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Finding Aid for the Arthur B. Friedman Turning Point Interviews, 1957-1962
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Table of contents What's This?

Container List

Boxes 1-4 and 6-24

[Original Reel-to-Reel Tapes and Preservation Copies]

Note

[Unavailable for use].
Box 25

Ackerman, Harry

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Ackerman, Irving

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Anderson, Bronco Billy

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Atkinson, Brooks

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Baker, Dorothy

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Barr, Ida

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Barthelmess, Richard

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1 of 2).
Box 25

Barton, James

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1 of 2).
Box 25

Calvin, Wyn

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Capra, Frank

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (3).
Box 25

Cerf, Bennett

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Conklin, Chester

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 25

Connelly, Marc

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Boxes 25, 26

Cranston, Edward

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 26

Danvers, Billy

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 26

Demarest, William

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 26

Dowling, Eddie

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 26

Elliot, G.H.

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 26

Elton, Arthur, Sir

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 26

Freedley, George

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 26

Freedly, Vinton

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 26

Garmes, Lee

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 26

Gaxton, William

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 26

Gielgud, John

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 26

Gish, Dorothy

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 26

Gish, Lillian

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 27

Gleason, James

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 27

Hail Variety

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 27

Henlere, Hershel

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 5

Hodkinson, W.W.

Physical Description: Transcripts (2).
Box 5

Keaton, Buster

Physical Description: Transcript (1).
Box 27

Keaton, Buster

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 27

Lane, Alfred W.

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 5

Laurel, Stan

Physical Description: Transcript (1).
Box 27

Laurel, Stan

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 27

Lawrence & Lee

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 27

Lewin, Albert

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 27

Lloyd, Harold

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 27

Lord, Del

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 27

Lupino, Barry

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (3).
Box 5

Macgowan, Kenneth

Physical Description: Transcript (1).
Boxes 27, 28

Macgowan, Kenneth

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 28

Mantz, Paul

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 28

Marsh, Mae

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 28

Mayer, Arthur

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 5

McGiveney, Owen

Physical Description: Transcript (1).
Box 28

McGiveney, Owen

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 28

Metropolitan Music Hall

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 28

Miller, Max

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (3).
Box 5

Moore, Victor

Physical Description: Transcript (1).
Box 28

Moore, Victor

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 28

Parsons, Louella

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Boxes 28, 29

Pickford, Mary

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (4).
Box 29

Poultney, George

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 29

Preston, Robert

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 29

Quigley, Martin

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 29

Reicher, Frank

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 29

Ritchard, Cyril

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 29

Roach, Hal

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 29

Rodgers, Richard

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 29

Rotha, Paul

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 5

Schary, Dore

Physical Description: Transcript (1).
Box 29

Schary, Dore

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 29

Schildkraut, Joseph

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 29

Scott, Arthur

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 29

Seitz, John

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 29

Sennett, Mack

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 5

Sennett, Mack

Physical Description: Transcript (1).
Box 30

Skinner, Cornelia Otis

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 30

Smith, Albert

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (5).
Box 30

Sutton, Randolph

Physical Description: Cassette tape (1).
Box 30

Trinde, Tommy

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 30

Wood, Wee Georgie

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
Box 30

Zukor, Adolph

Physical Description: Cassette tapes (2).
 

[Summaries of Select Recordings]

 

Barthelmess, Richard

Physical Description: (2 Cassette tapes, total time: 1 hour, 17 minutes)
Box 25

Richard Barthelmess.

Scope and Content Note

Reel no.1
  • 0.00 Introduction
  • 1.45 The way Mr. Barthelmess began his career
  • 8.00 His first film experience
  • 9.30 The Clair Kimball Young Film Corporation and Louis J. Selznick, Hal Brennan, and Miss Immova, War Brides (film)
  • 15.15 Margurite Clark, Florence Reed The Eternal Sin (film)
  • 16.30 The names of some of the pictures he did
  • 17.15 Hal Brennan as a director
  • 18,30 His opinion of and experience with D.W. Griffith
  • 20.00 Broken Blossoms (film - 1919)and Hearts of the World (film)
  • 28.14 End of Reel no.1
Reel no.2
  • 0.00 Broken Blossoms admission price and the way Mr. Griffith taught Mr. Barthelmess to study a part
  • 4.50 Scarlet Days (film - July 1919)
  • 6.00 The Love Flower and The Idle Dancer (films)
  • 7.15 Way Down East (film)
  • 10.15 Joseph Fergeshammer and Tol'able David (film)
  • 11.30 Experience (film)
  • 15.45 Inspiration Studios and Tol'able David directed by Henry King (film - 1921)
  • 19.15 The names of studios then in New York and the reason they moved to California (1926)
  • 21.30 The reason Mr. Barthelmess should have stayed with Inspiration Studios
  • 25.45 The Patent Leather Kid and The Enchanted Cottage (film)
  • 27.12 End of Reel no.2
Reel no.3
  • 0.00 Dawn Patrol (film-1930) and what sound pictures did at Warner Brothers Studios
  • 2.15 Weary River (film) his first talking picture
  • 5.25 Dawn Patrol and Son of the Gods (films) and how Douglas Fairbanks Jr. became a success
  • 7.35 Mr. Barthelamess' more recent pictures
  • 8.15 His George Eastman House Award
  • 18.21 End of Interview
 

Freedly, Vinton

Physical Description: (1 Cassette tape, total time: 28 minutes)
Box 26

Vinton Freedley.

Scope and Content Note

  • 0.00 How he got started in show business
  • 6.45 The role of the producer in the early 20's
  • 10.50 Why he worked so much with musical comedy
  • 11.20 In what ways the role of the producer has changed in the last 30 years
  • 12.20 He discusses how a show was financed in the 20's and how it is done now
  • 13.45 He talks about what has happened to musical comedy in the last few years and of the people he has worked with
  • 22.45 What has happened to Browdway and the audiences
  • 25.55 How his years in the theatre can be summed up
  • 26.50 His plans for the future
 

Keaton, Buster

Physical Description: (1 Cassette tape, total time: 44 minutes)

Note

[Transcript in Box 5]
Box 27

Buster Keaton.

Note

Directed by Arthur B. Friedman, Associate Professor, Department of Theatre Arts, UCLA.

Scope and Content Note

Reel no.1
  • 0.00 Introduction
  • 0.40 Mr. Friedman's Introduction
  • 1.25 When Mr. Keaton got started

    a. Hoodini and Keaton

    b. Mother and father act at age 4 in Vaudeville
  • 4.15 Child Welfare Agency trouble
  • 5.00 Keaton's schooling
  • 6.30 Hammerstein's Theater
  • 6.45 Brothers and sisters of Keaton
  • 7.15 How Keaton developed his comics
  • 8.15 How Keaton got the names stone-face and Buster
  • 8.40 How Keaton got into the movies

    a. Fattie Arbuckle
  • 10.15 Where Keaton got his plots (material)

    a. How they made up plots
  • 12.15 How comedy styles differ in silent and talking motion pictures
  • 13.15 What kind of studios Keaton had

    a. How his movie company worked
  • 15.00 What the differences are between today's movie comedy and movie comedy yesterday
  • 16.45 What worked well for Keaton by accident
Reel no.2
  • 0.00 The Navigator (film)

    a. How it came to being

    b. Story
  • 8.30 The Boat (film)
  • 10.00 Television for Keaton
  • 11.00 Fairbanks Show
  • 11.40 Recent movies of Keaton's
  • 12.20 Eastman Award
  • 13.20 The Happiest Moments of Keaton's Career
  • 14.15 Children and grandchildren of Keaton
  • 15.00 Keaton's words of wisdom
 

Laurel, Stan

Physical Description: (2 Cassette tapes, total time: 1 Hours, 14 minutes 25 seconds)

Note

[Transcript in Box 5]
Box 27

Stan Laurel.

Scope and Content Note

Reel no.1
  • 0.00 Introduction to Turning Point
  • 0.20 Dr. Friedman introduces Stan Laurel
  • 1.10 The death and funeral of Oliver Hardy
  • 2.15 Mention of the teams in comedy
  • 2.35 Discussion of the split between Hardy and Laurel
  • 3.25 Mr. Laurel discusses his long time association with Hardy
  • 3.55 Mr. Laurel explains how they stayed together for so long
  • 5.40 Mr. Laurel's reason for working with partners
  • 6.20 Discussion of Mr. Laurel's experience in films
  • 8.20 Why he was a gag man and a director
  • 8.50 His experience as a director of the old stars
  • 9.20 Babe comes into stock
  • 9.40 Leg of lamb connection
  • 10.15 Mr. Laurel begins to write self in movies while director
  • 11.30 The beginning of the Laurel and Hardy team
  • 11.45 His beginnings in a juvenile pantomime company
  • 12.15 Works in his father's dramatic theatres as a utility man
  • 12.55 Follow in father's footsteps in becoming a comic
  • 13.25 Tells of his sneak appearances in vaudeville
  • 14.00 Givers his reasons for becoming a comic
  • 15.15 His golywogg experiences in juvenile companies
  • 17.05 After a well-rounded theatrical education decides to become a boy comedian
  • 17.55 Joins Fred Carno and understudies for Chaplin
  • 18.40 Takes Chaplin's part for awhile in Jimmie the Fearless
  • 20.10 Comes to states with the company
  • 23.00 After awhile returns to England and forms Barto Brothers
  • 23.15 Known as Stanley Jefferson
  • 24.35 Suffers a bad trip with the troupe to Holland
  • 26.05 Penniless joins brother in London
  • 27.00 With promised raise rejoins Carno and comes back to the states
  • 27.45 Has no parental interference
  • 28.05 Tells of his two brothers and one sister
Reel no.2
  • 0.00 Decides to stay in the states and teams up with the Herrly's [?]
  • 1.45 Gets break and opens in Jersey City
  • 2.10 Changes name of company to Keystone Trio and becomes as success using the Chaplin mannerisms
  • 3.50 Partners' jealousy breaks up company
  • 4.50 Forms new company and drops the Chaplin mannerisms
  • 5.10 Talks about his material
  • 6.00 Forms the Stan Jefferson Trio
  • 6.20 Discusses costume with Hardy using boys' derby and later makes own
  • 7.35 Tells of the conditions of the lower theatre circuits
  • 8.40 Tells how he became connected with Hal Roach
  • 9.35 Changes name to get a bigger billing
  • 10.55 Replaces Toto in finishing out his series
  • 11.30 Never plays on Chaplin's name to get ahead
  • 11.45 Tells of Chaplin's sure fireness
  • 12.25 Why he was anxious to get into pictures
  • 13.05 Let out after finishing the Toto series
  • 13.50 Makes no attempt to create a special character
  • 14.25 Does bits with Larry Seaman
  • 14.35 Returns to the red
  • 15.00 Goes with Bronco Billy
  • 15.15 Returns again to the road comes back for a few pictures
  • 15.45 How he became a gag writer and a director
  • 16.55 Laurel and Hardy by a series of accidents
  • 17.30 Explains how he got his short hair
  • 18.20 Anything for a laugh
  • 18.30 Talks about Hardy's bangs
  • 19.00 Explains their method of shooting their pictures and why
  • 19.45 The slower we went
  • 20.10 Mr. Laurel tells of the relationship of the two characters
  • 20.50 The talking pictures come in
  • 21.15 Making their pictures as long as they happened to last
  • 21.45 Being able to make the last of the successful two reelers
  • 22.00 Sticks to silent reel methods
Reel no.3
  • 0.00 Their first talkie Unaccustomed As We Are in 1929
  • 0.20 Their first full length talkie Pardon Us and how it came about
  • 3.00 Tells of the fan letters he receives
  • 4.30 The Command Performance of Laurel and Hardy
  • 5.20 Doesn't know why he is still popular in foreign countries
  • 6.30 The universal language of silent films
  • 7.30 Where the story gags came from
  • 8.20 Off the cuff shooting technique
  • 9.20 Talks about his best pictures
  • 9.40 His return to be vaudeville stage in Europe with Hardy and why
  • 11.10 His last film in Europe and why it flopped
  • 12.25 What Mr. Laurel is currently doing
  • 13.00 His hobbies
  • 13.45 His bad health
  • 13.55 Comments on his retirement
  • 14.10 Discussion of letters of condolence
  • 15.40 Dr. Friedman reads a typical letter
  • 18.20 Thanks
  • 18.45 Cap
 

Moore, Victor

Physical Description: (2 Cassette tapes, total time: 1 hour, 22 minutes)

Note

[Transcript in Box 5]
Box 28

Victor Moore.

Scope and Content Note

Reel no.1
  • 0.00 Introduction
  • 2.38 How Mr. Moore got started
  • 5.30 Shows that he saw as a child
  • 6.15 His first shows: Hugget Hell and Crowford's Claim
  • 16.00 Change Your Act or Go Back to the Woods (vaudeville act)
  • 18.30 Early Life (vaudeville act)
  • 21.20 With John Dru in Rosemary
  • 25.00 Spiritualist (a play)
  • 27.00 Julius Caesar (a play)
  • 27.45 About his association with Mr. Erlanger
  • 29.20 End of Reel no.1
Reel no.2
  • 0.00 Mr. Moore's first variety act
  • 0.50 His description of stock company work in 1899
  • 3.45 Change Your Act or Go Back to the Woods
  • 5.30 His marriage to Emma Littlefield and his sister's death and about his mother
  • 9.14 Forty-five minutes From Broadway and Kit Burns
  • 14.40 His first motion picture, Snobs also about Jesse Lasky and C.B. DeMille
  • 16.45 The Clown and Thomas Meanne
  • 21.45 Jimmy Fadden and Jimmy Fadden Out West (two moving pictures)
  • 23.00 How they make Klever Kommedies (motion pictures)
  • 24.45 Okay, Funny Face, Of Thee I Sing, Anything Goes
  • 27.00 Gertrude Lawrence
  • 29.00 End Of Reel no.2
Reel no.3
  • 0.00 Alley Oop (play)
  • 1.00 Funny Face with Fred and Adelle Astaire
  • 1.40 Of Thee I Sing and Let `em Eat Cake
  • 7.15 How much did he lend to his roles?
  • 9.25 Louisiana Purchase (musical)
  • 12.15 His Turning Point
  • 14.00 At Hammersteins
  • 16.00 At the Palace Theatre
  • 18.30 Plans for the future
  • 19.30 How he met his wife
  • 24.00 End of Interview
 

Robinson, Edward G.

Physical Description: (2 Cassette tapes, total time: 2 hours, 52 minutes 18 seconds)
Box n/a

Edward G. Robinson.

Scope and Content Note

Reel no.1
  • 0.00 Introduction to Turning Point
  • 0.20 Introduction to Robinson
  • 1.00 Reason for residing across from the Museum of Modern Art
  • 2.30 Birthplace and early schooling
  • 3.20 University education
  • 3.58 Interest in languages, literature, drama, philosophy and his reason for
  • 4.20 His parents aspirations for his career
  • 5.05 Idea of being an actor and his amateur experience
  • 5.20 Realization of the scope of acting
  • 6.20 Reason for amateur experience
  • 7.00 Experience in university settlement house amateur group
  • 7.50 Realization of his limitations of size and appearance
  • 8.25 His feeling of having something to say
  • 9.14 The responsibility of an actor in portraying another person
  • 9.25 The actor's job of creation and not interpretation
  • 10.30 What the actor brings to the stage
  • 10.50 The value of his experience in all types of education
  • 12.00 His connection with playwriting; The Bells of Conscience and his part on Kibitzer
  • 14.30 His association with he American Academy of Dramatic Arts and the value of knowing what you want to do early in life
  • 15.05 His various ambitions: rabbi, lawyer, teacher, actor
  • 18.50 The value of his experience with the Academy
  • 20.30 Feelings on the Actor Studio and schools in general
  • 22.35 Advice to those who aspire to be actors
  • 24.05 His Theatre Guild experience
  • 24.40 His planned program and purpose in becoming an actor
  • 26.35 His amendments to his planned program and why
  • 27.50 Advice to build slowly from small parts to starring roles
  • 28.30 Example of his rise and sound pictures; from feature to star
Reel no.2
  • 0.00 Danger and temptation of rushing acting careers
  • 0.40 The result of rushing
  • 1.00 First silent film in Cuba 1923 for Richard Barthemous
  • 2.35 Illegitimacy of silent picture acting
  • 3.15 Divorcement of theatre when talking pictures came in and first film Little Caesar
  • 4.10 The attraction of Hollywood and reasons for coming to Hollywood
  • 5.20 Motion pictures made possible art collection
  • 6.00 His comments on his motion pictures
  • 6.25 After 26 years his return to Broadway in Darkness at Noon in the road company
  • 7.40 His comments on stage fright and stage preparation
  • 10.00 Paddy Chayefsky's Middle of the Night and why he took the part in it
  • 11.40 His comments on captive audiences
  • 12.50 His future plans
  • 13.40 No particular Turning Point and comment on
  • 14.45 What he would have done differently and why
  • 16.10 The value of motion picture action and its influence on his stage acting
  • 17.50 Big Town radio experience and idea of radio acting
  • 18.50 His comment on his most rewarding roles
  • 19.20 What he gets from art and the value it has had for him
  • 20.40 Dr. Friedman's thanks and invitation to visit campus
 

Sennett, Mack

Physical Description: (1 Cassette tape, total time: 30 minutes)

Note

[Transcript in Box 5]
Box 29

Mack Sennett.

Scope and Content Note

  • 0.00 Introduction to Turning Point
  • 0.20 Introduction of Mack Sennett
  • 1.10 Discussion of his theory of comic motion
  • 2.07 The difference between comic motion and pantomime
  • 2.55 Schematic reasoning to his films
  • 3.25 Comparison of his films to ballet
  • 3.55 Keystone Cops origin
  • 4.35 Use of crowd scenes
  • 7.20 Fall of dignity theory
  • 7.45 Pie throwing origination with Mable Norman
  • 8.20 Keep the camera rolling theory
  • 10.25 Bathing beauty origin (skirt to knees)
  • 13.45 Discovery of many great talents
  • 14.55 Those talents that slipped through
  • 17.20 Work best from bath-tub theory
  • 18.20 Farmer gag, Mike Foy's [?] gag
  • 19.10 This is a handy tool
  • 19.45 Development of dramatic talent
  • 20.10 no man in ladies dressing room rule
  • 22.05 Arthur Riply incident
  • 24.15 Begin the same thing! theory
  • 24.30 Trouble of keeping the laugh going
  • 25.30 No big boss-studio techniques
  • 26.30 Gateman firing incident
  • 27.20 Mother didn't discourage his dreams
  • 28.15 His turning point
  • 29.50 Cap