common carrier cannot be accomplished by the issuance of Government Requests for Transportation. All items and services involved in medical care of the workers should be paid for in cash at the time the items are procured or the services rendered. The rental of office space and equipment, the installation of telephone and other public utility services and the shipment of things should be accomplished through the use of standard lease and contract forms and Government bills of lading. Cash payments should be made for the above only when the obtaining of the space or services is unacceptable to the lessors, contractors or carriers. When grant payments are made in cash, a receipt must be obtained from the worker who receives the grant.

[3 verso]

V REIMBURSEMENTS:

  • A Once each month, or more often if necessary, the agent-cashier shall render his account through the Finance area manager (located at Denver, Colorado, for Mexican labor, and at Montgomery, Alabama, for domestic labor) to the Regional Disbursing Officer to restore his working fund to the $1500 balance, accompanied by a covering Voucher in favor of himself on Standard Form No. 1034, on which he will claim reimbursement as per subvouchers attached.
  • B Unless otherwise instructed, agent-cashiers who have been previously authorized by the Chief Disbursing Officer to make various classes of payment, will submit separate reimbursement vouchers and schedules for each of the following:
  • 1 Miscellaneous payments including local purchases of supplies and equipment and rental
    • 2 Payments for subsistence grants
    • 3 Medical care
    • 4 Travel payments
  • C In the body of the Standard Form No. 1034 the subvoucher will be listed by number in serial sequence, date paid, name of vendor and amount. On the face of the Voucher will be shown the total amount and approved amount. The original subvouchers should be securely attached to the original Standard Form No. 1034. The covering Vouchers, Standard Form No. 1034, will be signed by the agent-cashier in the space that would ordinarily be used for the signature of a vendor in connection with the purchase of supplies. When the Standard Form No. 1034 with all attachments arrives in the Finance area office it will be certified, scheduled and sent to the proper Disbursing officer for payment. (The covering Vouchers will be accompanied by a Standard Form No. 1064, "Schedule of Disbursement", in an original and two copies, prepared in the Finance area office, and Treasury Form No. 1655, "Statement of Account Funds Intrusted to Agent-Cashiers", in an original and four copies, prepared by the agent-cashier, one copy of Treasury Form No. 1655 being held by the agent-cashier, three copies for the Treasury Disbursing office and one copy for the Finance area office. If separate reimbursement checks are desired totaling the amount of the claim, the denominations should be specified on the Treasury Form No. 1655.
  • D In the submission of Vouchers which are to be applied in whole or in part to the liquidation of advances or closing of advance accounts, appropriate notation should be made on the Voucher and Schedule and the accompanying Treasury Form No. 1655.
  • E Return of cash to liquidate advances or close the account will be made to the officer who made the advance or deposited in accordance with his instructions and Treasury Form No. 1655 completed to show the action taken.

  • 4
  • F If the authorized certifying officer takes exception to any subvouchers paid by the agent-cashier he should attach to the subvoucher a letter or memorandum stating his reasons for rejection and reduce the amount of the covering Voucher accordingly. The rejected subvouchers with the attachments, however, must be sent to the disbursing officer who made the advance along with the approved Standard Form No. 1034 so that the Disbursing officer may note the exception on the reverse side of Treasury Form No. 1655, and return the rejected items to the agent-cashier. Such rejections taken either by an authorized certifying officer or by a Disbursing officer will be resubmitted on the next Standard Form No. 1034 with the proper explanation under a separate caption entitled, "Resubmission".
  • G Under no circumstances should any administrative or certifying officer change figures or amounts shown on Treasury Form No. 1655.

VI ACTION BY A RESIGNING AGENT-CASHIER IN RETURNING THE CHANGE FUND:

  • A Since the cash advanced to an agent-cashier is not drawn against FSA funds but is paid directly from the Regional Disbursing officer's Official Checking Account, such funds should be returned to this account when an agent-cashier resigns. To accomplish this the following procedure should be followed.
  • B Cash on Hand: Any unused balance should be remitted to the Disbursing officer by postal money order, made payable to the "Treasurer of the United States" and scheduled to the applicable Disbursing Officer's Official Checking Account, through the Finance area office. The name of the agent-cashier for whose credit the deposit is being made should be clearly indicated on the Schedule of Collections.
  • C Receipts on hand should be listed on a Standard Form No. 1034, in the usual manner and payable to the agent-cashier. The Standard Form No. 1034 will be scheduled on Standard Form No. 1064 and processed through the Finance area office to the Disbursing officer from whom the original advance was received.
  • D After the above steps have been completed, all documents, together with the agent-cashier's final "Statement of Funds Intrusted to Agent-Cashiers" (Treasury Form No. 1655) in an original and four copies should be forwarded to the Disbursing officer through the Finance area office. Appropriate notation should be included on the Treasury Form No. 1655, indicating that the Voucher is to be applied to the liquidation of the advance and that the total amount of the documents forwarded in the final accounting equals the total amount advanced to the agent-cashier from the official checking account of the Disbursing officer.

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VII REPORTS:

Treasury Form No. 1655 will be submitted with each Standard Form No. 1034 for reimbursement, replenishment of funds, or advance credit. It must also be submitted once each month, regardless of transactions, to the Disbursing office which made the original advance, so as to reach that office not later than the twenty-fifth of the month. As vouchers and reports are to be submitted through the Finance area office for certification, it will be necessary that they be received by the Finance area office not later than the twenty-second of the month in order that the above date will be met. In addition, the agent-cashier must report through the Finance area office to the Disbursing officer who made the original advance, cash on hand as of December 31, March 30, June 30 and September 30 of each year or whenever requested to do so by the Chief Disbursing Officer or his representative. The cash on hand report should not include paid vouchers on hand.


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PROJECT DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATING COSTS REGION AND WASHINGTON

FSA Instruction 368.2

I SCOPE:

This instruction prescribes the methods to be used by regional Cost Accounting units for reporting the costs of work performed under Work Orders on projects, the reconciliation of cost accounts and fund accounts, the liquidation of completed Work Orders, the distribution of costs to capital and non-capital expense and to General Ledger accounts as well as those to be used in the Cost Accounting section of the FC Division for the preparation of consolidated cost reports. The principles of cost accounting in the FSA and methods to be used by designated officials in recording, accumulating, consolidating, reconciling and reporting the costs of work performed under Work Orders is presented in FSA Instruction 368.1.

II RECEIVING AND AUDITING FIELD COST REPORTS:

Form FSA 210, "Field Cost Report", should be received from the project within five days after the end of the reporting period. If any report is not received on time, a communication should be sent to the community manager or camp manager reminding him that it is overdue. When Form FSA 210 is received, it will be examined for form, the amounts on both front and back verified, the total reconciliation for all Work Orders under the designated official for the reporting period checked, and adjustments noted for subsequent transfer to the reverse side of Form FSA 212, "Regional Cost Report". The community manager or camp manager should also be advised as to any mistakes in preparing the Form. The Finance regional manager is authorized to write directly to community and camp managers on such matters.

III REGIONAL WORK ORDER LEDGERS:

Form FSA-359, "Regional Work Order Ledger", will be maintained in regional Cost Accounting units as a basis for preparing cost reports and in order to control cost data.

  • A One ledger form will be used for each active "Work Order". Identifying information at the top of the Form will be entered from Form FSA 206, "Work Order". Estimated data will be entered in columns 4, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 12 from Form FSA-206 and Form FSA-206A, "Work Order Change". Cost and quantity completion data will be entered in columns 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 21 from Form FSA 210, "Field Cost Report". Cumulative amounts and balances will be currently calculated and entered. Upon the completion of a "Work Order", the balance of material acquired under the "Work Order" and remaining in inventory will be entered in column 20, "Balance of Estimate". In the Case of Work Orders for the acquisition of equipment or furniture and fixtures, types B and C, entries will be made in column 20 at the bottom of the Form as follows: The inventory value of the article consisting of the gross value plus transportation if capitalized will be entered. The amount of the discount will be entered and deducted to give net cost of the article. For a salary commitment Work Order, the Balance of Estimate will be the amount contributed to other Work Orders, and the cost of Work Performed will be the amount for labor not so contributed. Job Order costs will not be entered in this ledger.
  • B Separate ledgers will be maintained for projects reporting for the calendar month and those reporting from the 16th of one month to the 15th of the following month. In each ledger two sections will be maintained: Section I - Work in Process Work Orders and Section II - Completed Work Orders. In each section ledger sheets will be arranged (1) by project, (2) by Work Order type, (3) by Work Order number. Ledger sheets for completed Work Orders will be retained in Section I until the Work Orders have been reported on Form FSA 358 on the basis of either a preliminary or final liquidation, until the changes resulting from the issuance of a liquidation Work Order Change have been posted and until the costs during the final period have been reported on Form FSA 212. When these actions have been completed, the ledger sheet will be removed from Section I and when the recapitulation of completed work on Form FSA 212 has been prepared for the month, will be inserted in Section II.

[1 verso]

IV REPORTING WORK IN PROCESS:

Form FSA 212, "Regional Cost Report", will be used by Finance regional offices for reporting monthly Work Order costs. The Form will be prepared in an original and not less than four copies by the regional Cost Accounting unit for distribution within ten days after the period being reported as follows: Original to the FC Division for the Cost Accounting section, one copy to the issuing official, one copy to the designated official, one copy to regional Communication and Record section and one copy to be retained for the files of the regional Cost Accounting unit. The copy for the issuing official may be referred to the assistant regional director, RP. Additional copies may be prepared as required for special purposes. When uncompleted Contract Work Orders are being reported current copies of Form FSA 167, "Periodical Estimate For Partial Payment NO._____" and Form FSA-BM 178, "Periodical Estimate For Partial Payment No._____" will be attached to the original of Form FSA 212.

  • A One Form will be used for each project. Costs will be reported for each uncompleted "Work Order" and each "Work Order" which was completed during the month being reported. Work Orders will be arranged on the report by Work Order types. Costs for the period will be posted from the corresponding columns of the "Regional Work Order Ledger". For Work Orders completed during the month, entries will be made in column 22, "Balance in Inventory from Work Order", in case more materials were acquired than used under the "Work Order". In the case of completed Work Orders for the acquisition of equipment and furniture and fixtures, types B and C, the inventory value consisting of the gross cost plus transportation if capitalized will be entered in column 22 and the discount will be shown as a separate entry in red in the columns under "Cost of Work Performed".
  • B Job Order costs will not be reported on a monthly basis unless the FC Division specifically requests that they be so reported for certain Work Orders in order to show more complete cost detail. In such cases the Job Order descriptions will be obtained from copies of the Job Orders and the costs will be obtained from the Field Cost Report.
  • C On the reverse side of the Form, the table "Adjustments in Field Cost Report for " will be filled in giving the document reference, type of adjustment, and amounts of adjustments by Labor, Materials, Equipment, Other and Total. This will provide the designated officials with information as to amounts of adjustments and the basis for making them.
  • D A recapitulation of the Work Order costs for the region will be made on Form FSA 212 in an original and one copy. The recapitulation will be prepared in an original and one copy. The original will be signed and forwarded to the FC Division for the Cost Accounting section together with the other reports on Form FSA 212 and the copy will be filed in the regional Cost Accounting unit. Recapitulations will be made for work in process and for completed work according to the project types: (1) Resettlement, (2) Defense, (3) Water Conservation and Utility and (4) Migratory Labor. For each type of project and each reporting period, recapitulations will be made (1) by project, (2) by Work Order type. Recapitulations will be submitted with work in process reports for both the periods ending on the 15th and the last of the month, but completed work will only be recapitulated at the end of the month. Changes resulting from final liquidation following preliminary liquidation will be reflected in reconciliations of completed work. Work Orders completed during a month will be included in the work in process recapitulation for the month and not in the completed work recapitulation.

V REPORTING NON-WORK ORDER COSTS:

Costs for the phases for which Work Orders are not required will be reported through the use of Form FSA 417, "Non-Work Order Expenditure Distribution Report". The Cost Accounting unit will prepare this Form in an original and two copies for each appropriation


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applicable to one project for each calendar quarter in accordance with directions on the back of the Form. The original and both copies will be signed by the regional Cost Supervisor and the Chief Accountant. Distribution will be made promptly as follows: Original to the Allotment and General Ledger Control unit, first copy to the FC Division for the Cost Accounting section and the remaining copy to be filed by the regional Cost Accounting unit.

  • A For the phases Planning or Land Acquisition, Land Cost, Management, Taxes and Insurance costs will be the same as expenditures. Amounts will be posted from For