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Inventory of the An Inventory of the Germany (Territory Under Allied Occupation, 1945-1955) Records, 1945-1949
80196  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Collection Summary
  • Administrative Information
  • Historical Note
  • Scope and Content of Collection
  • Arrangement
  • Indexing Terms

  • Collection Summary

    Title: An Inventory of the Germany (Territory Under Allied Occupation, 1945-1955) Records, 1949-1955
    Dates: 1945-1949
    Collection Number: 80196
    Creator: Germany (Territory Under Allied Occupation, 1945-1955)
    Collection Size: 55 manuscript boxes (22 linear feet)
    Repository: Hoover Institution Archives
    Stanford, California 94305-6010
    Abstract: The records relate to demilitarization, denazification, democratization, and reconstruction of Germany after World War II. Includes minutes, reports, memoranda, laws, proclamations, press releases, agenda, and bulletins.
    Physical Location: Hoover Institution Archives
    Languages: English German

    Administrative Information

    Access

    Collection is open for research.
    The Hoover Institution Archives only allows access to copies of audiovisual items. To listen to sound recordings or to view videos or films during your visit, please contact the Archives at least two working days before your arrival. We will then advise you of the accessibility of the material you wish to see or hear. Please note that not all audiovisual material is immediately accessible.

    Publication Rights

    For copyright status, please contact the Hoover Institution Archives.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], An Inventory of the Germany (Territory Under Allied Occupation, 1945-1955) Records, 1949-1955, [Box number], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Acquisition Information

    Acquired by the Hoover Institution Archives in 1982.

    Accruals

    Materials may have been added to the collection since this finding aid was prepared. To determine if this has occurred, find the collection in Stanford University's online catalog Socrates at http://library.stanford.edu/webcat . Materials have been added to the collection if the number of boxes listed in Socrates is larger than the number of boxes listed in this finding aid.

    Related Materials

    Germany (Territory under Allied Occupation, 1945-1955: U.S. Zone) Office of Military Government for Bavaria. Kreis Traunstein Records Hoover Institution Archives
    Germany (Territory under Allied Occupation, 1945-1955: U.S. Zone) Office of Military Government Records, 1943-1950, Hoover Institution Archives

    Historical Note

    The Allied powers that defeated Nazi Germany in World War II divided the country into three zones of occupation: American, British, and Soviet. Each zone was ruled by the Commander-in-Chief of the respective occupational forces. The French zone was added in December 1946. Matters that affected Germany as a whole, however, would have to be decided jointly by all three Commanders-in-Chief, who for this purpose formed a single organ of control called the Control Council.
    The purpose of the Allied Control Council was to deal with the central administration of the country. The Potsdam Agreement of 2 August 1945 further specified the tasks of the Control Council. Key items in the occupiers' agenda were the five D's: Denazification, Democratization, Dismantling, Disarming and Decentralization.
    As relations between the Western Allies (especially the United States and the United Kingdom) and the Soviet Union quickly deteriorated, and so did their cooperation in the administration of occupied Germany. As early as in September 1946, disagreement arose regarding the distribution of coal for industry in the four occupation zones, and the Soviet representative in the council withdrew his support of the plan agreed upon by the governments of the United States, Britain and France.
    Against Soviet protests, the two English-speaking powers pushed for an economic collaboration between the different zones, and on 1 January 1947 the British and American zones merged to form the Bizone and later the Trizone (after inclusion of the French zone).
    Over the course of 1947 and early 1948 they began to prepare the currency reform that would introduce the Deutsche Mark, and ultimately the creation of an independent West German state. When the Soviets learned about this, they claimed that such plans were in violation of the Potsdam Agreement, that the Western powers were not interested in further regular four-power control of Germany, and that under such circumstances the Control Council had no purpose anymore.
    On 20 March 1948, Marshal Vasiliy Sokolsky, the Soviet representative, walked out of the meeting of the Council, never to return. As the Control Council could only act with the agreement of all four members, this move basically shut down the institution, while the Cold War reached an early high point during the Soviet blockade of Berlin.
    The Western powers instituted the Allied High Commission by September 1949 which remained in operation until 1955. In Eastern Germany, the Soviet administration with its representative of the ACC was the highest authority, later this position was converted to a High Commissioner as well, until the German Democratic Republic gained sovereignty.
    Germany remained under nominal military occupation until 15 March 1991, when the final ratification of the Treaty on the Final Settlement With Respect to Germany (signed on 12 September 1990) was lodged with the German Government.

    Scope and Content of Collection

    The records relate to demilitarization, denazification, democratization, and reconstruction of Germany after World War II. Includes minutes, reports, memoranda, laws, proclamations, press releases, agenda, and bulletins.
    The collection represents materials documenting the efforts of economic rehabilitation of Germany under Allied Control Authority Coordinating Committee (ACAC) and covers the varied national and international civilian and military apparatus that evolved.
    The documents illustrate the diverse approaches of the Americans, British, and Russians in efforts to combat hunger, disease, and crime, preserve cultural artifacts, re-establish industry and utilities, and resolve important problems involving currency, housing, education, newspapers, elections, and displaced persons.

    Arrangement

    Records are arranged as originally received from the organization; generally by Office of Military Government (U.S. Zone)

    Indexing Terms

    The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.
    Military government.
    Germany.
    Germany--History--1945-1955.