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War Relocation Authority Photographs of Japanese-American Evacuation and Resettlement, 1942-1945
BANC PIC 1967.014--PIC  
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Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-721

The St. Louis Cathedral is one of the oldest churches in America. It is situated across from Jackson Square in New Orleans and is visited by thousands of tourists every year.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

New Orleans, Louisiana. 1/12/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-722

Swans and ducks are common in the City Park. These pictures were taken on the 13th day of January, 1945. On that day several people were rowing boats and paddling canoes in the park lagoons. The temperature was 77 degrees.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

New Orleans, Louisiana. 1/13/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-723

Swans and ducks are common in the City Park. These pictures were taken on the 13th day of January, 1945. On that day several people were rowing boats and paddling canoes in the park lagoons. The temperature was 77 degrees.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

New Orleans, Louisiana. 1/13/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-724

Canal Street is a main street in New Orleans and in many respects resembles Market Street in San Francisco. This picture is taken near Canal and Baronne Streets in the heart of the business district.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

New Orleans, Louisiana. 1/12/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-725

The Louisiana Capitol Building is a monument to the late Senator Huey P. Long. It was built in the early days of the depression at a cost of $5,000,000 and completed in 14 months. The marble in the interior comes from various countries and is of exceptional beauty. The statuary at the entrance was sculptured by Laredo Taft.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-726

Masami Hata, an Issei, age 44, was for many years a gardener in San Mateo, California. At the time of evacuation he was sent to Topaz, Utah. In September 1944 he came to Louisiana in search of employment and new opportunities. He settled immediately in Baton Rouge where he is taking care of several gardens. He has found people kind and considerate and likes the community. He says the soil is rich and you can grow anything. He does not plan to return to California. In this picture Mr. Hata is at work in one of the gardens near the campus of Louisiana State University. Cold weather never interferes with outdoor work here.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-727

Masami Hata, an Issei, age 44, was for many years a gardener in San Mateo, California. At the time of evacuation he was sent to Topaz, Utah. In September 1944 he came to Louisiana in search of employment and new opportunities. He settled immediately in Baton Rouge where he is taking care of several gardens. He has found people kind and considerate and likes the community. He says the soil is rich and you can grow anything. He does not plan to return to California. In this picture Mr. Hata is at work in one of the gardens near the campus of Louisiana State University. Cold weather never interferes with outdoor work here.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-728

Masami Hata, an Issei, age 44, was for many years a gardener in San Mateo, California. At the time of evacuation he was sent to Topaz, Utah. In September 1944 he came to Louisiana in search of employment and new opportunities. He settled immediately in Baton Rouge where he is taking care of several gardens. He has found people kind and considerate and likes the community. He says the soil is rich and you can grow anything. He does not plan to return to California. In this picture Mr. Hata is at work in one of the gardens near the campus of Louisiana State University. Cold weather never interferes with outdoor work here.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-729

Masami Hata, an Issei, age 44, was for many years a gardener in San Mateo, California. At the time of evacuation he was sent to Topaz, Utah. In September 1944 he came to Louisiana in search of employment and new opportunities. He settled immediately in Baton Rouge where he is taking care of several gardens. He has found people kind and considerate and likes the community. He says the soil is rich and you can grow anything. He does not plan to return to California. In this picture Mr. Hata is at work in one of the gardens near the campus of Louisiana State University. Cold weather never interferes with outdoor work here.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-730

Sam Kohara, age 30, is the oldest son of Mrs. M. Kohara. The Kohara family moved to Alexandria, Louisiana many years ago. Mr. Kohara farmed for a short time and then opened a photographic studio in that city. The family consists of three sons and two daughters. Two of the sons are in the army. Sam, the oldest, gives part of his time to the studio and the rest to a farm which he recently purchased. The Kohara farm house has all the modern conveniences including city water, electricity, telephone and gas. Sam has a new Farmall tractor and says that he has had no serious difficulty securing farm machinery.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Alexandria, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 51, Section F, WRA no. I-731

Sam Kohara, age 30, is the oldest son of Mrs. M. Kohara. The Kohara family moved to Alexandria, Louisiana many years ago. Mr. Kohara farmed for a short time and then opened a photographic studio in that city. The family consists of three sons and two daughters. Two of the sons are in the army. Sam, the oldest, gives part of his time to the studio and the rest to a farm which he recently purchased. The Kohara farm house has all the modern conveniences including city water, electricity, telephone and gas. Sam has a new Farmall tractor and says that he has had no serious difficulty securing farm machinery.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Alexandria, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-732

Sam Kohara, age 30, is the oldest son of Mrs. M. Kohara. The Kohara family moved to Alexandria, Louisiana, many years ago. Mr. Kohara farmed for a short time and then opened a photographic studio in that city. The family consists of three sons and two daughters. Two of the sons are in the army. Sam, the oldest, gives part of his time to the studio and the rest to a farm which he recently purchased. The Kohara farm house has all the modern conveniences including city water, electricity, telephone and gas. Sam has a new Farmall tractor and says that he has had no serious difficulty securing farm machinery.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Alexandria, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-733

Mrs. M. Kohara and one of her Caucasian employees in the Kohara Studio. Mrs. Kohara manages the studio and has ten employees. She had an evacuee employee until quite recently when he was called by the army. Mrs. Kohara, in addition to the studio, owns a large substantial home in the city of Alexandria. Of the five Kohara children, four of them have attended Louisiana State University. A daughter, Dr. Kay Kohara, is a resident physician at Charity Hospital in New Orleans. The second daughter is still in high school. Sam, the oldest son, divides his time between the farm, which is about three miles from Alexandria, and the studio.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Alexandria, Louisiana. 1/9/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-734

Mr. Suenaga, on Indefinite Leave from the Manzanar Relocation Center, came to New Orleans without definite employment but immediately accepted a position where he is in charge of a greenhouse and nursery at Hattiesburg, Mississippi. He has a furnished, modern house and is awaiting his wife and two children to join him. His employer is delighted with his services and he says that he likes his work very much. Prior to evacuation Mr. Suenaga worked in a florist shop in Los Angeles.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 1/11/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-735

Mr. Suenaga, on Indefinite Leave from the Manzanar Relocation Center, came to New Orleans without definite employment but immediately accepted a position where he is in charge of a greenhouse and nursery at Hattiesburg, Mississippi. He has a furnished, modern house and is awaiting his wife and two children to join him. His employer is delighted with his services and he says that he likes his work very much. Prior to evacuation Mr. Suenaga worked in a florist shop in Los Angeles.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 1/11/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-736

This group consists of Mrs. K. R. Maruyama, S/Sgt. Kenny Okamoto, Mrs. Tommy Imamura, and Mrs. George Toriumi. These young women serve as hostesses at the USO Club, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The S/Sgt. is located at Camp Shelby.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 1/11/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-737

Mr. S. Butsuyen has owned and operated this farm for the last seven years. The farm is 1000 acres with 350 acres under cultivation. Mr. Butsuyen states the yield compares favorably with that of any part of the United States. He is shown examining lettuce. This crop was planted to be harvested about February 15. It is now ready for thinning.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

White Oak, Georgia. 1/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-738

S. Butsuyen, co-owner, Sam Hayashi, employee, H. J. Omayi, co-owner, and Jim Shinobu Tani, evacuee, are shown on the Maryfield Plantation, a farm located in the coastal area of Georgia. This farm consists of 1000 acres with 350 acres under cultivation. It was purchased by Mr. Butsuyen seven years ago and he states that he has made a success and is well satisfied. He has found the community residents friendly and neighborly. About February 15, 200 acres of iceberg lettuce will be ready to harvest. The majority of this crop is shipped to eastern markets, and brings about $4.65 per crate. The average yield per acre is 150 crates. Jim Tani, the evacuee, relocated from Minidoka. His former home was Oakland, California, where he was employed in a fruit market. In addition to his salary, Jim receives maintenance for himself and his family. His dwelling too is furnished by his employer.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

White Oak, Georgia. 1/18/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-739

Tractor preparing lettuce beds for planting. The tractor operator is T. Omayi. This photo was taken four miles from the highway between Brunswick, Georgia, and Jacksonville, Florida, 21 miles south of Brunswick in the coastal area of Georgia.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

White Oak, Georgia. 1/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-740

Mr. S. Butseyen [Butsuyen], and T. Omayi are shown on a tractor which is being used to prepare lettuce beds for planting. This farm is owned and operated by Mr. Butseyen, and is located about four miles from the highway between Brunswick, Georgia, and Jacksonville, Florida, 21 miles south of Brunswick in the coastal area of Georgia.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

White Oak, Georgia. 1/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-741

Jim Shinobu Tani, evacuee employee, H. J. Omayi, co-owner, Sam Hayashi, employee, and S. Butsuyen, co-owner, are pictured on the Maryfield Plantation, a farm located in the coastal area of Georgia. This farm consists of 1000 acres with 350 acres under cultivation. It was purchased by Mr. Butsuyen seven years ago and he states that he has made a success and is well satisfied. He has found the community residents friendly and neighborly. About February 15, 200 acres of iceberg lettuce will be ready to harvest. The majority of this crop is shipped to eastern markets, and brings about $4.65 per crate. The average yield per acre is 150 crates. Jim Tani, the evacuee, relocated from Minidoka. His former home was Oakland, California, where he was employed in a fruit market. In addition to his salary, Jim receives maintenance for himself and his family. His dwelling too is furnished by his employer.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

White Oak, Georgia. 1/18/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-742

Lettuce beds at the Maryfield Plantation located at White Oak, Georgia, in the coastal area of Georgia.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

White Oak, Georgia. 1/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-743

Lettuce beds at the Maryfield Plantation located at White Oak, Georgia, in the coastal area of Georgia.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

White Oak, Georgia. 1/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-744

Mr. Robert Taylor, WRA Relocation Officer at Savannah, Georgia, is seen looking over a field of broccoli which is nearly ready to harvest. The owner of the farm (right) who is shown with Mr. Taylor states that farm land in this section of the country is very productive. He also says that he could use additional Nisei or Issei help.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Beaufort, South Carolina. 1/19/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-745

A field of collards to be harvested February 1, in the coastal area of South Carolina, seven miles south of Beaufort, South Carolina.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Beaufort, South Carolina. 1/16/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-746

A field of collards to be harvested February 1, in the coastal area of South Carolina, seven miles south of Beaufort, South Carolina.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Beaufort, South Carolina. 1/16/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-747

Tractors preparing land for planting vegetables in the coastal area of South Carolina. The land shown is four miles south of Beaufort, South Carolina.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Beaufort, South Carolina. 1/16/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-748

A lettuce bed in the coastal area of South Carolina, about three miles south of Charleston. This section is specially adapted to the growing of iceberg lettuce.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Charleston, South Carolina. 1/16/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-749

A field of cabbage in the coastal area of South Carolina. This crop is now ready for harvesting. The field is about three miles south of Beaufort, South Carolina.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Beaufort, South Carolina. 1/16/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-750

A field of young collards in the coastal area, about three miles south of Beaufort, South Carolina.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Beaufort, South Carolina. 1/16/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-751

Mr. Sam Nagata came to the United States from Japan in 1905. He lived for years in Chicago but since 1927 he has had a trucking business between New Orleans and New Iberia, Louisiana. He hauls fruits and vegetables between these communities. He owns five large trucks and a home in New Orleans. His nephew, Joe Nagata, made quite a record as a football player at Louisiana State University. Joe is now serving in the Army. His parents have a fruit and vegetable market in Eunice, Louisiana.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

New Orleans, Louisiana. 1/12/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-752

Fumi Matsumoto, formerly of Pleasanton, California, and Gila River Relocation Center, Arizona; Tomi Kawakami, of Auburn, California, and Minidoka Relocation Center, Idaho; and Sonoko Matsuo, formerly of Seattle, Washington, and Minidoka Relocation Center, Idaho, are all cadet nurses at the Kansas City General Hospital, Missouri. Five Nisei girls are among the 150 student nurses at the 1,000 bed hospital. The hospital is located on hills overlooking the downtown business district of Kansas City, Missouri. The girls said they like the people on the hospital staff and everyone they met in Kansas City treated them as well as they would anyone else. Two Nisei cadet nurses are also training at St. Mary's Hospital, Kansas City, and one at Bethany Hospital in Kansas City, Kansas.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/1/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-753

Sonoko Matsuo, formerly of Minidoka Relocation Center and Seattle, Washington, studies in the Kansas City General Hospital's library. Miss Matsuo is a cadet nurse together with four other Nisei girls at the General Hospital. Two Nisei girls are also in training at St. Mary's Hospital, Kansas City, and one at Bethany Hospital in Kansas City, Kansas.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/1/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-754

Tomi Kawakami, formerly of Auburn, California, and Minidoka, does a little kibitzing over the shoulders of a Caucasian friend in the library of Kansas City General Hospital. Miss Kawakami and four other Nisei girls are cadet nurses at the hospital. Two other Nisei girls are also in training at St. Mary's Hospital, Kansas City, and one at Bethany Hospital in Kansas City, Kansas.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/1/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-755

Miss Florence M. Clarke, Director of Nursing, talks with Nisei girls enrolled in the Cadet Nurse Training Corps at Kansas City General Hospital, Missouri. The girls are Riyeko Kikuchi (right), formerly of Tacoma, Washington, and Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Wyoming; and Michiye Fujimoto (left), formerly of Del Rey, California, and Gila River Relocation Center, Arizona (in hospital uniform). In their cadet street uniforms are Tomi Kawakami, formerly of Minidoka and Auburn, California, and Fumi, Matsumoto, formerly of Gila River and Pleasanton, California. Two other Nisei girls are in training at St. Mary's Hospital, Kansas City, and one at Bethany Hospital in Kansas City, Kansas.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/1/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-756

Riyeko Kikuchi, formerly of Tacoma, Washington, and Heart Mountain, makes intravenous fluid in the course of her training as a cadet nurse at the Kansas City General Hospital, Missouri. Miss Kikuchi, one of five Nisei girls in the Cadet Nurse Training Corps at the General Hospital, has made straight A's in her academic courses at the University of Kansas.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/1/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-757

Michiye Fujimoto, formerly of Del Rey, California, and Gila River Center, removes linens from the sterilizer at the Kansas City General Hospital where she is training as a nurse. Miss Fujimoto and four other Nisei girls are in the Cadet Nurse Training Corps at the General Hospital, two other Nisei girls are also in training at St. Mary's Hospital, Kansas City, and one at Bethany Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/1/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-758

Toshiko Ryozaki, formerly of Los Angeles, California, and the Granada Center, types from the dictaphone in the office of the United Jewish Social Services, Kansas City, Missouri. Miss Ryozaki, who has been employed as a typist for four months, is one of two Nisei girls doing office work for the United Jewish Social Services.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/1/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-759

Mary Murata, formerly of Marysville, California, and the Granada Center, discusses a mimeographing job with her supervisor in the office of the United Jewish Social Services, Kansas City, Missouri. Miss Murata and one other Nisei girl are employed in the office.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/1/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-760

Miss Tee Mikami, formerly of Los Angeles and the Colorado River Center, discusses plans for a party menu with an associate at the YWCA, Kansas City, Missouri. Miss Mikami, a graduate of Pomona College, has been war services secretary for the YWCA since she left Poston in January, 1944. As a YWCA secretary, Miss Mikami supervises the Snack Bar, an attractive lunch room where civilian workers may drop in for a food snack; Jive Town, a recreational class for teen age girls; and the Cosmo Group, a recreational organization composed mainly of Japanese Americans who have resettled in Kansas City.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/2/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-761

Harry Yanaga, formerly of Gardena, California, and the Colorado River Center, with a fellow worker at the International Caterpillar Company where he is employed as a Diesel mechanic. Mr. Yanaga belongs to a family of 13 people, including children and grandparents, who have purchased a house in Kansas City and plan to stay. The shop foreman told WRA that Mr. Yanaga had been very satisfactory during his eight months' employment at International Caterpillar.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/2/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-762

Harry Yanaga, formerly of Gardena, California, and the Colorado River Center, with a fellow worker at the International Caterpillar Company where he is employed as a Diesel mechanic. Mr. Yanaga belongs to a family of 13 people, including children and grandparents, who have purchased a house in Kansas City and plan to stay. The shop foreman told WRA that Mr. Yanaga had been very satisfactory during his eight months' employment at International Caterpillar.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/2/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-763

Frank Kishi, Issei formerly of Los Angeles and Colorado River Center, with a fellow worker at Shelly Motors, Kansas City, Missouri. Mr. Kishi, who owned his own service station in Los Angeles, is employed there as an auto mechanic. When asked why he plans to buy a home in Kansas City, Mr. Kishi said that he and his wife sold their home in Los Angeles and We plan to stay here. People in Kansas City are different--they aren't as snobbish and they kinda like you. His wife, Marguerite, a Nisei, does office work at the Midwest Cold Storage Company. It took us six months to find a nice place to live, Mr. Kishi said, But now we have a real nice apartment. I just bought an old car and spent $100 fixing it up. We sold our other car. You can tell the people in the centers that we're getting along fine.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/2/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-764

Dr. George Nagamoto, Issei, and one of the most prominent orthodontists in the country, teaching at the University of Kansas City Dental College, Missouri. Major Smith was a former student of Dr. Nagamoto at the University of Southern California where Dr. Nagamoto taught graduate classes in orthodontics for practicing dentists from all over the country. In addition to teaching, Dr. Nagamoto had a private practice in Los Angeles prior to evacuation. While at the Granada Relocation Center, Dr. Nagamoto organized the first dental clinic in the centers and had twenty-five dental students working under him in one wing of the pediatric wing of the hospital. When his son Kenneth, now a private first class at Fort Snelling, decided to study dentistry at the University of Kansas, Dr. Nagamoto came to the Midwest with him and was offered a faculty position by the director of the Kansas City Dental College, also a former student of Dr. Nagamoto. Although Dr. Nagamoto says he prefers the people he knows in the Midwest to those back in California, he has not decided yet where to settle permanently with his family. Except for the fact that there is no opportunity to do graduate teaching in his special field, Dr. Nagamoto says he would stay here. My work is more important to me than anything else, Dr. Nagamoto said, except for good schools for my children. My wife and one child are still at Granada and I'm going to visit them as soon as school is over and decide where to go.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-765

Dr. George Nagamoto, Issei, and one of the most prominent orthodontists in the country, with a friend of his, Major Doyle Smith, both of whom are teaching at the University of Kansas City Dental College, Missouri. Major Smith was a former student of Dr. Nagamoto at the University of Southern California where Dr. Nagamoto taught graduate classes in orthodontics for practicing dentists from all over the country. In addition to teaching, Dr. Nagamoto had a private practice in Los Angeles prior to evacuation. While at the Granada Relocation Center, Dr. Nagamoto organized the first dental clinic in the Centers and had twenty-five dental students working under him in one wing of the pediatric wing of the hospital. When his son Kenneth, now a private first class at Fort Snelling, decided to study dentistry at the University of Kansas, Dr. Nagamoto came to the Midwest with him and was offered a faculty position by the director of the Kansas City Dental College, also a former student of Dr. Nagamoto. Although Dr. Nagamoto says he prefers the people he knows in the Midwest to those back in California, he has not decided yet where to settle permanently with his family. Except for the fact that there is no opportunity to do graduate teaching in his special field, Dr. Nagamoto says he would stay here. My work is more important to me than anything else, Dr. Nagamoto said, except for good schools for my children. My wife and one child are still at Granada and I'm going to visit them as soon as school is over and decide where to go.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-766

This hostel at 2411 Independence Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri, was formerly the parsonage of the Independence Avenue Methodist Church which is next door. The Resettlement Committee of Kansas City expects to redecorate the spacious house and have it ready for occupancy by the first of April. It will afford temporary housing and meals for evacuees wishing to resettle in Kansas City.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-767

Harry S. Oshimo, an Issei resident of Kansas City for ten years, in his gift shop on Petticoat Lane in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. Mr. Oshimo employs four Caucasian clerks. His busy shop is well-stocked with glassware, jewelry, figurines, pictures, and many other commodities in the gift line. Mr. Oshimo has two sons in the Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-768

Harry S. Oshimo, an Issei resident of Kansas City for ten years, in his gift shop on Petticoat Lane in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. Mr. Oshimo employs four Caucasian clerks. His busy shop is well-stocked with glassware, jewelry, figurines, pictures, and many other commodities in the gift line. Mr. Oshimo has two sons in the Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-769

Tomiki Noda, a paroled alien, and his wife are employed in the home of an outstanding physician in Kansas City, Missouri. When this picture was made, Mr. Noda said to tell the people at the centers that I'm as free as a bird. The Nodas' son, Kay, will graduate from the University of Kansas City this June as a sociologist. Formerly of Hanford, California, the Noda family were evacuated to the Jerome Center. They came to Kansas City when plans were made to close Jerome. They have a small apartment in their sponsor's home. Recently when Mrs. Noda needed an expensive operation, their physician-employer made all the arrangements and paid their hospital bills.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-770

Dr. John Shimokawa, who graduated from the Kansas City Dental College in the spring of 1944, has recently started a private practice as an assistant to a Caucasian dentist in the heart of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. Dr. Shimokawa teaches at the Dental College in the daytime and takes care of the Caucasian dentist's night appointments. Born in Hawaii, Dr. Shimokawa was a student at the University of Southern California at the time of evacuation. I enjoyed my six months at Santa Anita and six months at Granada, Dr. Shimokawa said, because I got a year off from studies. His brother is a practicing M.D. in Hawaii where the rest of Dr. Shimokawa's family live. His patient is Shizuko Yanaga, one of 270 resettlers in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-771

Dr. John Shimokawa, who graduated from the Kansas City Dental College in the spring of 1944, has recently started a private practice as an assistant to a Caucasian dentist in the heart of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. Dr. Shimokawa teaches at the Dental College in the daytime and takes care of the Caucasian dentist's night appointments. Born in Hawaii, Dr. Shimokawa was a student at the University of Southern California at the time of evacuation. I enjoyed my six months at Santa Anita and six months at Granada, Dr. Shimokawa said, because I got a year off from studies. His brother is a practicing M.D. in Hawaii where the rest of Dr. Shimokawa's family live. His patient is Shizuko Yanaga, one of 270 resettlers in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-772

Although George Matoi is over 60 years of age, the night foreman at Downey Box Company says he hates to see George leave. Mr. Matoi started as a maintenance man a few months ago, and now has one of the highest paid unskilled jobs in the plant feeding a label printer. Matoi, formerly of San Francisco, will return shortly to the Topaz Center where his wife is sick in the hospital. Mr. Matoi came to Kansas City to be with his son who has recently opened offices here as a practicing optometrist.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-773

Although George Matoi is over 60 years of age, the night foreman at Downey Box Company says he hates to see George leave. Mr. Matoi started as a maintenance man a few months ago, and now has one of the highest paid unskilled jobs in the plant feeding a label printer. Matoi, formerly of San Francisco, will return shortly to the Topaz Center where his wife is sick in the hospital. Mr. Matoi came to Kansas City to be with his son who has recently opened offices here as a practicing optometrist.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/3/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-774

More than 40 Nisei girls have used the National Training School for Christian girls in Kansas City, Missouri, for temporary housing. The school for church workers has accommodations for 100 students, but only 40 students are enrolled at the present time, among whom are three Nisei girls. They are Yuri Shimokoshi (right), formerly of Los Angeles and Heart Mountain; Miriko Nagahama (middle), formerly of Glendale, California, and the Manzanar Center; and Toshiko Nagamori (left), formerly of Hollywood, California and Heart Mountain. Fuji Kobayashi, of Los Angeles, California, and the Colorado River Center, is secretary to the president of the National Training School. Miss Shimokoshi's parents have resettled in Cleveland; Miss Nagahama hopes her parents will come to Kansas City. Miss Nagamori's family has returned to Los Angeles. As part of their four-year training, the girls visit small towns nearby to assist with church services. Following their examinations, the girls will be eligible for the rank of deacon.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/2/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-775

At the busy intersection of Troost and 47th Streets in Kansas City, Missouri, Dr. Roger Matoi has recently opened offices of the Paramount Optical Company in partnership with a Caucasian friend. Dr. Matoi, a graduate of the University of California, was practicing optometry in Oakland, California, at the time of evacuation. He received his Missouri state license in April 1944 and is employed by an optical concern in the daytime. At his private offices which are open from 6 to 9 in the evening, Dr. Matoi makes eye examinations and writes the prescriptions, while his Caucasian partner grinds the lenses and fits the glasses. The offices have only been opened a few months, and February was the best month thus far. The two partners said that if they can double their February business, and they fully expect to, the investment will be worthwhile.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/2/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-776

More than 40 Nisei girls have used the National Training School for Christian girls in Kansas City, Missouri for temporary housing. The school for church workers has accommodations for 100 students, but only 40 students are enrolled at the present time, among whom are three Nisei girls. They are Yuri Shimokoshi (front), formerly of Los Angeles and Heart Mountain; Miriko Nagahama (left), formerly of Hollywood, California, and the Heart Mountain Center. Fumi Kobayashi (right), of Los Angeles, California, and the Colorado River Center, is secretary to the president of the National Training School. Miss Shimokoshi's parents have resettled in Cleveland; Miss Nagahama hopes her parents will come to Kansas City; Miss Nagamori's family has returned to Los Angeles. As part of their four-year training, the girls visit small towns nearby to assist with church services. Following their examinations, the girls will be eligible for the rank of deacon.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/2/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-777

We're all set to go again, state Clarence Kimura and Kiyoshi Miya as they pose on their 170-acre farm in Birmingham, a suburb about 9 miles northeast of Kansas City, Missouri. Almost the entire farm is level bottom land on which they plan to grow most cabbages and some tomato and other vegetable crops. Clarence and his wife, Hazel, are formerly of Woodland, California, and relocated from the Granada, Colorado, center in March, 1944. Kiyoshi's hometown is Hanford, California, and he joined Clarence from the Jerome, Arkansas center in June 1944. Both men are graduates of the University of California College of Agriculture at Davis. In 1944, they operated a small acreage near Liberty, Missouri, raising tomatoes, cabbage, and beans on a semi-experimental basis while learning the characteristics of local soil, climate, etc. They will be ready to begin operations in a few days and other relocatees will be working on their farm this season. During winter, they secured temporary employment in essential industries, securing their housing through the War Housing Center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-778

Ihei Hatanaka and Paul Koga, Isseis relocated in Kansas City, Missouri, are shown in front of the plant where they are employed--a firm manufacturing corrugated containers. Mr. Hatanaka is formerly of Redondo Beach, California, and relocated from the Poston, Arizona, Center with his wife and three small children in October 1944. Mr. Koga and his wife, May, are from Gardena, also relocating from Poston, Arizona, arriving in Kansas City in May 1944 to join other members of their family already relocated. The wives of the two men are sisters. Mrs. Koga, an expert seamstress, has a business of her own--taking orders for dressmaking. The Hatanaka children have been well accepted in a local grammar school and both families hope to make Kansas City their permanent home.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/4/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-779

Seated at the dining table among Caucasian students and faculty members of the National Training School for Christian girls in Kansas City, Missouri, are three Nisei students. They are, left to right, Toshiko Nagamori, formerly of Hollywood, California, and Heart Mountain; Yuriko Shimakoshi, formerly of Los Angeles and Heart Mountain; and Miriko Nagahama, formerly of Glendale, California, and Manzanar. Another Nisei girl is employed in the school office. The president, Rev. Cloyd V. Gustavson, has welcomed evacuee girls to stay with them either over night or for longer periods of time. Room and board amid pleasant surrounding is provided at cost. Over 40 girls have taken advantage of this housing accommodation and additional newcomers will be welcome to stay here. A family of five evacuees is at present renting one of the faculty apartments.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/4/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-780

For more than a half year, resettlers and Caucasians have been meeting twice monthly for a Cosmo Nite at the YWCA in Kansas City, Missouri. Sponsored by Miss Tee Mikami, YWCA War Service Secretary, Cosmo Nite has been a popular source of entertainment for a mixed crowd of approximately 90 persons. Movies, ping-pong, bridge, singing, dancing, skating, and even book reviews and just plain talking have been among the Cosmo Group's activities.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/4/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-781

This social has been dubbed COSMO NITE. For over half a year, evacuees and Caucasians have been meeting twice monthly for a Cosmo Nite at the YWCA in Kansas City, Missouri. Sponsored by the Y and fostered by Miss Tee Mikami, employed there as YWCA War Service Secretary, Cosmo Nite has been a popular source of entertainment for a mixed crowd of approximately 90 persons. Here, they have just seen some movies and are about to engage in other activities typical of Cosmo Nite, such as ping-pong, bridge, singing, dancing and refreshments--or just plain talking. On special programs, there has been skating and even book reviews.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/4/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-782

For more than a half year, resettlers and Caucasians have been meeting twice monthly at the YWCA in Kansas City, Missouri for a social evening called Cosmo Nite. Sponsored by Miss Tee Mikami, YWCA War Service Secretary, Cosmo Nite has been a a popular source of entertainment for a mixed crowd of approximately 90 persons. Movies, ping-pong, bridge, singing, dancing--or just plain talking-- among the Cosmo Group's activities. Special programs have featured skating and even book reviews.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/4/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-783

This social has been dubbed COSMO NITE. For over half a year, evacuees and Caucasians have been meeting twice monthly for a Cosmo Nite at the YWCA in Kansas City, Missouri. Sponsored by the Y and fostered by Miss Tee Mikami, employed there as YWCA War Service Secretary, Cosmo Nite has been a popular source of entertainment for a mixed crowd of approximately 90 persons. Here, they have just seen some movies and are about to engage in other activities typical of Cosmo Nite, such as ping-pong, bridge, singing, dancing and refreshments--or just plain talking. On special programs, there has been skating and even book reviews.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/4/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-784

Captain Carl Hirota, formerly of San Francisco and Topaz, was among the visitors at the semi-monthly Cosmo Nite at the YWCA in Kansas City, Missouri. Captain Hirota, dental officer for an engineering battalion stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas, practiced dentistry for 8-1/2 years in San Francisco prior to evacuation. Chairman of the Topaz Center Council, Captain Hirota volunteered in the Army the day after Secretary of War Stimson's announcement that Japanese-Americans were eligible for military service. While in military service, Captain Hirota has seen most of the United States but still prefers California. He hopes to go back there after his tour of duty with the Army and enter private dental practice again. I have served entirely with Caucasians and have never experienced any discrimination north or south of the Mason-Dixon line, Captain Hirota said. If we prove ourselves loyal during the war and good citizens after the war in civilian jobs, I think the hatred on the West Coast will fade away, he said.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/4/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-785

For more than a half year, resettlers and Caucasians have been meeting twice monthly at the YWCA in Kansas City, Missouri, for a social evening called Cosmo Nite. Sponsored by Miss Tee Mikami, YWCA War Service Secretary, Cosmo Nite has been a popular source of entertainment for an average mixed crowd of ninety persons. Movies, ping-pong, bridge, singing, dancing--or just plain talking--are among the Cosmo Group's activities. Special programs feature skating, book reviews, etc.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kansas City, Missouri. 3/4/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-786

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Ohashi, with their three-week-old baby, Katherine, rent a modern two-bedroom bungalow near the most exclusive residential section in St. Louis, Missouri. The Ohashis found this little house indirectly through friends after having been in St. Louis a year. They rent the house furnished by the owner for $50 per month. The Okashis were married at Rohwer Center. Ted is a graduate of the University of California and is now employed as a director of the aquatic activities at the St. Louis YMCA.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/6/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-787

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Ohashi, with their three-week-old baby, Katherine, rent a modern two-bedroom bungalow near the most exclusive residential section in St. Louis, Missouri. The Ohashis found this little house indirectly through friends after having been in St. Louis a year. They rent the house furnished by the owner for $50 per month. The Okashis were married at Rohwer Center. Ted is a graduate of the University of California and is now employed as a director of the aquatic activities at the St. Louis YMCA.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/6/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-789

Haru Tanaka, an Issei resident of St. Louis, Missouri, for 30 years, owns a small restaurant in the Negro district. He employs 8 Negro helpers and one Issei resettler cook and a part-time Nisei helper. Mr. and Mrs. Tanaka have three children, all of them sons in military service. One son, Sgt. Chester Tanaka, is overseas and has been wounded twice. The other two sons expect to be sent overseas shortly. The Tanakas are very much interested in having evacuees resettle in St. Louis as they feel that St. Louis affords an opportunity for at least another restaurant business as well as other types of business opportunities.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/6/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-790

Sam Kuwahura, Issei cook, came to St. Louis in October 1944 from the Manzanar Center to help Mr. and Mrs. Haru Tanaka, old residents of St. Louis, with their restaurant. Mr. Kuwahura is now working only part-time because of illness. The Tanakas are glad to employ Issei in their restaurant. Applications may be sent to Haru Tanaka, 2628 Market Street, St. Louis, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/6/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-791

Frank Hayashida, formerly of Fresno, California, and Rohwer Center, owns with his partner, George Teraoka, a modern dry-cleaning establishment, Model Cleaners, located in the heart of downtown St. Louis, Missouri. In addition George manages the YMCA Tailor Shop where Frank and George both worked before purchasing their own business. As the Model Cleaners is a 19-year-old establishment, the two Nisei businessmen had a ready clientele from the beginning. They employ 14 Negro and Caucasian workers and are doing approximately $1,000 worth of business weekly. They recently installed the finest type of dry cleaning machinery of which OPA released three units in St. Louis. Theirs is the only dry-cleaning shop in downtown St. Louis with this new superior equipment. Frank Hayashida says that the Model Cleaners could employ Issei and Nisei pressers and hat-cleaners in the shop. He could also provide some housing as he has a six-room apartment over the shop and is using only one room at the present time. More information can be secured by writing Frank Hayashida, 202 N. 18th Street, St. Louis, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-792

Frank Hayashida, formerly of Fresno, California, and Rohwer Center, owns with his partner, George Teraoka, a modern dry-cleaning establishment, Model Cleaners, located in the heart of downtown St. Louis, Missouri. In addition George manages the YMCA Tailor Shop where Frank and George both worked before purchasing their own business. As the Model Cleaners is a 19-year-old establishment, the two Nisei businessmen had a ready clientele from the beginning. They employ 14 Negro and Caucasian workers and are doing approximately $1,000 worth of business weekly. They recently installed the finest type of dry cleaning machinery of which OPA released three units in St. Louis. Theirs is the only dry-cleaning shop in downtown St. Louis with this new superior equipment. Frank Hayashida says that the Model Cleaners could employ Issei and Nisei pressers and hat-cleaners in the shop. He could also provide some housing as he has a six-room apartment over the shop and is using only one room at the present time. More information can be secured by writing Frank Hayashida, 202 N. 18th Street, St. Louis, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-793

Council House at 5625 Wells Street, St. Louis, Missouri, is a friendly community center, where children play at all hours. The position of maintenance man at $100 per month is open at Council House. A three-room apartment will be available soon in the immediate neighborhood. Children of Japanese descent have been warmly welcomed by the children at Council House.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-794

Kinya Kitamura, formerly of Seattle and Minidoka, came to St. Louis, Missouri, in November, 1943, as a chef in a private home, 3654 Flora Place, where he still lives. Mr. Kitamura, who is 62 years old, has done cooking in private homes most of his life. The wife of his employer says she couldn't get along without him. He does not plan to go back to Seattle and says, I'm glad to be away from the Center. All the people should leave the Centers. I stay in St. Louis. Mr. Kitamura can't understand why other bachelor cooks don't leave the centers and take jobs like his. Cook positions are open in St. Louis in private homes, restaurants, and institutions paying good wages.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-795

Kinya Kitamura, formerly of Seattle and Minidoka, came to St. Louis, Missouri in November, 1943, as a chef in a private home, 3654 Flora Place, where he still lives. Mr. Kitamura, who is 62 years old, has done cooking in private homes most of his life. The wife of his employer says she couldn't get along without him. He does not plan to go back to Seattle and says, I'm glad to be away from the Center. All the people should leave the Centers. I stay in St. Louis. Mr. Kitamura can't understand why other bachelor cooks don't leave the centers and take jobs like his. Cook positions are open in St. Louis in private homes, restaurants, and institutions paying good wages.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-796

Florence Abe, formerly of Tule Lake and Alice Yamaoka, formerly of Poston became a partnership in solving their housing problem. Both girls are secretaries who, tired of living in single rooms, wanted an apartment where they could use all their domestic talents. They managed to secure a cozy two-room apartment, completely furnished, including heat and utilities. The rent is $8.50 per week. Apartments like this one can be rented in St. Louis, particularly if a person uses the energy to make the place more home-like and cheery doing some painting and renovating. Mrs. John Sakai, who lives downstairs in the same building, helped the girls decorate their apartment. Alice says, Our home is exactly the way we want it--peach walls in the living room and green in the kitchen. Our pictures and plants are also arranged to suit our tastes. Some people speak of returning to the West Coast as going home, but I feel that I am already home. Alice and Florence invite you to see their home at 3950 McPherson Street, St. Louis, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-797

Florence Abe, formerly of Tule Lake and Alice Yamaoka, formerly of Poston became a partnership in solving their housing problem. Both girls are secretaries who, tired of living in single rooms, wanted an apartment where they could use all their domestic talents. They managed to secure a cozy two-room apartment, completely furnished, including heat and utilities. The rent is $8.50 per week. Apartments like this one can be rented in St. Louis, particularly if a person uses the energy to make the place more home-like and cheery doing some painting and renovating. Mrs. John Sakai, who lives downstairs in the same building, helped the girls decorate their apartment. Alice says, Our home is exactly the way we want it--peach walls in the living room and green in the kitchen. Our pictures and plants are also arranged to suit our tastes. Some people speak of returning to the West Coast as going home, but I feel that I am already home. Alice and Florence invite you to see their home at 3950 McPherson Street, St. Louis, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-798

Alice Yamaoka, formerly of Poston, Marci Sakai, formerly of Gila River, and Florence Abe, formerly of Tule Lake, in Alice and Florence's apartment in St. Louis, Missouri. Alice and Florence are secretaries who, tired of living in single rooms, wanted an apartment where they could use all their domestic talents. They managed to secure a cozy two-room apartment, completely furnished, including heat and utilities. The rent is $8.50 per week. Apartments like this one can be rented in St. Louis, particularly if a person uses the energy to make the place more home-like and cheery doing some painting and renovating. Mrs. John Sakai, who lives downstairs in the same building, helped the girls decorate their apartment. Alice says, Our home is exactly the way we want it--peach walls in the living room and green in the kitchen. Our pictures and plants are also arranged to suit our tastes. Some people speak of returning to the West Coast as going home, but I feel that I am already home. Alice and Florence invite you to see their home at 3950 McPherson Street, St. Louis, Missouri.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

St. Louis, Missouri. 3/5/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-799

Teruo Mukoyama, an Issei resident of Chicago for 16 years, owns his Trading Company in the Garfield Park section of Chicago. Mr. Mukoyama has several resettled employees in his prosperous gift shop. He is also Chicago correspondent for the Utah Nippo and has written many articles on evacuee problems. Mr. Mukoyama is a member of the Garfield Art Businessmen's Association. Both he and his brother, who is in business on Milwaukee Avenue, consider Chicago a good place to do business.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-800

Mrs. S. Okimoto, formerly of Seattle and Minidoka, operates the Wisteria Tea Room, 212 E. Ohio Street, in Chicago's fashionable Gold Coast neighborhood. She's a pioneer--one of the first to leave a Relocation Center, said S. Nagano, an old Chicago Issei resident, who has helped Mrs. Okimoto finance the restaurant. Chicago is a wonderful place, Mrs. Okimoto says, and I plan to stay here--at least as long as business is as good as it is. The Wisteria Tea Room employs six regular workers and caters to both Caucasians and resettlers. Mrs. Okimoto has a married daughter and a granddaughter.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-801

Denjuro Obayashi, who resettled in Chicago from Poston two years ago, is a chef in Fred's Restaurant, owned by Masakidu Sugita, also a resettler. Mr. and Mrs. Sugita left the Gila River Center in June, 1944, and opened a restaurant a few months later at 1014 Leland Avenue, Chicago.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-802

Thomas Masuda, well-known attorney and former civic leader in Seattle, Washington, is now associated with a Caucasian friend, Oscar M. Nudelman, in a law firm at 134 N. LaSalle Street, Chicago. LaSalle Street is the Wall Street of Chicago.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/11/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-804

Pfc. Noboru Hokame, Hawaiian-born Japanese-American, and his Chicago buddy, Pfc. Charles P. Carroll, spent their convalescent furlough together recently at Carroll's home, 2102 S. Central Park, Chicago 23, Illinois. Hokame, a member of the 100th Battalion which was later merged into the 442nd Combat Team, was wounded in Italy and France and wears the Purple Heart with an oak leaf cluster. Since Hokame could not go home to the Island of Maui on convalescent leave, Carroll invited him to Chicago where the two boys have been warmly welcomed by Carroll's family and friends. Of Hokame's action on the front line, Carroll said, I'd rather fight with just one unit of Japanese-Americans than an entire Army of ordinary soldiers. These boys mean business, and you have a better chance of coming out of a battle intact with them than anybody else I know in the Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/9/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-805

Pfc. Noboru Hokame, Hawaiian-born Japanese-American, and his Chicago buddy, Pfc. Charles P. Carroll, spent their convalescent furlough together recently at Carroll's home, 2102 S. Central Park, Chicago 23, Illinois. Hokame, a member of the 100th Battalion which was later merged into the 442nd Combat Team, was wounded in Italy and France and wears the Purple Heart with an oak leaf cluster. Since Hokame could not go home to the Island of Maui on convalescent leave, Carroll invited him to Chicago where the two boys have been warmly welcomed by Carroll's family and friends. Of Hokame's action on the front line, Carroll said, I'd rather fight with just one unit of Japanese-Americans than an entire Army of ordinary soldiers. These boys mean business, and you have a better chance of coming out of a battle intact with them than anybody else I know in the Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/9/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-806

Emmet Duffy, Assistant State's Attorney, Pfc. Noboru Hokame, Hawaiian-born Japanese-American, and Pfc. Charles P. Carroll visited the WRA offices in their convalescent leave. Hokame was a guest of Carroll's family at their home, 2102 S. Central Park, Chicago 23, Illinois. A member of the 100th Battalion which was later transferred to the 442nd Combat Team, Hokame was wounded in Italy and France and wears the Purple Heart with an oak leaf cluster. Of Hokame's action on the front lines, Carroll said, I'd rather fight with just one unit of Japanese-Americans than an entire Army of ordinary soldiers. These boys mean business, and you have a better chance of coming out of a battle intact with them than anybody else I know in the Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/9/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-808

Dr. Tom T. Watanabe, radiologist, is among the doctors and technicians employed in the largest X-ray laboratories in Chicago. Dr. Watanabe is a graduate of the University of California and came to Chicago from Manzanar Medical School. Several Nisei technicians and medical stenographers are employed in the Central X-ray and Clinical Laboratory, 58 East, Washington Street, Chicago.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-809

The Fujimoto family, resettlers in Chicago from Jerome, have opened a grocery store specializing in Oriental foods at 3321 South Cottage Grove Avenue. Kumasuke and Harold Fujimoto owned a produce business for 15 years in Los Angeles prior to evacuation. A customer, also a resettler, is Shigeru Yamamoto, who is employed in the laundry at the Stevens Hotel. Mr. Yamamoto left the Granada Relocation Center several months ago to work at War Hemp, Wisconsin, but he preferred Chicago.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-811

Dr. Randolph Sakada, optometrist, has adjoining offices with Dr. Koki Kumamoto at 47th and Cottage Grove Avenue. Dr. Sakada was formerly associated with a prominent eye physician in Oakland, California. Dr. Sakada resettled in Chicago from Tule Lake Relocation Center. His patient is Rose Nojiri, formerly of Los Angeles and Manzanar.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-812

One of the finest repair shops in Chicago is owned by an Issei, Kankuro Matsumoto, 14 N. Michigan Ave., who employs resettlers in his work. Mr. and Mrs. Matsumoto have lived in Chicago 25 years, having come here after five years in San Francisco. Mr. Matsumoto specializes in repairing sculpture, painting lamps, and antiques and is so busy that he cannot accept any more orders for work until September 1. The Matsumotos have three sons, one of whom is in France with the Army, and the other two are still in high school.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-813

Taneichi Yamamoto, 57-year-old farmer of Salinas, California, came to Chicago from Poston a year ago and entered a new kind of work. He does the heavier repairing in one of the finest repair shops in Chicago--owned by an old Issei resident, Kankuro Matsumoto, 14 N. Michigan Ave. Mr. Yamamoto has six children, four of them boys, and all four in military service. Prior to evacuation, Mr. Yamamoto was a farmer for 22 years in Salinas.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/11/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-814

Miss Marian Tanabe, formerly of San Diego and Poston; and Sakae Toda, formerly of Topaz and Centerville, California, are among the resettlers in Chicago employed by Matsumoto's art and antique repair shop, 14 N. Michigan Avenue. Miss Tanabe, who lives with older sisters employed in Chicago, has been here a year and a half. This shop is so busy with repair work that it cannot accept additional orders until September 1, according to Kankuro Matsumoto, owner, and Issei resident of Chicago for 25 years.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-815

Mrs. Chiyono Osasa is employed by the St. Anthony's Hospital in the laundry. Her home was, before evacuation, at Port Angeles, Washington. In April 1944 she came to Rockford from the Minidoka Relocation Center. Her son, Thomas Osasa, is with the U. S. Army in Manila and her son-in-law, Bill Doi, is in training at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Mrs. Osasa said, I have found Rockford a friendly city.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-816

Mrs. Chiyono Osasa is employed by the St. Anthony's Hospital in the laundry. Her home was, before evacuation, at Port Angeles, Washington. In April 1944 she came to Rockford from the Minidoka Relocation Center. Her son, Thomas Osasa, is with the U. S. Army in Manila and her son-in-law, Bill Doi, is in training at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Mrs. Osasa said, I have found Rockford a friendly city.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-817

Mr. and Mrs. Sakuichi Sasaki, formerly of Marysville, California, and Granada, came to Rockford in March, 1944. The Sasakis, who are employed as domestics, insisted on taking the photographer to their room which was very large and furnished with modern maple furniture that also included several easy chairs and a davenport. Mrs. Sasaki said, Our employers treat us as if we were members of their family. The work is not difficult and we have time to visit often with our Issei friends.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-818

Mr. and Mrs. Sakuichi Sasaki, formerly of Marysville, California, and Granada, came to Rockford in March, 1944. The Sasakis, who are employed as domestics, insisted on taking the photographer to their room which was very large and furnished with modern maple furniture that also included several easy chairs and a davenport. Mrs. Sasaki said, Our employers treat us as if we were members of their family. The work is not difficult and we have time to visit often with our Issei friends.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-819

Mr. and Mrs. Sakuichi Sasaki, formerly of Marysville, California, and Granada, came to Rockford in March, 1944. The Sasakis, who are employed as domestics, insisted on taking the photographer to their room which was very large and furnished with modern maple furniture that also included several easy chairs and a davenport. Mrs. Sasaki said, Our employers treat us as if we were members of their family. The work is not difficult and we have time to visit often with our Issei friends.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-820

Yazo Ishizaki formerly had his own jewelry and watch repair shop in Sacramento, California. He was evacuated to Tule Lake and relocated from there to Rockford in August 1943. He like Rockford so well after he had been here a few months that he purchased a home within a block from the new West Rockford High School. Mrs. Ishizaki and their sons, Robert, Norman, and David, and their daughter Nancy came with him. Mrs. Rei Miwa, Mrs. Ishizaki's mother, also relocated with them. When asked if he would return to Sacramento, Mr. Ishizaki replied, Don't you know? I sold my house in Sacramento. Then he went on to say, After the expulsion order was lifted, we held a conference and all the members of my household agreed that since we had been made to feel welcome in Rockford that we will continue to make this our home. The children are attending school here and I know they like it. I am satisfied that there are excellent schools here.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-821

Mr. Donell Tekawa and family came to Rockford in October 1943 from the Granada Relocation Center. Mr. and Mrs. Tekawa are employed at the Phoenix Cleaners. In addition, other Japanese Americans include Isamu Arita and Jack Oshita. Mrs. Tekawa's mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. S. Sasaki, have also relocated to Rockford and are employed as domestics.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-822

The shop foreman at Phoenix Cleaners is pleased with the work of his Japanese American employees. When asked if he would appear in the picture, he said, Yes, if you'll promise to send me two more men to press and maybe one woman to do some alterations and other sewing that needs to be done here. No promises were made but he certainly did indicate that Japanese Americans have been well received in his plant. The plant is modern, well lighted and has a working force of fifty people. In the picture are Donell Tekawa, formerly of Granada, Isamu Arita, formerly of Granada.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-823

At the Phoenix Cleaners Isamu Arita works as a presser. Before evacuation he had his own shop in Los Angeles. He relocated from Granada in September 1943. Mr. Arita said, Mrs. Arita and our boys, Paul, Frank, and Tom, are all much happier here in Rockford than they were in the relocation center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Rockford, Illinois. 3/13/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-824

Toshio Furukawa, formerly of Palo Alto, California, and Granada, is employed at the Hatfield Dental Laboratories in Peoria until he can complete his last year of dental training to get his D.D.S. His mother, Mrs. Haru Furukawa, came to Peoria in February, 1944, a few months after her son. Mr. Furukawa said, I like Peoria. It is a nice, progressive city. The people here have treated my mother and me very fine, and while I enjoy the work of a dental technician, I do want to become a dentist as soon as possible.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Peoria, Illinois. 3/14/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-825

Toshio Furukawa, formerly of Palo Alto, California, and Granada, is employed at the Hatfield Dental Laboratories in Peoria until he can complete his last year of dental training to get his D.D.S. His mother, Mrs. Haru Furukawa, came to Peoria in February, 1944, a few months after her son. Mr. Furukawa said, I like Peoria. It is a nice, progressive city. The people here have treated my mother and me very fine, and while I enjoy the work of a dental technician, I do want to become a dentist as soon as possible.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Peoria, Illinois. 3/14/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-826

Paul N. Nakamoto, a maintenance man at the St. Joseph Home, Peoria, Illinois, originally lived in Los Angeles. He came to Peoria in December, from the Manzanar Relocation Center. I am pleased to be living in such a friendly place. The Midwest is certainly different from what I expected. If the Issei that are still in the centers could only see and know how good the Issei that are relocated are getting along, I am sure they would leave the camps soon, Mr. Nakamoto said.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Peoria, Illinois. 3/14/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-827

Hal Takaoka, floral designer, brought his wife and daughter to Peoria in December 1943 from Manzanar. Mr. Takaoka formerly lived in Los Angeles. His daughter started kindergarten last year and this year she is in the first grade. I enjoy my work here as a floral designer, said Mr. Takaoka. This is my first job since coming to the Midwest and I have found working and living here pleasant for myself and my family.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Peoria, Illinois. 3/14/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-828

Dr. Sam Kuramoto, osteopath, formerly had a medical practice in Los Angeles, and came directly to Des Moines, Iowa, where he enrolled at the Still College of Osteopathy, instead of going to a Relocation Center. In November, 1944, he opened medical offices in Webster City, a town of 7,000 about 80 miles from Des Moines. I've been busy from the very first day, Dr. Kuramoto said, and I'm having to work night and day. Most of Dr. Kuramoto's patients are Caucasian, and when the WRA photographer visited him March 17, 1945, he had to wait a long time to take his picture--so many patients were waiting to see Dr. Kuramoto. His office is located at 713 Wilson Avenue, Webster City, Iowa. Dr. Kuramoto and his wife, Ayeko, live at 717 First Street.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Webster City, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-829

Dr. Sam Kuramoto, osteopath, formerly had a medical practice in Los Angeles, and came directly to Des Moines, Iowa, where he enrolled at the Still College of Osteopathy, instead of going to a Relocation Center. In November, 1944, he opened medical offices in Webster City, a town of 7,000 about 80 miles from Des Moines. I've been busy from the very first day, Dr. Kuramoto said, and I'm having to work night and day. Most of Dr. Kuramoto's patients are Caucasian, and when the WRA photographer visited him March 17, 1945, he had to wait a long time to take his picture--so many patients were waiting to see Dr. Kuramoto. His office is located at 713 Wilson Avenue, Webster City, Iowa. Dr. Kuramoto and his wife, Ayeko, live at 717 First Street.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Webster City, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-830

Dr. Sam Kuramoto, osteopath, formerly had a medical practice in Los Angeles, and came directly to Des Moines, Iowa, where he enrolled at the Still College of Osteopathy, instead of going to a Relocation Center. In November, 1944, he opened medical offices in Webster City, a town of 7,000 about 80 miles from Des Moines. I've been busy from the very first day, Dr. Kuramoto said, and I'm having to work night and day. Most of Dr. Kuramoto's patients are Caucasian, and when the WRA photographer visited him March 17, 1945, he had to wait a long time to take his picture--so many patients were waiting to see Dr. Kuramoto. His office is located at 713 Wilson Avenue, Webster City, Iowa. Dr. Kuramoto and his wife, Ayeko, live at 717 First Street.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Webster City, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-831

May Ideta, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kiyoshi Ideta-Minami, formerly of Seattle and the Minidoka Center, at Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa. The Ideta-Minami family chose Des Moines as a place to live because May and their second daughter, Yuki, were enrolled as students at Drake University. The two younger children are attending public schools in Des Moines. May is in her junior year at Drake and is an economics major. One of May's Caucasian friends said, May is very popular on the campus here. A number of Nisei attend Drake University. The business manager of the college told WRA, Take all the pictures you like. They are fine people and good students.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-832

May Ideta, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kiyoshi Ideta-Minami, formerly of Seattle and the Minidoka Center, at Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa. The Ideta-Minami family chose Des Moines as a place to live because May and their second daughter, Yuki, were enrolled as students at Drake University. The two younger children are attending public schools in Des Moines. May is in her junior year at Drake and is an economics major. One of May's Caucasian friends said, May is very popular on the campus here. A number of Nisei attend Drake University. The business manager of the college told WRA, Take all the pictures you like. They are fine people and good students.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-833

The Ideta-Minami family and a neighbor's child around the piano in their new home in Des Moines, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Kiyoshi Ideta (Minami) came to Des Moines because their two older daughters, May and Yuki, enrolled in Drake University. Their former home was in Seattle, Washington, where Mr. Ideta (Minami) had a substantial importing business in fishing tackles. The Ideta-Minami family came to Des Moines a year ago from the Minidoka Relocation Center. They purchased a 12-room house at 2023 W. Grand Avenue, a fine old residential section. They rent rooms to both Caucasian and Japanese Americans, and as a side-line, Mr. Ideta-Minami sells oriental provisions. From left to right: Mitsi Ideta (at piano); May Ideta; Yuki Ideta; Akio Ideta; Henry Ideta (high school student employed part-time in a shoe store); a Caucasian friend of Akio's, Bob Paul; Mrs. Ideta and Mr. Kiyoshi Ideta-Minami

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-834

Mr. Kiyoshi (Ideta) Minami, formerly of Seattle, Washington, and the Minidoka Relocation Center, brought his wife and five children to Des Moines, Iowa, a year ago because a Center is no place for children to grow up. They become spoiled. He purchased a 12-room house in a fine old residential section of Des Moines, 2023 W. Grand Avenue. The two older Ideta girls attend Drake University and the third daughter and two sons are in public schools. The Ideta family rent rooms to Caucasian and Japanese-Americans in their home and they also rent a six-room unfurnished apartment over their garage. Mr. Ideta-Minami said that he would be glad to answer letters of inquiry from Center residents who would like to know more about Iowa. As a side-line, Mr. Ideta-Minami sells oriental provisions.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 52, Section F, WRA no. I-835

Mr. Kiyoshi (Ideta) Minami, formerly of Seattle, Washington, and the Minidoka Relocation Center, brought his wife and five children to Des Moines, Iowa, a year ago because a Center is no place for children to grow up. They become spoiled. He purchased a 12-room house in a fine old residential section of Des Moines, 2023 W. Grand Avenue. The two older Ideta girls attend Drake University and the third daughter and two sons are in public schools. The Ideta family rent rooms to Caucasian and Japanese-Americans in their home and they also rent a six-room unfurnished apartment over their garage. Mr. Ideta-Minami said that he would be glad to answer letters of inquiry from Center residents who would like to know more about Iowa. As a side-line, Mr. Ideta-Minami sells oriental provisions.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-836

Shiro Mori, 56-year-old bachelor, came to Des Moines, Iowa three months ago from the Granada Center to work as a chef in a night club here. Mr. Mori, who formerly lived in Los Angeles, was also at Granada, Tule Lake and the Santa Anita Assembly Center. He has a room in the home of an Issei, Kiyoshi Ideta-Minami, who rents rooms and apartments to both Caucasians and Japanese Americans. Mr. Mori says he like Des Moines very much, but he hopes to visit a number of cities where Japanese Americans have resettled. He likes to travel.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-837

George Yoshida, formerly of Lindsay, California, just brought his wife, two children, and two sisters-in-law to Des Moines, Iowa, from the Gila River Center. Mr. Yoshida, who is employed at a harvester company in Des Moines, is helping unload furniture at the Friends Hostel, 2150 Grand Avenue, where his family are staying until they can find permanent housing. Mr. Ross Wilbur, Director of the Hostel, has set up a furniture pool, whereby resettlers can borrow furniture until they are able to purchase or have their own furniture.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/16/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-838

Asajiro Nishimoto, Issei in charge of the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Department of Jack Love's Modern meat and food market, 35th and Ingersoll, Des Moines, Iowa. Mr. Nishimoto, formerly of Los Angeles and the Jerome Center, came to Des Moines because his son-in-law was in medical school here. His son-in-law has recently opened offices in Marshalltown, Iowa, about 60 miles from Des Moines. Asked if he liked Des Moines, Mr. Nishimoto said, The people are very nice here. I hope to stay.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/16/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-839

Mrs. Verlin Yamamoto, formerly of San Francisco and Gila River Center, buys her Saturday groceries at a modern meat and food market located near her home, 3920-1/2 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/16/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-840

Little Judith Yamamoto went to the grocery store with her mother but was stopped outside by some admiring children. The Verlin Yamamoto family, formerly of San Francisco and Gila River, have resettled in Des Moines, Iowa.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/16/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-841

Harrison Wakida, son of Mrs. Ruth Wakida, formerly of Gila River Center and Selma, California, playing in the children's sand box with the daughter of Ross Wilbur, Director of the Friends Hostel, 2150 Grand Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. Mrs. Wakida is dietician at the Friends Hostel, which is being operated as temporary housing quarters for Japanese Americans. The Hostel has quarters for 25 to 30 persons. There were 27 persons of Japanese descent there March 17, 1945, who were looking for permanent housing in Des Moines.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/17/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-842

Jack Ikemoto, formerly of San Jose, California, and Heart Mountain, arrived with his wife, Susie, and baby, Elaine, at the Friends Hostel in Des Moines, Iowa, on March 16, 1945. They are shown here with Mrs. Elizabeth Wilbur, wife of the Director of the Hostel, and will stay at the Hostel until they can find permanent housing. Mr. Ikemoto chose Des Moines as the best place for his family to live after visiting New Jersey, Philadelphia, and Chicago. He hopes to find employment as an auto mechanic.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 3/16/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-843

Mrs. Kay Korematsu, formerly of Tule Lake and Marysville, California, in front of her house on the $135,000 farm that her husband has leased near Grand Island, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. Hi Korematsu have accommodations for several families in this modern home which has an all-electric kitchen and is nicely furnished. Mr. Korematsu can provide housing for 12 families on his farm. Wages are excellent and for those who stay permanently a bonus will be given on the basis of the profits each year. For single men who can operate a tractor and help irrigate the land, Mr. Korematsu will pay $125 per month plus room and board. Married men will be provided housing, $140 per month and their groceries at wholesale prices. Mr. Korematsu will develop the 800 acres for truck-gardening, and expects to plant several thousand potatoes the first of April, with other crops to follow--tomatoes, beets, carrots, lettuce, etc. His address is Route No. 1, Shelton, Nebraska. A little yellow school house for elementary grades is located near the main farm house; the high school is three miles away, and Mrs. Korematsu furishes transportation to the high school.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Nebraska. 3/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-844

Norman Tanabe, formerly of Topaz and Marysville, California, works on the $135,000 farm leased by Hi Korematsu. Mr. Korematsu has 800 irrigated acres which were formerly planted with corn, but which he hopes to develop for truck gardening crops this spring if enough farm workers are available. The farm has $30,000 worth of equipment. Mr. Korematsu can provide housing for 12 families and schools are located nearby. Wages are $125 per month plus room and board for single men, and a share in the profits if they stay permanently, and $140 for married men plus housing and groceries at wholesale prices. Women and children can also earn money at certain seasons, bunching potatoes, crating spinach, etc., and the compensation is .35 to .50 per hour. Mr. Korematsu's address is Route No. 1, Shelton, Nebraska.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Nebraska. 3/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-845

Peter Omachi, formerly of Tule Lake, Topaz, and Loomis, California, works on the $135,000 farm leased by Hi Korematsu, formerly of Topaz and Oakland, California. Mr. Omachi has a wife and six children living on the Korematsus' farm. The younger children attend a little yellow school house located near the Korematsus' main farm house, and the older children are driven to high school three miles away by Mrs. Korematsu each day. They are well liked in school. Mr. Korematsu needs additional farm workers immediately and for those who stay permanently on the 800-acre irrigated truck gardening farm, Mr. Korematsu will give a bonus at the end of each year based on profits. Single men who are skilled can earn $125 per month plus room and board, and married men will receive $140 per month, housing and groceries at wholesale prices. Mr. Korematsu has $30,000 worth of equipment including tractors, trucks, discs, harrows, etc. Mr. Korematsu's address is Route No. 1, Shelton, Nebraska.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Nebraska. 3/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-846

Norman Tanabe, formerly of Topaz and Marysville, California, Hi Korematsu, formerly of Topaz and Oakland, California, and Peter Omachi, formerly of Topaz and Loomis, California, in front of the corn produced on the $130,000 farm which Hi Korematsu has leased for truck-gardening this year. Instead of corn, Mr. Korematsu will grow potatoes, tomatoes, beets, lettuce and other garden crops on the 800 irrigated acres this spring. He needs additional workers immediately and can provide housing for 12 families. Schools are located conveniently to the farm and Japanese American children are well-liked. The farm has $30,000 worth of equipment, including tractor, trucks, harrows, discs, etc. Mr. Korematsu has been in farming all his life and did so well on the farm last year that a company is financing him this year in truck-gardening. In addition to providing housing, he will pay $125 per month for single men plus room and board; $140 for married men and groceries at wholesale, and for those who stay permanently, he will give a bonus based on the profits at the end of the year. Mr. Korematsu's address is Route No. 1, Shelton, Nebraska.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Nebraska. 3/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-847

Norman Tanabe, formerly of Topaz and Marysville, California; Hi Korematsu, formerly of topaz and Oakland; and Peter Omachi, formerly of Topaz and Loomis, California, with some of the $30,000 worth of equipment on the farm leased by Mr. Korematsu, Shelton, Nebraska. This $135,000 farm has been used formerly for corn, but Mr. Korematsu plans to plant garden crops on its 800 irrigated acres this spring. He needs workers immediately and can provide housing for 12 families. Mr. Omachi has six children, five of them in schools located conveniently to the farm. In addition to providing housing, Mr. Korematsu will pay a bonus each year based on the profits. Mr. Korematsu has been in farming all his life, is a 1939 graduate of Cornell, and did so well on this farm last year that a company has financed him so he can lease it this year with an option to buy. Address is Hi Korematsu, Routh #1, Shelton, Nebraska. Women and children can also earn money on the farm seasonally. Wages are 35-50 cents per hour for bunching potatoes, crating spinach, etc.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Nebraska. 3/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-848

Norman Tanabe, formerly of Topaz and Marysville, California; Hi Korematsu, formerly of Topaz and Oakland; and Peter Omachi, formerly of Topaz and Loomis, California, with some of the $20,000 worth of equipment on the farm leased by Mr. Korematsu, Shelton, Nebraska. This $135,000 farm has been used formerly for corn, but Mr. Korematsu plans to plant garden crops on its 800 irrigated acres this spring. He needs workers immediately and can provide housing for 12 families. Mr. Omachi has six children, five of them in schools located conveniently to the farm. In addition to providing housing, Mr. Korematsu will pay a bonus each year based on the profits. Mr. Korematsu has been in farming all his life, is a 1939 graduate of Cornell, and did so well on this farm last year that a company has financed him so he can lease it this year with an option to buy. Address is Hi Korematsu, Route No. 1, Shelton, Nebraska. Women and children can also earn money on the farm seasonally. Wages are 35 to 50 cents per hour for bunching potatoes, crating spinach, etc.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Nebraska. 3/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-849

The six children of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Omachi on the $135,000 farm near Grand Island, Nebraska, leased by Hi Korematsu. The children are Albert, Gertrude, and Elaine in front, and the Omachi twins, Jean and Joan, and Esther. All five of the older Omachi children attend schools located conveniently to the Korematsu farm. Instead of corn, Mr. Korematsu plans to plant garden crops on his 800 irrigated acres this spring. He needs workers immediately and can provide housing for 12 families. In addition to providing housing, Mr. Korematsu will pay $125 per month to single men plus board, and $140 per month to married men plus groceries at wholesale prices. To those who stay on permanently, Mr. Korematsu will pay a bonus at the end of each year based on profits. Women and children can also earn money on the farm doing seasonal labor. Wages are 35 to 50 cents per hour for bunching potatoes, crating spinach, etc. Address is Hi Korematsu, Route No. 1, Shelton, Nebraska.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Nebraska. 3/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-850

Fred S. Doi, formerly of Gila River Center and Fresno, California, came to the Omar Farm outside of Omaha, Nebraska, a year and a half ago to learn dairying. He started at $75 per month plus a house for his family and now receives $125 per month and has been promised another raise. He is in charge of 48 cows and all the dairy equipment. He increased the milk production from 40 gallons per day to 110 to 115 gallons per day, and is enthusiastic about dairying and the Midwest. There are lots of good chances for families to go into dairy farming now even if they have had no experience, like me, and you can't fail on a dairy farm, Mr. Doi said. The entire Doi family, including a brother and sister-in-law and her child, are enthusiastic about Omar Farm and their employers who own a chain of flour mills and bakeries throughout the Midwest. The Omar Farm consists of 220 acres and is an experimental enterprise, in addition to supplying milk and poultry products to leading Omaha institutions.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Omaha, Nebraska. 3/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-851

Thomas Nakanishi, born in Honolulu, and formerly of Fowler, California, and Gila River Center, is in charge of the poultry on the 220 acre experimental Omar Farm, located 17 miles from Omaha. Mr. Nakanishi knew nothing about poultry raising 15 months ago when he arrived at the Omar Farm, but he has increased the farm's proceeds from poultry immensely, and has received a license for poultry work. He spends his spare time studying in the poultry field. He sister, Mrs. Kawami, and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Fred S. Doi, can work whenever they feel like it, grading eggs at 40 cents per hour, and performing other jobs connected with poultry.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Omaha, Nebraska. 3/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-852

With the exception of the manager and several part-time helpers, this family operates Omar Farm, a 220-acre experimental dairy and poultry enterprise located 17 miles from Omaha, Nebraska. They are Fred S. Doi, formerly of Gila River Center and Fresno, California; his brother-in-law, Thomas Nakanishi, born in Honolulu, and formerly of Gila River and Fowler, California; and Tom's sister, Mrs. Kenneth Kawami, with her baby, David; and Mrs. Fred Doi with two of her three children, Chieri and Dickie. The oldest Doi child was in school when the photographer visited the Omar Farm. Mrs. Kawami's husband has been in the Army four years, and is now stationed in France. The whole family is enthusiastic about dairy and poultry farming, having known only vineyard farming in California.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Omaha, Nebraska. 3/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-853

Fred S. Doi, formerly of the Gila River Center and Fresno, California; and his brother-in-law, Thomas Nakanishi, formerly of Gila River and Fowler, California, are in charge of dairying and poultry on the 220-acre experimental Omar Farm, located 17 miles from Omaha, Nebraska. With the exception of the manager and several part-time helpers, Mr. Doi and Mr. Nakanishi operate the entire enterprise, and are enthusiastic. Neither one of us knew anything about dairy farming or poultry management until we came here a year and a half ago. On a farm like this you can't fail, Mr. Doi said. Tell the people at the centers that there are lots of good chances now for people who haven't any experience to make good on a dairy farm. We hope to own our own someday. I doubt if we'll ever go back to California. All we knew there was vineyards.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Omaha, Nebraska. 3/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-854

Mr. and Mrs. Tokuichi Takagi, formerly of Heart Mountain Center and Pomona, California, have purchased a 17-1/2-acre truck garden in Council Bluffs, Iowa, after having made good on the small farm last year. They bought the farm in the name of their son, George, who was recently drafted. His wife and two children are living with Mr. and Mrs. Takagi, and the young Mrs. Takagi helps out in the greenhouse when extra labor is needed. The greenhouses which furnish seedlings to most of the Victory Gardens in Omaha and Council Bluffs are still owned by the former owner of the farm, Mr. Arthur Block, who is helping the Takagis to make a success of their enterprise.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 3/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-855

Mr. and Mrs. Tokuichi Takagi, formerly of Heart Mountain Center and Pomona, California, have purchased a 17-1/2-acre truck garden in Council Bluffs, Iowa, after having made good on the small farm last year. They bought the farm in the name of their son, George, who was recently drafted. His wife and two children are living with Mr. and Mrs. Takagi, and the young Mrs. Takagi helps out in the greenhouse when extra labor is needed. The greenhouses which furnish seedlings to most of the Victory Gardens in Omaha and Council Bluffs are still owned by the former owner of the farm, Mr. Arthur Block, who is helping the Takagi's to make a success of their enterprise.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 3/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-856

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Tsuji, formerly of Granada and Los Angeles, shown with their two daughters and Mrs. Leslie Smith, their employer. Mr. Tsuji does landscape gardening on the Smith grounds and is furnished a small house for his wife and youngest child, Grace. The older daughter, Mrs. Margaret Muto, helps with domestic work in the Smith home where she has rooms. One son, Sam, is in the Army, and a second son, Tom, has a reserve status. The lovely Smith home and grounds are located at 2218 North 56th Street, Omaha, Nebraska. Many such opportunities are available in Midwest cities.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Omaha, Nebraska. 3/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-857

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Tsuji, formerly of Granada and Los Angeles, with one of their children, Grace, in front of the Smith estate, 2218 N. 56th Street, Omaha, Nebraska. Mr. Tsuji does the landscape gardening and odd jobs around the Smith grounds while his daughter, Margaret, who has rooms in the Smith home next door helps with domestic work and teaches in the Benson Baptist Sunday School. Her husband, Ruozo Muto, has been employed in an Omaha auto concern for more than a year.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Omaha, Nebraska. 3/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-858

Grace Tsuji, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Tsuji, formerly of the Granada Center and Los Angeles; and Jerry Smith daughter of the Tsuji's employers, in the yard of the Smith estate in Omaha, Nebraska, where Mr. Tsuji is employed as landscape gardener. Mr. Tsuji formerly operated a fruit market in Los Angeles.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Omaha, Nebraska. 3/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-859

A scene in the Chicago Relocation Division of the War Relocation Authority where relocatees are being interviewed for relocation and assistance.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-860

A scene in the Chicago Relocation Division of the War Relocation Authority where relocatees are being interviewed for relocation and assistance.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 3/10/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-861

Presentation of the Distinguished Service Cross was posthumously made to Pfc. Kiyoshi Muranaga at one o'clock Saturday, April 21, 1945, in the high school auditorium. His mother, Mrs. Kikuyo Muranaga received the medal, which was presented by Col. Polk Atkinson of Fort Collins, acting under the Seventh Service Command of Omaha, Nebraska. Muranaga was killed in action last June 26 near Sureveto, Italy, while serving on the crew of a mortar. His action in staying with his gun caused the withdrawal of the enemy crew manning an 88 millimeter. Just before withdrawing, a direct hit from the gun killed Muranaga instantly after the rest of the group manning the mortar had taken positions of comparative safety.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Amache, Colorado. 4/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-862

Presentation of the Distinguished Service Cross was posthumously made to Pfc. Kiyoshi Muranaga at one o'clock Saturday, April 21, 1945, in the high school auditorium. His mother, Mrs. Kikuyo Muranaga, received the medal, which was presented by Col. Polk Atkinson of Fort Collins, acting under the Seventh Service Command of Omaha, Nebraska. Muranaga was killed in action last June 26 near Sureveto, Italy, while serving on the crew of a mortar. His action in staying with his gun caused the withdrawal of the enemy crew manning an 88 millimeter. Just before withdrawing, a direct hit from the gun killed Muranaga instantly after the rest of the group manning the mortar had taken positions of comparative safety.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Amache, Colorado. 4/25/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-864

Gold stars are here being presented by K. Okura, USO representative, to mothers whose sons were killed in action. This presentation was made in the high school auditorium April 21, 1945.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Amache, Colorado. 4/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-865

Gold stars are here being presented by K. Okura, USO representative, to mothers whose sons were killed in action. This presentation was made in the high school auditorium April 21, 1945.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Amache, Colorado. 4/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-866

The program for the war memorial services in honor of Sgt. James S. Karatsu and S/Sgt. Masami Sakamoto, April 21, 1945, held at the high school auditorium and sponsored by the Blue Star Service Club, was opened with the flag raising ceremony by the Boy Scouts of the Amache Center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Amache, Colorado. 4/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-867

S/Sgt. Henry H. Gosho served 16 months in the Burma-India theatre attached to Army Combat Intelligence with General Frank Merrill's Marauders until April, 1945, at which time he returned to the United States and is now convalescing at Fitzsimons General Hospital preparatory to being given a medical discharge. He volunteered for duty at Camp Savage in November, 1942, while living at the Minidoka Center, and volunteered for the Marauders in August, 1943. His was the first unit to be created from Camp Savage which left the United States in June, 1943. He wears the Presidential Citation, Bronze Star, the Pacific Ribbon with 3 campaign stars, the Combat Infantry Badge, and the shoulder patch of Merrill's Marauders. General Merrill said to his Nisei outfit, I don't know how we would get along without you boys. Sgt. Gosho was affectionately nicknamed Horizontal Hank because he hit the ground so much he wore it out. The doctors had declared him to be flat-footed and physically not qualified for combat. Despite these handicaps he wore out 4 pairs of shoes in walking 1030 miles and contracted malaria 7 times in addition to other tropical diseases. Prior to evacuation to Minidoka, his parents operated a drug store in Seattle.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Denver, Colorado. 4/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-868

S/Sgt. Henry H. Gosho served 16 months in the Burma-India theatre attached to Army Combat Intelligence with General Frank Merrill's Marauders until April, 1945, at which time he returned to the United States and is now convalescing at Fitzsimons General Hospital preparatory to being given a medical discharge. He volunteered for duty at Camp Savage in November, 1942, while living at the Minidoka Center, and volunteered for the Marauders in August, 1943. His was the first unit to be created from Camp Savage which left the United States in June, 1943. He wears the Presidential Citation, Bronze Star, the Pacific Ribbon with 3 campaign stars, the Combat Infantry Badge, and the shoulder patch of Merrill's Marauders. General Merrill said to his Nisei outfit, I don't know how we would get along without you boys. Sgt. Gosho was affectionately nicknamed Horizontal Hank because he hit the ground so much he wore it out. The doctors had declared him to be flat-footed and physically not qualified for combat. Despite these handicaps he wore out 4 pairs of shoes in walking 1030 miles and contracted malaria 7 times in addition to other tropical diseases. Prior to evacuation to Minidoka, his parents operated a drug store in Seattle.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Denver, Colorado. 4/25/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-869

S/Sgt. Henry H. Gosho, left, and Pfc. James Yura, right, are seen looking over War Relocation Authority photographs of some of their comrades. Sgt. Gosho served 16 months in the Burma-India theatre attached to Army Combat Intelligence with General Frank Merrill's Marauders until April, 1945, at which time he returned to the United States and is now convalescing at Fitzsimons General Hospital preparatory to being given a medical discharge. He wears the Presidential Citation, Bronze Star, the Pacific Ribbon with 3 campaign stars, the Combat Infantry Badge, and the shoulder patch of Merrill's Marauders. He was nicknamed Horizontal Hank because of his ability to hit the ground fast when a shell came his way. Although declared by doctors to be flat-footed and not qualified physically for combat, he walked 1030 miles and contracted malaria 7 times in addition to other tropical diseases. Prior to evacuation to Minidoka, his parents operated a drug store in Seattle. Pvt. Yura joined the 442nd Combat Team, an all Japanese-American outfit, just north of Rome and fought north through Italy with it assigned to a machine-gun section. In the Vosges Forest in France he participated in the rescue of the Lost Battalion, the 141st Regiment from Texas. He was wounded in Southern France, November 6, 1945, and was hospitalized two months in England before being returned to the United States. His mother, Mrs. Mikiyo Yura, and two sisters, Mrs. George Kaneko and Mrs. Everett Itanaga, live in Denver. He volunteered from Poston, May 1943, and wears the Purple Heart and a Presidential Citation. His home before evacuation was Bakersfield, California.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Denver, Colorado. 4/28/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-870

Mrs. Nisaku Araki, mother of Toru Araki, transplants some of the plants in her son's greenhouse in Seattle. Another son, Minoru Araki, is with the Army in France. The Araki family was formerly of Hunt, Idaho.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-871

Toru Araki, formerly of Hunt, Idaho, is mending the roof of his greenhouses in Seattle. Toru is a University of Washington graduate, who with his wife and two small daughters have recently relocated in their home at 839 Elmgrove Avenue in Seattle. A brother, Minoru Araki, is with the army in France.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-872

Mr. and Mrs. Toru Araki and their daughters, Susan and Louise, and Toru's father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Nisaku Araki, in front of their Seattle home. Toru is a University of Washington graduate, who with his wife and children have recently relocated from Minidoka to their home at 839 Elmgrove Avenue in Seattle. A brother, Minoru Araki, is with the army in France.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-873

Mrs. Toru Araki is busy with the family laundry. Mr. Araki is a University of Washington graduate, who with his wife and two small daughters have recently relocated in their home at 839 Elmgrove Avenue in Seattle. A brother, Minoru Araki, is with the army in France.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-874

Toru Araki and his two daughters, Susan and Louise, have their pictures taken with their puppy, Dule, and a Caucasian neighbor playmate. The little girl, Joan, is a frequent visitor from her home next door, and the Araki children were invited to a birthday party at her home within a week after their return from Minidoka. Toru is a University of Washington graduate, who with his wife and two small daughters have recently relocated in their home at 839 Elmgrove Avenue in Seattle. A brother, Minoru Araki, is with the army in France.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-875

Toru Araki, formerly of Hunt, Idaho, is here shown with tomato and celery plants which were grown in one of his greenhouses. These will be transplanted in a field. Toru is a University of Washington graduate, who with his wife and two small daughters have recently relocated in their home at 839 Elmgrove Avenue in Seattle. A brother, Minoru Araki, is with the army in France.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-876

Mrs. Emon Ikuda, formerly of Heart Mountain, prepares a family meal on her own stove for the first time since evacuation. Mr. and Mrs. Emon Ikuda and their son Mitsuo were White River Valley's first returnees.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kent, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-877

Mrs. Emon Ikuda has plenty of household tasks to keep her busy now since her return to their home near Kent, Washington ... gone are the leisure hours of the relocation center at Heart Mountain. Mr. and Mrs. Emon Ikuda and their son, Mitsuo, were White River Valley's first returnees.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kent, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-878

White River Valley's first returnees are Mr. and Mrs. Emon Ikuda and their son Mitsuo, from Heart Mountain. They are shown by the garden pool in the front yard of their home near Kent, Washington. Mitsuo missed out on the pictures because he was in town doing the family shopping.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kent, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-879

Mr. Emon Ikuda proudly displays some of his rhubarb crop grown on his farm near Kent, Washington. Mr. and Mrs. Emon Ikuda and their son Mitsuo, were White River Valley's first returnees.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kent, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-880

The Eleanor Apartments which consists of thirty-two units, of which twenty-two are rented to Caucasian defense workers, are owned by Mr. and Mrs. Kato, formerly from Minidoka. Standing left to right in front of the apartment house are, Mr. D. Kasakabi and three-year-old son Paul; Mr. and Mrs. Kato; Mrs. Jeannette Otsuka; and Mrs. Kasakabi, recently relocated in Seattle from Minidoka. The Katos' son Haruo was recently awarded the Purple Heart for wounds received in France with the 442nd Combat Battalion. One daughter is working for the U.S. Treasury Procurement Office in Seattle, and another is working for the American Friends Service Committee in Seattle.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-881

Mr. and Mrs. Seinosuke Nishimura of Seattle inside one of their greenhouses typing tomato plants. Mr. Nishimura had a few problems when he returned to Seattle, involving legal difficulties of persuading tenants to leave, but he reports that everything has been settled and things are working out fine now. He reports that the Caucasian neighbors have been very friendly and helpful since his return to the city with his family.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/12/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-882

Frank Kubota, a returned veteran, at work in the machine shop of the Ravenna Metal Products company in Seattle. Kubota secured his job through the veterans placement bureau, and was recently initiated into Local 79, International Association of Machinists, A.F.L.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/12/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-883

Frank Kubota, a returned veteran, at work in the machine shop of the Ravenna Metal Products company in Seattle. Kubota secured his job through the veterans placement bureau, and was recently initiated into Local 79, International Association of Machinists, A.F.L.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/12/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-884

This picture taken in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sasaki of 313 18th Avenue in Seattle, Washington, are of former Minidoka residents. They are, left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Sasaki, Rev. Hirikawa Kihachi, and Mrs. Dorrie Abe. Mrs. Abe is hoping her husband George will return soon from the European Theatre of War where he has been serving with the army. Mr. and Mrs. Sasaki have one son in France and another who recently received a medical discharge, and who is living with them in Seattle.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-885

Mr. and Mrs. Sasaki (former Minidoka residents) in their home at 313 Eighteenth Avenue in Seattle, Washington. They have one son in France and another who recently received a medical discharge, and who is living with them in Seattle.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/13/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-886

Mrs. Z. Maekawa, formerly of Tule Lake, transplanting celery in the Rainier Valley near Seattle, Washington. During the past two years Mr. and Mrs. Maekawa have been farming at Emmett, Idaho, but are now back at home with their daughter, Mrs. M. Noji. Mr. Noji operates an extensive greenhouse property now specializing in tomatoes and vegetable plants for commercial gardens.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/14/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-887

Mrs. Z. Maekawa, formerly of Tule Lake, transplanting celery in the Rainier Valley near Seattle, Washington. During the past two years Mr. and Mrs. Maekawa have been farming at Emmett, Idaho, but are now back at home with their daughter, Mrs. M. Noji. Mr. Noji operates an extensive greenhouse property now specializing in tomatoes and vegetable plants for commercial gardens.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/14/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-888

Mrs. M. Noji, whose husband operates an extensive greenhouse property now specializing in tomatoes and vegetable plants for commercial gardens, is seen with their daughter Arlene in one of the greenhouses in the Rainier Valley near Seattle, Washington. Mrs. Noji's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Z. Maekawa, from Tule Lake, are assisting them.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/14/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-889

Mrs. M. Noji in one of the rapidly developing tomato houses in the Rainier Valley near Seattle, Washington. Her husband operates an extensive greenhouse property now specializing in tomatoes and vegetable plants for commercial gardens. During the past two years the Nojis have been engaged in similar operations near Spokane, in Eastern Washington, and at Emmett, Idaho. Most of their friends are at the Minidoka Center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Seattle, Washington. 5/14/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-890

Billie, Rosie and Takeshi Sakaguchi, formerly from Minidoka, find no time for idle moments on the 10-acre vegetable and fruit farm near Bellevue, Washington. Both Taki Sakaguchi, husband of Billie, and his brother, Takeshi, shown above, are employed full time on their own and neighboring farms.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Bellevue, Washington. 5/17/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-891

Steven Sakaguchi, left, and Sharon Sakaguchi, cousins, enjoy life in Bellevue farm home of their parents, the Taki and the Takeshi Sakaguchis, who owns a 10-acre fruit and vegetable farm. The two brothers find no time for idle moments because they are employed full time on their own and neighboring farms.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Bellevue, Washington. 5/17/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-892

Billie, Rosie and Takeshi Sakaguchi (Minidoka) find no time for idle moments on their 10-acre vegetable and fruit farm near Bellevue, Washington. Both Taki Sakaguchi, husband of Billie, and his brother, Takeshi, shown above, are employed full time on their own and neighboring farms. Cauliflower is one of the extensive commercial crops on the Sakaguchi farm. The straight rows of young plants here shown is one indication of good growers.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Bellevue, Washington. 5/17/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-893

K. Funai was the first old timer to return to his farm near Woodenville, Washington. He was at the Minidoka center prior to his return. Here he is viewing a prospective crop of lettuce. While waiting for his land to condition for planting, Mr. Funai works hard to beautify the home grounds, and from the five service stars hanging in his window he works pretty much alone at present.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Woodenville, Washington. 5/15/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-894

Pfc. Kiyoshi Yabuki, a wounded veteran home from Italy and France with a Purple Heart to his credit, is glad to be once again with his mother. The best Christmas gift she can recall was a telegram that Kiyoshi Yabuki returned to the United States last Christmas Day. His brother Terumatsu also returned to his greenhouse property, making the family complete once again.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Bellevue, Washington. 5/17/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-895

With the return of Terumatsu Yabuki to his greenhouse property at Hunt's Point near Bellevue, Washington on May 17, 1945, from Minidoka, the Yabuki family is again reunited on the home place. Left to right, Terumatsu Yabuki, Mother Yabuki, Pfc. Kiyoshi Yabuki and Hideo Yabuki. Kiyoshi, a veteran, returned to the United States last Christmas Day from Italy and France.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Bellevue, Washington. 5/17/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-896

Mr. T. Seto, formerly of Minidoka, works on some of the plants he cared for as head gardener of the Tacoma General Hospital. He is a member of the board of directors of the Japanese Methodist Church and wants evacuees to know that a hostel in Tacoma is ready for guests. It will house 10 men and is located in the Japanese Methodist parsonage at 19th and Fawcett Avenue. Four of his sons are in the army and he has one daughter of school age, who with her mother will soon join him.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Tacoma, Washington. 5/15/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-897

T. Kay Horike, formerly of Minidoka, now a Senior at the College of Puget Sound, takes time out from his classes to talk with some of his friends. Left to right, Le Roy Vaughn, president of the student body; Marian Tergoning, freshman student; Kay Horike; Helen Pat Beem, Senior, and Bob McCullough, Junior. Horike has a wife and two children at Minidoka, and is busy trying to find housing so they can join him. At present he is living in the men's dormitory on campus.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Tacoma, Washington. 5/15/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-898

Mr. and Mrs. George Yoshihara, formerly of Granada, have returned to the oyster beds and home near Shelton, Washington. They stayed with Caucasian neighbors when they first returned, until they could get moved back into their own home.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Washington. 5/15/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-899

Mr. George Yoshihara, formerly of Granada, is shown on the oyster shell dump outside of his packing plant. The Yoshiharas stayed with Caucasian neighbors when they first returned to their home and oyster beds near Shelton, Washington, until they could get moved back into their own home.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Washington. 5/15/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-900

Mr. George Yoshihara, formerly of Granada, is shown on the oyster float in front of his oyster beds. The Yoshiharas stayed with Caucasian neighbors when they first returned to their home near Shelton, Washington, until they could get moved back into their own home.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Shelton, Washington. 5/15/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-901

Brother and sister, Meddy Shigeo Itami, are shown in their greenhouse at 67th and Holgate, Portland, Oregon. The Sukemon Itami family relocated before Easter from Heart Mountain and have been kept busy since their return trying to grow enough flowers to supply their retail and wholesale trade. Three of Mr. Itami's sons and a son-in-law have been in the service, one recently receiving a medical discharge. The two Itami boys who are overseas met in France and wrote home that they were able to get together for a good chinfest on family news. Neither son knew the other was in the vicinity. Caucasian neighbors have been very friendly since the Itamis returned, and while this picture was being taken, the woman stopped to ask for the addresses of the boys over seas. Mr. Itami reports that many sailors, sons of neighbors, have stopped to inquire about his sons so that they may write to them.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Portland, Oregon. 5/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-903

The Sukemon Itami family, formerly from Heart Mountain, is shown in front of their Portland home. Left to right: Mr. Itami; Ruth Niiya, a daughter and mother of 19-months-old Victor shown in the picture, and of 17-day-old Terry, who holds the distinction of being the first baby of Japanese ancestry to be born in Portland since the evacuation; Fumi, Meddy, and in the front row, Victor and Frank. The two Itami boys who are over seas met in France and wrote home that they were able to get together for a good chinfest on family news. Neither son knew the other was in the vicinity.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Portland, Oregon. 5/19/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-904

Miss Violet McCurtey, nursery school director, and Rose Niguma, swing shift nursery school teacher at University Homes Housing Project in Portland, are shown with some of the younger children who attend the nursery school while their parents work in defense plants. Miss Niguma has two brothers in service overseas, and is awaiting the arrival of her mother from Minidoka. Miss Niguma lives at 3931 Bataan Street in the project.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Portland, Oregon. 5/18/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-905

Rose Niguma, nursery school teacher in the University Homes Housing Project in Portland, formerly from Minidoka, is shown with one of her Caucasian charges, Stephen, on the play ground of the nursery school. Stephen has a reputation of being a scene stealer and is very photogenic and seems to realize it in spite of being less than two-years-old. Miss Niguma has two brothers in service overseas, and is awaiting the arrival of her mother from Minidoka. She lives at 3931 Bataan Street in the project.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Portland, Oregon. 5/18/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-906

Mr. T. S. Akiyama, formerly from Minidoka, displays some of the asparagus which is ready to be crated in the packing shed. The Akiyamas are marketing their crops through the Apple Growers Association and expect to sell more than 100 crates during the season.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-907

The T. S. Akiyama family of Hood River, Oregon, recently relocated from Minidoka, are shown in their asparagus field. The Akiyamas are marketing their crops through the Apple Growers Association and expect to sell more than 100 crates during the season. Left to right: Nobi; T. S. Akiyama; Henry Akiyama; Kiyo ; and Mrs. Akiyama.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-908

Mrs. T. S. Akiyama, formerly from Minidoka, cuts asparagus to be crated and sold through the Hood River Apple Growers Association. They expect to sell more than 100 crates during the season.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-909

Mrs. Sue Ogawa and her two daughters, Mary and Lois, on the porch of their lovely home in the Hood River Valley. A son, Masao, is in the service, and neighbors have volunteered to help the Ogawas with spraying and thinning. The Ogawas relocated from Tule Lake to Cleveland and returned to their valley home in March, 1945.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-910

Mrs. Sue Ogawa and her two daughters Mary and Lois, are busy cleaning the undergrowth in their 20-acre orchard near Hood River, Oregon. A son, Masao, is in the service, and neighbors have volunteered to help the Ogawas with spraying and thinning. The Ogawas relocated from Tule Lake to Cleveland and returned to their valley home in March, 1945.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-911

Mr. Y. Mishima is shown with his friends and neighbors, the Cereghino brothers, who own and operate a truck farm next to the Mishima berry farm near Gresham, Oregon. The Mishimas voluntarily relocated to Weiser, Idaho, at the time of evacuation and recently returned to their own home to raise loganberries, boysenberries and young berries. S. Cereghino and L. Cereghino have been neighbors for the past 23 years, and are naturalized citizens of Italian ancestry. The two families bought adjoining farms at approximately the same time, and their sons were reared together and attended the Gresham schools. Mishima's son is in New York City at present studying art.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Gresham, Oregon. 5/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-912

Mr. and Mrs. Y. Mishima, are shown with two Caucasian neighbors on the berry ranch near Gresham, Oregon. The Mishimas voluntarily relocated to Weiser, Idaho, at the time of evacuation and recently returned to their own home to raise loganberries, boysenberries and young berries. S. Cereghino and L. Cereghino have been neighbors for the past 23 years, and are naturalized citizens of Italian ancestry. The two families bought adjoining farms at approximately the same time, and their sons were reared together and attended the Gresham schools. Mishima's son is in New York City at present studying art.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Gresham, Oregon. 5/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-913

B. Fujii and his sons Ed, Tom, and Ted (voluntary evacuees to Weiser, Idaho) are shown cultivating their asparagus field on their 140-acre farm near Troutdale, Oregon. The Fujii family has successfully marketed dry onions and other crops in the wholesale market in Portland, and is now marketing asparagus to local retail grocers. Fifteen-year-old Tom is a junior in the Gresham high school. The Fujiis are raising brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, boysenberries, and asparagus this season.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Troutdale, Oregon. 5/18/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-914

Mr. B. Fujii stops cultivating the asparagus field long enough to pose for his picture. The Fujiis voluntarily relocated at the time of evacuation to Weiser, Idaho, and returned to their home early this spring. The Fujii family has successfully marketed dry onions and other crops in the wholesale market in Portland, and is now marketing asparagus to local retail grocers. Fifteen-year-old Tom is a junior in the Gresham high school. The Fujiis are raising brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, boysenberries, and asparagus this season.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Troutdale, Oregon. 5/18/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-915

Mrs. Roy Yamada and her mother, Mrs. B. Fujii, in front of their home near Troutdale, Oregon. Roy Yamada is stationed at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. The Fujiis voluntarily relocated at the time of evacuation to Weiser, Idaho, and returned to their home early this spring. The Fujii family has successfully marketed dry onions and other crops in the wholesale market in Portland, and is now marketing asparagus to local retail grocers. Fifteen-year-old Tom is a junior in the Gresham high school. The Fujiis are raising brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, boysenberries, and asparagus this season.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Troutdale, Oregon. 5/18/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-916

Mr. Asakawa is shown in his rhubarb patch. He has lived in the neighborhood for nearly 30 years, and says his Caucasian neighbors have been fine to the family since its return, and have gone out of their way to help them do their shopping. Formerly residents of Minidoka, the family has been returning in different sections ever since spring.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Gresham, Oregon. 5/20/45

Volume 53, Section F, WRA no. I-917

E. M. Cox and Nogi Asakawa stopped plowing a Caucasian neighbor's field long enough to pose for their pictures. Formerly residents of Hunt, Idaho, the family has been returning in different sections ever since spring, to their farm near Gresham, Oregon. Caucasian neighbors have been fine to the family since its return.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Gresham, Oregon. 5/20/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-918

The Asakawa family is shown on the lawn of their home near Gresham, Oregon. Formerly residents of Hunt, Idaho, the family has been returning in different sections ever since spring. In the picture are, left to right: Mrs. Toyoko Kashia, a daughter; with Roy Kashia, 2; and Janet, 5; Mrs. Asakawa, Walter Asakawa; Mr. Asakawa, and Ben Asakawa. Walter is in the last half of his senior year at Gresham High School. Two other sons, Jack and Nogi, are not shown because Nogi was busy plowing a Caucasian neighbor's field with the assistance of a Caucasian friend, and Jack is in the army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Gresham, Oregon. 5/20/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-919

Mr. S. Asai, formerly from Heart Mountain, is shown pouring water into the radiator of his tractor in preparation for cutting rills in the orchard for irrigation. Mr. Asai has 40 acres in fruit. Two Asai sons are serving overseas and a third is awaiting overseas orders. The other children are attending the Hood River schools.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-920

Mrs. S. Asai is shown cleaning out the irrigation rills in the 40-acre family orchard near Hood River. All 40 acres are in fruit. The Asai family were at the Heart Mountain center. Two of Mrs. Asai's sons are serving overseas and a third is awaiting overseas orders.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-921

Eighteen-year-old Gene Asai is shown with his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. S. Asai, thinning apples on their 40-acre ranch near Hood River, Oregon. Two Asai sons are serving overseas and a third is awaiting overseas orders. Two other children are attending the Hood River schools. The Asais returned to Hood River from the Heart Mountain Center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-922

Eighteen-year-old Gene Asai and his father, Mr. S. Asai, are discussing the problems of fruit raising on their ranch near Hood River, Oregon. Mr. Asai has 40 acres in fruit. Two Asai sons are serving overseas and a third is awaiting overseas orders. Two other children are attending the Hood River schools. The Asais returned to Hood River from the Heart Mountain Center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-923

Mr. S. Asai and George Shitara from Heart Mountain pose on the tractor after cutting rills in the Asai orchard for irrigation. Mr. Asai has 40 acres in fruit. Two of Mr. Asai's sons are serving overseas and a third is awaiting overseas orders, and the other children are attending the Hood River schools.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-924

Twenty-year-old Mika Asai, daughter of S. Asai, formerly of Heart Mountain, is shown weeding part of the family orchard near Hood River, Oregon. Two of her brothers are serving overseas and a third is awaiting overseas orders.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hood River, Oregon. 5/21/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-925

Dr. Blair Stewart, chairman of the steering committee of the Portland Citizens Relocation Committee and Reed College professor of Economics, at a weekly luncheon business meeting at the old Heathman Hotel. The committee, which is made up of thirty prominent Portland civic leaders, is concerned with helping solve housing and employment problems of the Japanese who wish to return to the Portland area. Among those present at this meeting are Dr. Blair Stewart; Mrs. Betty Sales of the National Conference of Christians and Jews; Miss Isabel Gates, Baptist Mission Board; Dr. Nace, president of the Council of Churches, who lived in Japan for 13 years; Gus Solomon, Portland attorney; Fannie Friedman, Relocation Officer of the Portland District W. R. A. area office.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Portland, Oregon. 5/22/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-926

The steering committee of the Portland Citizens Relocation Committee is shown at a weekly luncheon business meeting at the old Heathman Hotel. The committee, which is made up of thirty prominent Portland civic leaders, is concerned with helping solve housing and employment problems of the Japanese who wish to return to the Portland area. Those present at this meeting are Dr. Blair Stewart, chairman, and Reed College professor of Economics; Mrs. Benshadler; Mrs. Betty Sales of the National Conference of Christians and Jews; Miss Isabel Gates, Baptist Mission Board; Dr. Nace, president of the Council of Churches, who lived in Japan for 13 years; Gus Solomon, Portland attorney; Fannie Friedman, Relocation Officer of the Portland District W. R. A. area office; and Florence West, Area Reports Officer from the Seattle W. R. A. area office.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Portland, Oregon. 5/22/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-927

The steering committee of the Portland Citizens Relocation Committee is shown at a weekly luncheon business meeting at the old Heathman Hotel. The committee, which is made up of thirty prominent Portland civic leaders, is concerned with helping solve housing and employment problems of the Japanese who wish to return to the Portland area. Those present at this meeting are Dr. Blair Stewart, chairman, and Reed College professor of Economics; Mrs. Benshadler; Mrs. Betty Sales of the National Conference of Christians and Jews; Miss Isabel Gates, Baptist Mission Board; Dr. Nace, president of the Council of Churches, who lived in Japan for 13 years; Gus Solomon, Portland attorney; Fannie Friedman, Relocation Officer of the Portland District W. R. A. area office; and Florence West, Area Reports Officer from the Seattle W. R. A. area office.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Portland, Oregon. 5/22/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-928

Mrs. K. Sasaki, formerly from Minidoka, poses for her picture with her three children and Miss Alice Finley, hostel director of the recently opened hostel for returnees at 315 N.W. 16th Street, Portland, Oregon. Miss Finley, who lived for 30 years in Kagoshima, Japan, is operating the hostel under the sponsorship of the Portland Methodist Board of Church Extension. The hostel can accommodate 60 people and has housekeeping facilities for families as well as individuals. Mr. and Mrs. Sasaki are leaving Portland within a week to go to Hood River, where they will be employed on the Hamada ranch.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Portland, Oregon. 5/22/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-929

Hideo Yabuki displays the products of his toil since coming back home to Hunt's Point to his brother, Kiyoshi, a Pfc., returned from overseas service with highest honors received in Italy and France, who is now a discharged veteran due to wounds received. Three times a week top quality cukes go to market in Seattle from the Yabuki hothouses and find ready market. Hideo recently returned from Minidoka.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Bellevue, Washington. 5/17/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-930

Amy Watanabe of Denver and Pfc. James Maeda, Fitzsimons General Hospital, Denver, at an annual semi-formal dance sponsored by the Young People's Society of Denver, which was held in the Y.W.C.A. Auditorium. Informal dances are held at the Y.W.C.A. once a week, which is just one of the recreational programs for young relocatees in Denver. Pfc. Maeda is from Hawaii and trained at Camp McCoy, Wisconsin, then was transferred to Camp Shelby, Mississippi, where he completed his training before going overseas and serving with the famed 100th Battalion in Italy for 18 months.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Denver, Colorado. 6/14/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-931

Mitzi Fujino form Denver and formerly from Minidoka, is dancing with Shig Sakamoto from the Topaz and Tule Lake centers, whose home was, prior to evacuation, in Sacramento, California, at an annual semi-formal dance sponsored by the Young People's Society of Denver, which was held in the Y.W.C.A. Auditorium. Informal dances are held at the Y.W.C.A. once a week, which is just one of the recreational programs for young relocatees in Denver.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Denver, Colorado. 6/14/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-932

This picture was taken during intermission at an annual semi-formal dance sponsored by the Young People's Society of Denver, which was held in the Y.W.C.A. Auditorium. Left to right: Mary Masunaga of Brighton, Colorado; George Fujimoto, a returned veteran from Ault, Colorado; Jane Nakayama of Denver; Sgt. Shizuo Sakurada from Limon, Nebraska; Amy Watanabe, Denver; Pfc. James Maeda, Fitzsimons General Hospital, Denver; Kathie Katayama, Brighton, Colorado; and Pvt. George Morita of Kersey, Colorado. Informal dances are held at the Y.W.C.A. once a week, which is just one of the recreational programs for young relocatees in Denver. All the soldiers in this picture have served overseas.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Denver, Colorado. 6/14/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-935

While on his visit of evacuee families in the Fresno District, Mr. Dillon Myer, Director of the War Relocation Authority, called on the Kitahara farm located at Reedley, California. Mr. George Kitahara owns 175 acres of farm in Reedley and Parlier districts composed of grapes, peaches, and plums. Mr. Myer is shown with a group of peach packers on one of Mr. Kitahara's farms: they are left to right: Mr. I. Kitahara, Hisaye Watari, Hisae Yamagata, Hanaye Watari, Mrs. I. Kitahara, Tamae Yamagata, Mrs. S. Watari, Mr. Watari, Kiyoshi Watari, Isaao Yamagata. All of these people returned to Reedley, California, from the Colorado River Relocation Center recently. The Kitaharas' home is located at Rt. 1, Box 18, Parlier, California. Mr. and Mrs. George Kitahara relocated to Gary, Indiana, for two years before returning to their home. Mr. Kitahara was an active leader of the Reedley JACL Chapter prior to evacuation and well known in church activities.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/20/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-936

Mr. Howard Hatayama, formerly from the Gila River Relocation Center, and later Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is shown with Mr. Dillon Myer, Director of the War Relocation Authority, when Mr. Myer paid a visit to Mr. Hatayama's home while he was on a tour visiting evacuee homes in th Fresno District. Shown here, left to right, are: Chas. F. Miller, Relocation Supervisor of the San Francisco Area; R. B. Cozzens, Assistant Director of the Western Office; Howard Hatayama; Leo T. Simmons, Relocation Officer; Dillon Myer, Director. Mr. Hatayama returned to his farm in December, 1944 with his wife, Reiko, his son, Leigh Hubert, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tanakichi Hatayama, and his brother, Narumi, and his family. All were residents of the Gila River Center except his brother and his family. Prior to evacuation, Mr. Hatayama was engaged in farming and was the president of the JACL Chapter of Fresno.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Del Rey, California. 6/20/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-938

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Iwasaki are playing with their friends after their return from the Colorado River Relocation Center, at their home at Rt. 1, Box 384, Reedley, California. Shown left to right, front row: Annie Torosian, a neighbor girl, Amy, and Norman Iwasaki. Back row: Michi Kubota, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Itaru Kubota of Fresno and formerly of the Colorado River Relocation Center, who is spending a few days of her summer vacation visiting the Iwasakis, and Takeo Lawrence Iwasaki. The children say they like being home rather than staying in camp.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-939

Mrs. Charles Iwasaki holding her daughter, Amy, and a neighbor girl, Annie Torosian, on her lap. Mrs. Iwasaki is known to be the first woman Block Manager of the Colorado River Relocation Center, where she and her family resided until their return to their home and farm at Rt. 1, Box 384, Reedley, on March 1. The Iwasaki home was the target of the shooting attacks by Levi Multanen of Parlier, who was convicted and given a 6-months' probation. In spite of the incident which happened on the night of May 22, Mrs. Iwasaki and the other members of the family are glad to be home once again.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-940

Mrs. Charles Iwasaki of Rt. 1, Box 384, Reedley, California, formerly of the Colorado River Relocation Center and its first woman Block Manager, returned to her home with her husband and three children on March 1. She is shown surrounded by her children and their friends. They are front row, left to right, Annie Torosian, a neighbor girl; Takeo Larry Iwasaki; back row, Michi Kubota, Amy Iwasaki, Mrs. Iwasaki, and Norman Iwasaki. The Iwasaki home was one in which Levi Multanen fired several shotgun shots on the night of May 22, for which he was convicted and given 6-months' probation.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-941

Mr. Kiichi Iwasaki is assisting in irrigating the vineyard belonging to his son, Charles K. Iwasaki, located at Rt. 1, Box 384, Reedley, California, to which he returned with his son's family on March 1, from the Colorado River Relocation Center. It was the Iwasaki home in which Levi Multanen fired several shotgun shots for which he was convicted and given a 6-months' probation. In spite of the shooting attack, the family was not frightened and they are very happy to be home again.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-942

Charles K. Iwasaki is irrigating his peach orchard located at Rt. 1, Box 384, Reedley, California, to which he and his family, consisting of his wife, three children, and father, returned from the Colorado River Relocation Center, Unit III, on March 1. Mr. Iwasaki is the owner of a 50-acre farm on which he raises peaches, grapes, and plums. It was the Iwasaki home in which Levi Multanen fired several shotgun shots for which he was convicted and given a 6-months' probation. The family was not frightened by the incident, and are very happy to be back to their home again.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-943

Michi Kubota, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Itaru Kubota of Fresno, California, and formerly of the Colorado River Relocation Center, who is spending a few days of their summer vacation visiting with the Iwasaki family, Annie Torosian, a neighbor of the Iwasakis, and Amy Iwasaki, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Iwasaki of Rt. 1, Box 384, Reedley, enjoy a summer afternoon together playing with Amy's dog. While at the Colorado River Project, Miss Kubota's father was Chairman of the Community Council; Miss Iwasaki's mother was the first woman Block Manager of Poston.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-944

The Farm Labor Camp at Rt. 2, Box 313, Reedley, California, which is under the management of Mr. Y. Takemoto and his family, is now ready for occupancy and labor. The picture shows the Takemoto family with one of the dormitories of the camp in the background. Left to right, front row: Hisako, Rikio and Sachiko; back row: Mitsuko, Misako, Mr. and Mrs. Takemoto, and Ayako. Mr. Takemoto states that he has about 30 single men there now, but desires to have the number increased to 150 single men before the harvest of grapes starts. There will be year around work, work varying from harvesting of fruits, pruning of trees and vines, and various vegetable work during the spring months. Mr. Takemoto states the wages will be no less than 85 cents an hour and for piecework, the pay will be 5 cents a tray for Thompson and 6 cents a tray for Muscat grapes. There will be a nominal charge for room and board at the camp. Mr. Takemoto operated a labor camp for about 10 years prior to evacuation. Until his return to Reedley early this month, he was in the same type of work at Blackfoot, Idaho. His family voluntarily evacuated to Idaho, therefore, have not spent any time in a relocation center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-945

Three daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Denroku Sasaki are shown in the garden of their home located at Rt. 1, Box 276, Reedley, to which they returned from the Colorado River Relocation Center on February 8. They are left to right: Miyako, Aiko, and Fumiko Sasaki. They own a 50-acre vineyard on which the girls assist when necessary. Miyako just completed a term at the Reedley Junior College after her return from Poston. She majored in a secretarial course, therefore, she hopes to find a stenographic position soon. While in the Center, Mr. Sasaki was appointed to the Executive staff of Unit III of the Colorado River Project. The family is very pleased to be home once again after living at the Center for two and a half years.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Reedley, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-946

Mr. George M. Takeuchi is busily at his work repairing radios at his Radio Parts and Repair shop located at 1951 W. Front Street, Selma, California. Besides being in the radio business, Mr. Takeuchi carries a varied line of Japanese provisions in his store. Mr. Takeuchi returned to his former home with his wife, Fumi, from the Gila River Relocation Center on January 15. They have two sons, Haruo and Ken Ota, both of whom are now serving in the U. S. Army in the Philippine Islands.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Selma, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-947

Mrs. Uichiro Morishima, Rt. 1, Box 20, Selma, California, returned with her husband, her son and his family, Mr. and Mrs. Masato Morishima and their daughter, Masuno Dorothy, from the Gila River Relocation Center on May 12. They are temporarily living in a home of their friends until their own home is built on Masato's 20-acre farm. At present they are awaiting approval for the purchase of necessary lumber from the War Production Board. While at the Gila River Project, Masato Morishima was a member of the Community Council. When the picture was taken, all other members of the family were out picking plums on their farm.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Selma, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-948

Masaru Miyamoto is giving an apricot which he has been picking to his daughter, Susie, on his farm at Rt. 1, Box 174, Selma, California, to which he returned from the Gila River Relocation Center on March 28, with his family. The Miyamoto home was the target of a shooting on the night of May 19, 1945. There was no bodily injury to the members of the family and very little damage was done to the house. It is believed that this was the most serious of the shooting in the Fresno district, but in spite of it, the Miyamotos are glad to back to their own farm and home. They say they have had no difficulty in selling their produce and their neighbors have been very friendly to them. Mrs. Miyamoto and their son, Edward, were at home when the picture was taken.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Selma, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-949

Masaru Miyamoto is picking apricots on his farm located at Rt. 1, Box 174, Selma, California, to which he and his family returned from the Gila River Relocation Center on March 28. Mr. Miyamoto states that he has had no difficulty selling his produce. Their neighbors have been very friendly to them. The Miyamoto home was the target of a shooting on the night of May 19, which is believed to be the most serious of the shootings in the Fresno district. In spite of the incident, the Miyamoto family is glad to be back to their own home and farm. Mr. Miyamoto has a brother, Noboru, who is serving with the 442nd Infantry in Italy.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Selma, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-950

Toshihiro Masada is showing some of his Thompson Seedless grapes which he raises on his 20-acre farm at Rt. 1, Box 46, Caruthers, California, to which he returned from the Rohwer Relocation Center on March 24, 1945, with his sister, Lily. They were later joined by their mother and brothers and sisters on April 24. The Masada home was a target of one of the shooting incidents in the Fresno District on the night of May 19, 1945. Five rifle shots were fired into their home, none of which caused any injury or damage. In spite of the incident, the family is glad to be home again.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Caruthers, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-951

Front, left to right: Katsumi Masada, Mrs. Nobuye Masada, Tokio Masada, Mrs. Kyo Masada, Miyoko Masada, Toshihiro Masada; back, left to right: Lily Masada, Ted Masada, Saburo Masada, Aiko Masada, and Harold Masada. Mrs. Nobuye Masada and her children returned to their former home at Rt. 1, Box 46, Caruthers, California, from the Rohwer Relocation Center. Mrs. Kyo Masada and her sons, Ted and Harold, returned a few days ago from the Gila River Relocation Center. They are staying temporarily with Mrs. Nobuye Masada's family until they are able to occupy their own home at Rt. 5, Box 385, Fresno. The home of Mrs. Nobuye Masada was the target of one of the shooting incidents in the Fresno District on the night of May 19, 1945. No injury or damage was done by the shooting. The family is very glad to be home in spite of the incident. Mrs. Kyo Masada has another son, Yoshio, who is now serving in the U.S. Army with the 442nd Infantry.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Caruthers, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-952

Mr. Akira Chiamori, Rt. 1, Box 193, Parlier, California, returned to his farm from Chicago, Illinois, where he relocated from the Gila River Relocation Center with his family. Mr. Dillon Myer, Director of the War Relocation Authority, called on the family while he was on a tour visiting evacuee families in the Fresno district. The Chiamoris own their own farm on which are grown various grapes, peaches and plums. Mr. Chiamori has employed several evacuee families from the Centers since his return home and has provided housing for them. His family consists of his wife and two children and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tamigoro Chiamori, who resided at the Gila River Project until their return. The family are very happy to be home again and encourage friends to return home soon too. They state that they have had no difficulty in marketing their crops.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Parlier, California. 6/20/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-953

Seated on the steps of their home, the Doi family of Rt. 1, Box 53, Parlier, California, is shown left to right: front, Betty, Mr. and Mrs. Tonokichi Doi; back, Minoru, Eleanor, and Noboru. They returned from the Gila River Relocation Center in January and have since taken over the complete work of their farm composed of grapes, plums, and peaches. They state they had no difficulty in selling their produce. They have a son and brother, Toichi, who is overseas with the 442nd Infantry, a holder of two Purple Heart medals. Mr. Doi and his daughter, Betty, were among the first evacuees to return to the Fresno district since the lifting of the exclusion orders; they arrived home on January 6. Other members of the family arrived on January 24. they are all very glad to be home again.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Parlier, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-954

Mr. and Mrs. Tonokichi Doi are shown with their children, Noboru, Minoru, Eleanor, and Betty in the yard of their home at Rt. 1, Box 53, Parlier, California, to which they returned from the Gila River Relocation Center in January. Mr. Doi and his daughter, Betty, returned to their home on January 6, and the other members of the family joined them on January 24. Noboru is an honorably discharged serviceman while his brother, Toichi, is now serving with the 442nd Infantry. He is a holder of two Purple Heart medals. The entire Doi family work on their farm consisting of grapes, plums, peaches, and other crops. They have no difficulty in marketing their produce. Mrs. Doi spends most of her time with her victory garden in which she raises a variety of vegetables, namely, beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, squash, green peppers, corn, onions, bobo, Chinese cabbage, melons, and other garden vegetables.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Parlier, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-955

Noboru Doi and his father, Tonokichi Doi, are showing some of their Thompson Seedless grapes on their 72-acre vineyard located at Rt. 1, Box 53, Parlier, California, to which the family returned early in January from the Gila River Relocation Center. Mr. Doi and his daughter, Betty, were the first evacuees to return to the Parlier district since the lifting of the exclusion orders. They arrived home on January 6. The other members of the family joined them on January 24. Noboru Doi, who was honorably discharged from the Army, states that they had no difficulty in marketing their plums and peaches. Mr. Doi's brother, Toichi, is now serving with the 442nd Infantry and he is a holder of two Purple Heart medals.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Parlier, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-956

Mr. Tonokichi Doi, one of the first evacuees to return to the Fresno district from the Gila River Relocation Center since the lifting of the exclusion orders, is shown in his son's vineyard located at Rt. 1, Box 53, Parlier, California. He has a son, Toichi, who is overseas with the 442nd Infantry who was wounded twice during the war in the European theatre. Mr. Doi works on the farm with the rest of the members of his family.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Parlier, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-957

Charming Mrs. George Suda is taking dental appointments for Mr. S. Abrahams, 25 Taylor Street, San Francisco, and his son S. S. Abrahams, Jr., of the USO and U.S. Navy respectively, who are in the waiting room of Dr. Suda's dental office located at 941 E. Street, Fresno, California. Mrs. Suda is assisting her husband in his office since its opening on May 1. They returned to Fresno from the Gila River Relocation Center on March 16. Mrs. Suda is the former Sumiko Tsui of Los Angeles; they met and were married at Gila River Center. Mrs. Suda states that her appointment book is filling up rapidly and their clientele is composed of Caucasians as well as Japanese Americans.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-958

One of the first businesses to open in Fresno since the return of evacuees to the city is the office of Dr. George M. Suda, dentist, at his former location, 941 E. Street, Fresno, California. Dr. Suda is shown working on one of his patients, Miss Marie Watkins, the Executive Secretary of the Fresno International Institute. Miss Watkins and her staff have been very helpful to the return of evacuees to the Fresno district. Dr. Suda returned from the Gila River Relocation Center on March 16, where he was on the hospital staff as a dentist. He reports that he is getting very busy and his clientele is composed mostly of Caucasians.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-959

Miss Marie Watkins, the Executive Secretary of the Fresno International Institute, is getting an X-Ray of her teeth taken by Dr. George Suda with Mrs. Suda assisting. Miss Watkins and her staff are very interested in the relocation program and have been very helpful to the returning evacuees in the Fresno District. Dr. and Mrs. Suda returned to Fresno from the Gila River Relocation Center on March 16, where they both worked on the hospital staff at the Center. Mrs. Suda is the former Sumiko Tsui of Los Angeles, the couple met and were married at the Center. They state that they are getting busier each day and most of the clientele is composed of Caucasians.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-960

Dr. Robert Yabuno, Optometrist, a graduate of the University of California, is shown standing beside his new sign post before his home at 609 E. Street, Fresno, where he has just opened his office. Dr. Yabuno returned to Fresno from Chicago, Illinois, where he relocated from the Gila River Relocation Center. He and his family transferred to Gila River when the Jerome Center was closed in June, 1944. While in the Center, Dr. Yabuno worked in the hospital as Optometrist. His sister, Yomiye, returned from Gila River to assist him. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Yabuno are expected home soon. He reports that business is picking up, being the only Nisei Optometrist in the Fresno district.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-961

Mr. Tom Inouye, owner and operator of the O.K. Garage located at 1402 Kern Street, Fresno, California, returned from Burrington, Wisconsin, where he relocated from the Jerome Relocation Center with his wife and son. They returned to Fresno in February. Mr. Inouye opened the garage early in April. The O.K. Garage had approximately 60 evacuee-owned automobiles in storage, there are still about 30 cars there in storage. Mr. Inouye says his business is moving along each day and more is expected as evacuees return to the Fresno district. He has been owner of the garage since 1922 and a mechanic for over 30 years.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-962

The O.K. Garage, located at 1402 Kern Street, Fresno, California, is again re-opened for business. Mr. Tom Inouye, owner and operator, is shown working on a car belonging to one of his Caucasian customers. Mr. Inouye and his family returned to Fresno in February from Burrington, Wisconsin, where they relocated from the Jerome Relocation Center. There were approximately 60 evacuee-owned automobiles in storage at this garage and about 30 cars are still remaining. Mr. Inouye states that his business is picking up each day and more is expected as evacuees return to the Fresno district.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-963

Mrs. Busuke Saito, mother of three sons on the U.S. Army, is shown in the garden of their family home at 705 E. Street, Fresno, California, to which she and her husband returned on May 19, from the Granada Relocation Center, Amache, Colorado. The sons in service are Sgt. Leo Saito, who recently returned from the Pacific theatre of war and is now stationed at Fort Snelling, Minnesota; Pvt. Isamu Saito and Cpl. Tom Saito, who are stationed in Army camps in the states. For about 30 years prior to evacuation, the Saitos were operators of the Fresno Fish Market but feel that they will be unable to resume the same business until one of their sons return from service. Mrs. Saito says she is very happy to be home again. Mr. Saito was not home at the time the photographer arrived, therefore, is not in the picture.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-964

Alma's Beauty Salon, owned and operated by Alma Sakamoto Collier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Sakamoto, formerly of the Colorado River Relocation Center, just re-opened her new shop at 1411 Kern Street, Fresno. Alma returned to Fresno from Poston on March 19, and on May 1, was joined by her parents. Alma is assisted by Kiyo Ohashi of Madera, California, who is shown under the dryer. Miss Ohashi returned to Madera with her parents from the Rohwer Relocation Center on March 11. Alma has been a beauty operator for about 18 years; since 1933 she owned and operated her own shop in Fresno. She states that many of her former patrons have come back to her shop since its re-opening.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-965

Alma's Beauty Salon, owned and operated by Alma Sakamoto Collier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Sakamoto, formerly of the Colorado River Relocation Center, just opened her new shop at 1411 Kern Street, Fresno. Alma returned to Fresno from Poston on March 19, and on May 1, was joined by her parents. Alma is shown behind the counter of her new shop with Kiyo Ohashi, an assistant operator from Madera, California. Miss Ohashi returned to Madera with her parents from the Rohwer Relocation Center on March 11. Alma has been a beauty operator for about 18 years; since 1933 she owned and operated her own shop in Fresno. She states that many of her former patrons have come back to her shop. The flowers and greenery in the foreground and many others were presented to her on her opening day by former patrons and friends.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-966

The Buddhist Temple Hostel located at 1340 Kern Street, Fresno, California, has just been opened for occupancy for those who desire temporary housing upon their arrival in the Fresno district. The Methodist Church Hostel has been in operation for approximately two months under the direction of Rev. and Mrs. Hideo Hashimoto. Shown in this picture are those in charge of the Fresno Buddhist Temple Hostel. They are left to right: Mr. Gunichi Takata, manager, Mrs. Fujinaga, Rev. K. Fujinaga and daughter, Karen Satomi, and Mr. S. G. Sakamoto, director. All returned to Fresno from the Gila River Relocation Center except Mr. Sakamoto who returned from Colorado River Center. While in the Center, Mrs. Fujinaga was the only woman Council representative at Gila River; Mr. Sakamoto was the Chairman of the Community Council of Unit II, Poston, Arizona. There is a nominal charge for room and board at the hostel.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-967

Left to right: Toshi Hoshiko, Yoshi Hoshiko, Mitsuko Teraoka, and June Hoshiko, all of Rt. 5, Box 536, Fresno, California, formerly of Jerome Relocation Center and later the Gila River Center, Rivers, Arizona, are shown gathering apricots on the Hoshiko farm. The Hoshiko sisters returned to their former home with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Torata Hoshiko on June 14. Their brother, Hideo, is serving in the U.S. Army, and another brother, Sumio, who is now in Cleveland, Ohio, is expected to report for service soon. Two sisters, Noriko and Toyoko, are relocated in Ohio at present.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-968

Mrs. Torata Hoshiko, Rt. 5, Box 536, Fresno, California, is shown pouring a bucketful of apricots which she just picked into a box. She returned to her former home with her husband and her three daughters, Toshi, Yoshi, and June, from the Gila River Relocation Center on June 14. She is the mother of Hideo Hoshiko, who is now serving in the U.S. Armed forces, as well as Sumio, who is awaiting call into service. He now resides in Cleveland, Ohio. Noriko and Toyoko, daughters, are also relocated in Ohio.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-969

With buckets in hand, everyone is ready to go pick apricots on the Hoshiko farm at Rt. 5, Box 536, Fresno, California, to which they returned from the Gila River Relocation Center, Rivers, Arizona. They are, front, left to right, Toshi Hoshiko, Yoshi Hoshiko, Mrs. Hoshiko, Mrs. Teraoka, Mitsuko Teraoka, and June Hoshiko. Back, left to right: Henry Teraoka, Mr. Torata Hoshiko, Masaki Teraoka, Mr. Masayoshi Teraoka, and Masaji Teraoka. The Hoshiko family returned to their former home on June 14, and the Teraoka family arrived on June 20. Prior to evacuation, the Teraoka family resided at Arroyo Grande, California. They are now employed on the Hoshiko farm.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-970

Yoshi Hoshiko is showing a bucketful of apricots which she just picked to her father, Torata Hoshiko, who is driving the tractor. The Hoshiko's returned to their former home at Rt. 5, Box 536, Fresno, California, from the Gila River Relocation Center on June 14. They transferred to Gila River from Jerome Relocation Center when the latter was closed in June, 1944. Mr. Hoshiko was prominently known in the relocation centers. While at Jerome he was a Block Manager as well as the Treasurer of the Co-Op. At Gila River Mr. Hoshiko served on the Judicial Committee of the Community Council.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-971

The West Fresno Drug Co., or otherwise known as Tenshodo, owned and operated by Mr. William M. Toshiyuki, has just re-opened for business at a new location, 1431 Kern Street, Fresno. The Toshiyuki family returned to Fresno from the Rohwer Relocation Center on April 24, 1945. For 37 years prior to evacuation, the West Fresno Drug Co. has been in the same business in Fresno. The new store carries various drug and cosmetic items, most of which were stored in the WRA warehouse in Fresno. Mr. Toshiyuki is shown standing behind his drug counter ready to wait on a customer.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-972

Mr. William Toshiyuki, owner and operator of the West Fresno Drug Co., is shown selling some cosmetics to Tsuyako Yamashiro, at his store located at 1431 Kern Street, Fresno, which he just re-opened for business. He and his family, composed of his wife and two children and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Taizo Toshiyuki, returned from the Rohwer Relocation Center on April 24. The West Fresno Drug Co., or otherwise known as Tenshodo, has been in the same business for 37 years prior to evacuation in Fresno.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Fresno, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-973

Mr. Kiyoshi Robert Kanagawa, who returned to his 85-acre farm of citrus fruits and nursery stock located at Rt. 2, Box 606, Sanger, California, from the Colorado River Relocation Center, is shown budding young orange trees. The family consisting of his wife, Yukiye, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Yasoichi Kanagawa, returned home on February 8. They said they had no trouble whatsoever in marketing their citrus fruit upon their return home. A brother of Mr. Kanagawa, S/Sgt. Jerry Nobuo Kanagawa, is now serving overseas in the U.S. Army. He has three sisters who are relocated in Cleveland, Ohio.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Sanger, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-974

Mr. Kiyoshi Robert Kanagawa, who returned to his 85-acre farm of citrus fruits and nursery stock located at Rt. 2, Box 606, Sanger, California, from the Colorado River Relocation Center, is shown budding young orange trees. The family consisting of his wife, Yukiye, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Yasoichi Kanagawa, returned home on February 8. They said they had no trouble whatsoever in marketing their citrus fruit upon their return home. A brother of Mr. Kanagawa, S/Sgt. Jerry Nobuo Kanagawa, is now serving overseas in the U.S. Army. He has three sisters who are relocated in Cleveland, Ohio.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Sanger, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-975

Mr. and Mrs. Kiyoshi Robert Kanagawa are shown with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Yasoichi Kanagawa in front of their home at Rt. 2, Box 606, Sanger, California. They returned to Sanger from the Colorado River Relocation Center on February 8. Mr. Kanagawa owns an 85-acre farm, largely composed of citrus fruits and nursery stock. They had no difficulty in marketing their oranges and hired Mexican and other laborers to pick the fruits. A brother, S/Sgt. Jerry Nobuo, is now serving overseas in the U.S. Army while three sisters, Joan, Lois, and Mary are relocated in Cleveland, Ohio.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Sanger, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-976

Mr. Kiyoshi Robert Kanagawa is shown in his orange grove located at Rt. 2, Box 606, Sanger, California, to which he returned with his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Yasoichi Kanagawa, from the Colorado River Relocation Center on February 8. He owns an 85-acre farm which consists of citrus fruits and nursery stock. Mr. Kanagawa states that he just completed marketing their oranges about a month ago; he says he had no difficulty in selling them to former buyers. Kanagawa has a brother, S/Sgt. Jerry Nobuo, who is now serving overseas in the U.S. Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Sanger, California. 6/26/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-977

Mr. Ed. H. Nagata is shown picking plums on his 40-acre farm located at Rt. 1, Box 446, Kingsburg, to which he and his family returned from Ontario, Oregon, where they relocated from the Colorado River Relocation Center. The family arrived home on January 22. Mr. Nagata stated that he had no difficulty in selling his plums and is nearly finished with the picking for this season.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kingsburg, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-978

After arriving home from Ontario, Oregon, where they relocated from the Colorado River Relocation Center on January 22, the Nagata family of Rt. 1, Box 446, Kingsburg, California, have been busy working on their 40-acre farm consisting of grapes, peaches and plumbs. Mr. Ed H. Nagata, owner of the farm, is shown with his family at his home. Mr. and Mrs. K. Abe, his parents-in-law, who are now living with him, formerly lived in Orosi and expect to return to their home there soon. His sister-in-law Molly Abe is employed in the Visalia WRA office as stenographer.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kingsburg, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-979

Putting a bridle on one of his mules, Mr. Ed H. Nagata of Rt. 1, Box 446, Kingsburg, California, says it surely feels good to be home again. The family returned to their home from Ontario, Oregon, where they relocated from the Colorado River Relocation Center on January 22. Mr. Nagata raises grapes, peaches and plums on his 40-acre farm. He said he had no difficulty in marketing the plums which he is nearly finished harvesting for this season. He also stated that all his neighbors have been very friendly to them.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kingsburg, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-980

A group enjoying a rest during their noon hour on the lawn of the Yamada residence at Rt. 1, Box 66, Kingsburg, California, are front row, left to right, Ed M. Yano, Mrs. Yamada, Aiko Yamada, and Mr. Henry K. Yamada; back row, Mr. S. Yano and Mr. Fujimoto. The Yamadas returned to their former home of March 8, from the Gila River Relocation Center, Rivers, Arizona. Their son, Ted, also returned with them but has since been inducted into the Army and is stationed at Fort Douglas, Utah. Mr. Yano and his son, Ed, returned from the Gila River Center on April 15, after Ed was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army. They are temporarily living with the Yamadas until the house which they are rebuilding on their farm at Rt. 1, Box 83, Kingsburg, will be completed. Mr. Yano has two other sons, both of whom are serving in the Army. Max is stationed at Camp Wolters, Texas, and Robert is with the 442nd Infantry in Italy. Mr. Fujimoto is on a short term leave from the Gila River Relocation Center looking for relocation opportunities.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kingsburg, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-981

Mr. Henry K. Yamada is busy at work picking apricots on his son's 40-acre farm at Rt. 1, Box 66, Kingsburg, California, where he returned from the Gila River Relocation Center on March 8, with his wife, Satomi, his son, Tasuko Ted, and daughter, Aiko. Since their return home, Ted has been inducted into the U.S. Army and is now stationed at Fort Douglas, Utah. Another son, Yoshio, relocated in Minnesota. The Yamadas are very happy to be home once again to their home which was built several years prior to evacuation.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kingsburg, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-982

Aiko Yamada is shown with her pet dog on the front steps of her home to which she returned from the Gila River Relocation Center with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry K. Yamada, and her brother, Ted, who has been inducted into the U.S. Army and is stationed in Fort Douglas, Utah. Another brother, Yoshio, relocated in Minnesota. Aiko spends her time helping her mother with housekeeping and when time permits, assists her father on the farm with some of the light work.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Kingsburg, California. 6/25/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-983

Mr. and Mrs. Goichi Hase are shown with their son, Mac, and daughter, Toyo, at their home located at Rt. 2, Box 337, Lemoore, California, to which they returned from the Rohwer Relocation Center on April 2. They own a 20-acre vineyard where they lived many years prior to evacuation. They state that their neighbors have been very friendly to them and welcome their return. They have six other children who are relocated elsewhere in the country; one of them, Mae Momoyo is a Cadet Nurse at the University of Minnesota. Mac is expected to report for active duty in the Army the day after this picture was taken.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Lemoore, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-984

Mac Hase, who will be inducted into the U.S. Army tomorrow, is cutting weeds in his vineyard to get it in top-notch shape before his departure. His farm is located at Rt. 2, Box 337, Lemoore, California, to which he and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Goichi Hase, and sisters, Toyo and Ruth, returned from the Rohwer Relocation Center on April 2. The family lived on their farm for many years prior to evacuation. The family consisting of nine children are now relocated throughout the United States. The eldest daughter, Miyo, is a medical stenographer at San Francisco; Kiyo, the second daughter, is working at Camp Chaffe Station Hospital in Arkansas; Mae Momoyo is a Cadet Nurse at the University of Minnesota; Keigo, a son, is attending a school in Des Moines, Iowa, to become a laboratory technician; Yoshi, the fourth daughter, a stenographer at Cleveland, Ohio; Helen Yasue, another daughter, is attending Wesleyan University at Lincoln, Nebraska; the other three children are home with the parents.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Lemoore, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-985

Mac Hase is discussing the work of the vineyard to his father, Goichi Hase, before he leaves for the Army tomorrow. The family, composed of Mr. and Mrs. Hase and daughters, Toyo and Ruth, returned from the Rohwer Relocation Center on April 2, to their 20-acre farm located at Rt. 2, Box 337, Lemoore, California. They are very pleased to be home once again after being away for three years. Six other children are relocated elsewhere in the country; one of them, Mae Momoyo is a Cadet Nurse at the University of Minnesota.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Lemoore, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-986

Mr. Kanjiro Mayeda is shown at his home at Rt. 1, Box 374, Dinuba, to which he and his family returned from the Colorado River Relocation Center on February 27. Mr. Mayeda's son, Hiroshi, owns a 280-acre vineyard consisting of Emperor and Thompson Seedless grapes. They have been residents of the Dinuba district for the past 40 years or so, and Mr. Mayeda is one of the most prominently known Issei men in the valley. His son, Hiroshi, was inducted in the U.S. Army on June 20, and is now stationed at Fort Douglas, Utah. There are two evacuee families employed on the farm now, and several others are expected to be employed soon from the centers. There were approximately 20 to 45 evacuees employed on their farm from time to time in pre-evacuation days.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Dinuba, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-987

Mr. and Mrs. Kanjiro Mayeda of Rt. 1, Box 374, Dinuba, is shown at their home to which they returned with their son, Hiroshi and his wife, and their daughter, Hideko. Hiroshi Mayeda owns a 280-acre vineyard consisting of Emperor and Thompson Seedless grapes. The family arrived home from the Colorado River Relocation Center on February 27. They employ several families on their farm for year-round work. Hiroshi Mayeda, son and owner of the farm, was inducted into the U.S. Army on June 20, and is now stationed at Fort Douglas, Utah. The Mayedas have been residents of the Dinuba district for the past 40 years and is one of the most prominent Issei couples in the San Joaquin valley. When the picture was taken, other members of the family were not at home.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Dinuba, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-988

Mr. and Mrs. Katsunosuke Miya returned to their son's farm located at Rt. 1, Box 90, Hanford, California, from the Granada Relocation Center on May 17. Their son, Kiyoshi, who is now farming in Kansas City, Missouri, owns the 40-acre farm consisting of peaches, grapes, and apricots. They have two sons serving in the U.S. Army, Harry and Tom. Another son, Frank, is now attending Iowa State University at Ames, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Miya were residents of the Hanford district for over 35 years; therefore, they state they are very happy to be back to their home, although their children did not return with them. Mr. Miya keeps himself busy working on the farm.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hanford, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-989

Mr. and Mrs. Katsunosuke Miya of Rt. 1, Box 90, Hanford, returned from the Granada Relocation Center, where they transferred from Jerome, Arkansas, when the latter was closed last year, on May 17. Their son, Kiyoshi, who is farming in Kansas City, Missouri, owns the 40-acre farm consisting of peaches, grapes, and apricots. They have two sons serving in the U.S. Army, Harry and Tom. Another son, Frank, is now attending Iowa State University at Ames, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Miya were residents of the Hanford district for over 35 years.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Hanford, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-990

Mr. Kaudy Mimura, a native Orosan, is shown picking cucumbers on his farm located at Rt. 1, Box 43, Orosi, to which he and his wife and son, Kenneth, returned on May 6, from the Colorado River Relocation Center. The Mimuras own a 40-acre farm composed of vegetable crops, peaches and grapes. The Mimura home was the target of a shooting on the night of May 24. While at Poston, Mr. Mimura was a representative of the Community Council. Mr. Mimura's brother and his family have returned to their farm located a short distance from his farm; his parents are still at the Colorado River Center, but are expected to return to Orosi shortly.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Orosi, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-991

Mr. and Mrs. Kaudy Mimura and their son, Kenneth, is shown at their home located at Rt. 1, Box 43, Orosi, to which they returned on May 6. They own a 40-acre farm composed of peaches, grapes, and vegetable crops. The Mimura home was the target of a shooting on the night of May 24, although there was no injury nor damage done. While at Poston, Mr. Mimura was a representative of the Community Council. His brother, Ted, and his family have already returned to Orosi also. His parents will return soon from the Colorado River Project to join their sons.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Orosi, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-992

Mrs. Tadao Yamada is shown with her son and brother and sister-in-law at their home to which they returned from the Colorado River Relocation Center on June 15. The Yamada family is composed of Mr. and Mrs. Tadao Yamada and their sons and the parents and brother and sisters of Mr. Yamada. They own a 60-acre farm consisting of oranges, plums, and truck crops. When the picture was taken, the other members of the family were out on the farm picking tomatoes. Mr. Yamada has a brother, Akira, who is serving in the U.S. Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Orosi, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-993

Mr. and Mrs. Zensaku Ichimura, an Issei couple, returned to the farm of their adopted son, Henry Umino, who is expected to return soon from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he and his wife have relocated. The 60-acre farm consisting of oranges, peaches and celery is located at Rt. 1, Box 312, Orosi, California. Their home burned down sometime last year, therefore, upon their return from Poston, they obtained sufficient material to build a new house. Mrs. Ichimura is picking roses in her flower garden while her husband is working on the farm.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Orosi, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-994

Mr. and Mrs. Zensaku Ichimura, an Issei couple, returned to their home at Rt. 1, Box 312, Orosi from the Colorado River Relocation Center on March 30. After their return they built a new home, as their former home had burned after evacuation. They stated that they were able to get sufficient material for building a house. The farm, which is owned by an adopted son, Henry Umino, who is returning from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he and his wife are relocated, is composed of peaches, oranges, and celery. They expect celery to be their main crop. Mrs. Ichimura is shown cooking lunch in the kitchen of her new home. Mr. Ichimura has been working on the farm since his return from the center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Orosi, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-995

Mr. John Yamamoto, owner of a 190-acre farm composed largely of citrus fruits and truck crops, returned to his home in Orosi from the Colorado River Relocation Center with his family on January 10. The family is shown at their home located near the foothills of Orosi, and are, left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Yamamoto, Marvin Yamamoto, Kiyoshi Hayakawa, a neighbor boy who returned from Poston with his parents, and Francis Yamamoto. Mr. Yamamoto and his family are very glad to be back to their own home which they built a few years prior to evacuation. While at Poston, Mr. Yamamoto was a Block Manager in Unit III.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Orosi, California. 6/27/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-996

The heads of the Kishi families at Livingston, California, are seen on the lawn in front of the Chiyoko Kishi home at Rt. 1, Box 318. Seated, left to right: Shozo Kishi, Chiyoko Kishi, Tajiro, Kishi; the youngster seated in the foreground is Sheldon Kishi, grandson of Tajiro Kishi. The above family returned from the Granada Relocation center in April, and are now living on a forty-acre vineyard owned and operated by Mayme Kishi, daughter of Chiyoko Kishi. Other members of the Tajiro Kishi family include Roy Kishi, son; Mary Kishi, his wife; Norman Kishi, his son; Tokuku, Thais, and Donna, Norman's wife and two daughters. The Chiyoko Kishi family also includes Shige Kishi, husband, Lucy and Mayme Kishi, daughters living at Livingston, Fred and Sherman, sons, who are in the United States Army, Miko, daughter, who is attending school in Wyoming.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Livingston, California. 6/28/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-997

Mr. Frank Kaneda, formerly of Gila River Center, is pictured in front of the hostel at 1239 South Monroe Street, Stockton, California. Mr. Kaneda arrived in May, but his wife, Mino, is still in the center. This building was purchased by the Stockton Japanese Church for use as a hostel for the returnees, and is situated in a very nice section of the city.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Stockton, California. 6/28/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-998

Mr. and Mrs. Masataro Tabuchi was one of the first to return to their hometown, Stockton, from the Rohwer Relocation Center. They are pictured in front of their residence at 1308 South Monroe. Other members of the family are Masako Agari, daughter, Shigeko, daughter, and George, a son. A son-in-law, Junsuke Agari, is now serving with the United States Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Stockton, California. 6/28/45

Volume 54, Section F, WRA no. I-999

Mr. Kajiro Tanioka exhibits a sample of sweet corn growing on his farm at Rt. 2, Box 685, Merced, California. Mr. Tanioka returned to his home April 1, and the other members of the family joined him June 10. The Tanioka family operates a 32-acre farm which includes 20 acres of almond, some figs, and some walnut trees, and the balance vegetables, which include tomatoes, cantaloupes, sweet corn, and onions. The family has been relocated from the Granada Relocation Center, and consists in addition to Mr. Tanioka, Fude, Takako, Charles, Mary, Myrtle, James, Anna, Marlene, and Helen.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Merced, California. 6/29/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-103

John Della Maggoire, San Jose orchardist, is one Santa Clara County rancher who solved the housing shortage for his recently arrived evacuee help by gathering up odds and ends of lumber until he scraped together a couple of houses. He is shown here with two of his workmen, Toy Sakae from Poston and Hisajiro Inouye from Gila, and the two Della Maggoire sons, Richard and Armand. Roy, 23 and 4F, is helping Della Maggoire build to house the Sakae family (preevacuation address, San Juan) including his father, Ichiro, his mother Kosuye, and his sisters, Katie, Lily and Marylan and brother, Shizuo. His brother, Henry, is a recent army inductee. Hisajiro Inouye, too, is employed on the Della Maggoire Housing project. He resides on his own ranch where the entire Inouye family recently relocated on Gish Road near San Jose.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/14/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-106

Relocation is complete for Riichi Nishimura, but it took the cooperation of his Caucasian ranch owner friend, Joe Doetsch and a little skill with hammer, level, and saw. Shortly after the lifting of the ban, Mr. Doetsch got in touch with the Relocation Officer in San Jose to assist him in getting his friend Mr. Nishimura and family back on his orchard near Campbell, from the Heart Mountain Relocation Center. Mr. Doetsch had no housing available, but by doing a lot of hard work, he managed to scrape together sufficient building material to construct temporary housing. Then, he sent for Nishimura, and soon had the family housed, against the elements. Mr. and Mrs. Nishimura are now at home with their friends. One married daughter and their son, Joseph, have relocated in Chicago. Mr. Nishimura is employed by his Caucasian friend. The Nishimura were employed by Mr. Doetsch for many years prior to evacuation.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Los Gatos, California. 7/13/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-11

Sixteen-year-old Raymond Motoike and Ben Motoike, who are cousins, from the Manzanar Relocation Center are cutting the celery plants at Camp no. 5, Bacon Island, Stockton, California.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Stockton, California. 6/30/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-111

It takes many hands and a lot of stooping to cultivate and bleach celery, particularly a 40-acre patch of celery. That is why Masashi Namimatsu, known to his friends as Frank, calls upon a considerable group of evacuees to give him a hand on his San Jose ranch at 491 Boynton Avenue. Shown here working in the Namimatsu celery are Lily Takemoto, voluntary evacuee and relocatee from Utah, Tets Kifune, recently arrived from Heart Mountain, Masazo Kifune, father of Tets, Eddie Akizuki, recently returned from Gila, and Masami Kifune, relocated from Heart Mountain. Lily is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kajiro Takemoto, who are now employed on the Bracker ranch near Santa Clara, California. The Takemoto family returned to San Jose in April from Fielding, Utah, at which place they voluntarily evacuated. The Kifunes returned from Heart Mountain in June of this year, and their relocation is now complete, except, of course, for Tomio, who is in the army at Camp Ritchie, Maryland. Eddie Akizuki, his father, Tsutomu, his mother, Yoshiko, sister, Bernice, and brother, Gary, all returned to San Jose from Gila in June. The Akizukis are housed temporarily with the K. Kogura family in San Jose.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/11/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-112

One of the live wires of the San Jose evacuee farm colony is Masashi--Frank to his friends--Namimatsu, shown here inspecting his celery crop near San Jose. Besides farming his own place, Frank has been a life saver to many of the evacuees who are without farm equipment. He has kept his several tractors running day and night helping his neighbors get their land into shape for planting. Frank arrived here from Salt Lake City by way of Gila in February of this year. With him are his wife, Toshiko, his three daughters, Phyllis, Frances, and June; and his brother, Hiroshi. In spite of the fact that he has been here only a short time, Frank is now maturing one of the largest celery crops in the Santa Clara Valley--approximately 40 acres. Some indication of his business ability and of the attitude of the large banks toward relocation may be drawn from the fact that Frank recently borrowed $25,000 from a San Jose Bank with which to produce his celery crop. I see no difference in public sentiment now than before evacuation, says Frank. We have no difficulty buying supplies of any kind if they are available at all and we have already had a number of buyers inquiring about our celery crop. With us everything is okay.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/11/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-113

Masashi Namimatsu, relocated from Salt Lake City and Gila to his vegetable ranch at 491 Boynton Avenue, San Jose, is shown here with his three daughters, Phyllis, 18; Frances, 12, and June, 11. The picture is taken at the Namimatsu home. Masashi--Frank to his friends--is one of the fortunate farmers who retained all of his farm equipment throughout evacuation. When he returned to his home in February of this year, he brought his equipment with him and since that time his several tractors have been worked day and night helping other evacuees get their land into shape for planting. Frank is one of the largest growers of celery in the San Jose District. He now has about 40 acres planted to this crop and the cultivation of it requires considerable extra labor. Frank is using evacuees exclusively on his farm. Public reception? repeated Frank when asked how he had been received. Just say it is better than before evacuation so far as the Namimatsus are concerned.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/11/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-117

Will we pose with our Japanese friends? said Mr. F. W. Bracker when the cameraman caught up with him on the famous Bracker ranch, Route 1, Box 1006, Santa Clara, California. Just watch us. Then the famous grower of equally famous Santa Clara County pears lined up the oldsters of the little Bracker Relocation Project as follows: First row: Tokuhei Sawabe, K. E. Bracker, Kajiro Takimoto, Mrs. Chiyoko Takimoto. Second row: Mrs. Shiki Sawabe, F. W. Bracker, Frank Chikuma, and G. A. Bracker. The Sawabes are from the Poston Center; the Chikumas are from Heart Mountain, and the Takimotos are voluntary evacuees who returned to the Bracker ranch in April of this year from Fielding, Utah. Mrs. Chikuma passed away at Heart Mountain, and the Chikuma household is now managed by 18-year-old Alice and her sister, Helen. The Sawabes have a son, Pfc. Harvey, in the armed forces of the 442nd now stationed in Italy. The Takimotos' son, Carlo, in the armed forces at camp Wolters, Texas.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Santa Clara, California. 7/12/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-118

With the Bracker family, famous Santa Clara County growers of pears and other fruits, relocation is only homecoming of their former Japanese families. At the moment the Brackers have the families of Frank Chikuma (Heart Mountain), Tokuhei Sawabe (Poston), and the Kajiro Takimoto, voluntary evacuees from Fielding, Utah. In addition, the Brackers are employing many day-workers of Japanese ancestry. As more housing is available, they plan to employ more Japanese. Shown in this group are, front row: Nobu Sawabe, Yaeko Sawabe, Junior Takimoto, Irene Takimoto, Allen Chikuma, Karen Chikuma, Teddy Chikuma, and Kajiro Takimoto. Second row: Mitsuko Sawabe, Ayako Sawabe, Mrs. Chiyoko Takimoto, Lily Takimoto, Alice Chikuma, and George Chikuma. Third row: Mrs. Shiki Sawabe, Tokuhei Sawabe, F. W. Bracker, Frank Chikuma, K. E. Bracker, and G. A. Bracker. Their address is Route 1, Box 1006, Santa Clara, California.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Santa Clara, California. 7/12/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-119

The Bracker ranch near Santa Clara, California, is famous throughout the world for its Bartlett and Winter pears. Proof that they also grow some peaches is contained in this snap-shot. In the front row are Lily Takimoto, 19; Alice Chikuma, 19, Heart Mountain; Mitsuko Sawabe, 18, Poston; back row: Ayako Sawabe, 25; Yaeko Sawabe, 16; and Nobuko Sawabe, 21, all from Poston. The three families are employed permanently on the Bracker ranch, Route 1, Box 1006, Santa Clara, California, as are many day-workers from various Centers. Most of these people live in the Hostel, and are transported back and forth in one of the Bracker trucks. The Chikumas returned from Heart Mountain in March of this year, the Sawabes returned from Poston in June, and the Takimotos, voluntary evacuees, returned from Utah in April.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Santa Clara, California. 7/12/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-12

A farmer Rohwer resident, Kayo Takechi, is now making use of her Gregg College training in Chicago, as a stenographer at the War Relocation Authority office in Stockton, California. Her family resides at Camp no. 5, Bacon Island, Stockton, California, and because of the distance she boards with a Caucasian family in the city.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Stockton, California. 7/2/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-136

With light heart and a prayer of thanks that the big job of relocation is over for him, Tom Tomizo Yamasaki, recent arrival in San Jose from Heart Mountain, preps prune trees on the ranch near Mountain View, California. The Yamasaki family, twelve strong, are housed in a new modern bungalow on the Neilson ranch. Two daughters, Margarite and Irene, and Tome, Tom's sister, found employment in Palo Alto homes a few days after arriving at their new home. With us, Tom said, people seem even more friendly than before evacuation. Much has happened to us since returning and it has all been good. Tom reports everyone old enough is working in the fruit harvest who is not otherwise employed. Located with Tom are his sister, Tome, and his father, Tomitaro, 76, and mother, Tochi, 72. His own family consists of his wife, Kiyoko, and the following children: Margarite, 20; Irene, 19; Alice, 17; Thomas Shoichi, 15; Edith, 12; Kenji, 8; Joyce, 4.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Mountain View, California. 7/10/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-143

Five sons in the Army! Ten children in all. This is the proud record of Mr. and Mrs. Takejiro Kodama, lately from Poston Center, now waiting out the war on the ranch home of their son-in-law, Shigio Masunaga near San Jose. With them are Ruth, 16; Roy, 14; and Geraldine, 12. Mr. Kodama is 66 and Mrs. Kodama is 54. In the army are Cpl. Shosaku in Australia, Pfc. Harry in the famous 442nd in Europe, Pfc. James at Fort Meade, Pfc. George at Fort Knox and Pfc. Oscar is at Camp Hood, Texas. Mrs. Shig Masunaga (nee Hiroko Kodama) is mighty happy to have her family with her for the duration. We are a bit crowded, she said, but we do not mind. Mother helps out around the house and father putters around the garden. The important thing is we are all out of camp together. Prior to evacuation the Kodamas resided in the Imperial Valley. Tamiki Kodama, tenth of the Kodama children, has relocated in Salt Lake City.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/9/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-146

Shown left to right are Jimmy Uchiyama, and his two cousins, Leo and Robert Uchiyama, on the vegetable farm of the father of the latter two, Sam Isamu Uchiyama. Both families are recent arrivals from Poston Center. They are now located on Sterling Road at the city limits of Mountain View where the Uchiyamas are making the California soil shell out turnips, carrots, broccoli, cabbage, celery, tomatoes--what have you, for the Nation's food basket. With the Uchiyamas and employed by them are the Kiyutaro Nishijimas and Mr. and Mrs. Itaru Nakatsu and family. When work is slack at the ranch, said Raymond, we all work in nearby orchards. That is--all of us who are old enough. And we are quite a crowd too. When all are present we total about 50--I have lost the exact count. Even a smaller family would not be lonely in the Mountain View District. For relocated almost in stone's throw of the Uchiyama front gate are the families of Masataro Fujii, Roy Iwata, Leonark Oku, Masao Oku and Alice Koyano, all florist nurserymen.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Mountain View, California. 7/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-147

Mrs. Yoshiko Joan Nakatsu, wife of Itaru Nakatsu, recent relocatees in the Mountain View section of California from Gila, working in the turnips on the Sam Isamu Uchiyama vegetable farm. Mr. and Mrs. Nakatsu have their four children Naomi, Herbert, James, and Kenneth back in a real if humble home, as they put it. I don't know from experiences much about public reception, said Nakatsu. Everyone is working in the vegetables or in nearby orchards, contributing our bit to the war effort by producing food. If anything, people seem to be more friendly--more tolerant and sympathetic--than before evacuation. In the Nakatsu and Uchiyama families the girls are learning to cook, to shop, to care for the home and otherwise to live again like ordinary Americans. I am afraid home was only a word to me before evacuation, Mrs. Nakatsu said. Now that we are really back I find that Home is one of the most meaningful words in our language.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Mountain View, California. 7/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-148

Miss Alice Uchiyama, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Katsuzo Uchiyama, recent relocatees from Poston Center, pulling turnips on the vegetable farm of her uncle, Sam Isamu Uchiyama near Mountain View, California. Besides her parents, Alice has a sister, Kasumi, and three brothers, James, Charles, and William, in the family. Two older brothers are in the Army. Kazuo is in Germany and Alvin Eizo is in Italy. Until summer vacation came, Kasumi and William were attending school in Denver. When the Uchiyama youngsters are not employed in the vegetables being grown by the family, they are picking fruit on nearby orchards of Caucasian neighbors. Everyone is nice to us, Alice said. In the stores, ice cream parlors, on the street or working in the orchards, people treat us as friends and as American citizens. It is good to be back home in California where everyone in the family except father and mother were born. All of the children who have not graduated will enter the Mountain View schools this coming fall term.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Mountain View, California. 7/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-149

Itaro Nakatsu, 37-year-old citizen, came to San Jose from Gila to have a look see at relocation around his old pre-evacuation stamping ground. Soon he had hooked up in a vegetable crop share deal with his brother-in-law, Sam Isamu Uchiyama, near Mountain View, California. The camera caught him in the act of giving his thirsty acres a liberal drink of California aqua pura. Itaro quickly converted to indefinite leave and, armed with a few carpenter tools, set about converting an old packing shed into water tight if inartistic living quarters for his wife, Joan, and four children. Now the family address is Mountain View, California, and the chief order of business for all hands is adding to the Nation's war effort by producing vegetables. When not busy on the truck garden, the entire family picks fruit for nearby Caucasian neighbors. The children are Naomi, Herbert, James and Kenneth. Those of school age will enter the Mountain View public school this coming fall term.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Mountain View, California. 7/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-150

Katsuzo Uchiyama, 55-year-old former San Jose fruit grower, is proud of his two sons in the Army overseas, of his family in general and of his vegetables, wrested from the soil to add to the Nation's war effort. He is shown here with a freshly pulled turnip taken from the ground on the 43-acre vegetable farm where the Uchiyamas--50 strong--led by Uncle Sam Uchiyama--are relocated from Poston and Gila Centers. Katsuzo and Sumi, his wife, have five children with them--Alice, James, Charles, William and Kasumi. Two older sons--Kazuo and Alvin--are in the armed forces on the European continent. Katsuzo and his brother, Sam Isamu, are growing tomatoes, carrots, turnips, celery, and other garden sass on a share crop basis. Thus far, they have had no trouble in buying supplies or in marketing their produce. Crops are good--prices are high and public reception is all that could be asked around Mountain View, Katsuzo said. And then he added: We have housing and we are all home again. What more could we ask?

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Mountain View, California. 7/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-151

The Uchiyamas are back in California. nearly 50 strong, hard at work producing vegetables--food for the Nation. Sam Uchiyama, 40-year-old citizen, is the Director-General of the enterprise. Early in April, Sam decided his future and the welfare of Mrs. Uchiyama and their six children lay in their home county in California, and not in Poston Relocation Center. With the help of the San Jose WRA office, Sam leased on a share crop basis 40 acres of vegetable land on Sterling Road, Mountain View, and donned his working clothes. Sam found the various Government agencies cooperative and the banks ready to resume operations where they left off at evacuation time. His operation was financed by a large San Jose bank without difficulty. As soon as housing had been prepared, Sam sent for Haruko, his wife, and Leo, Buddy, Aiko, Uriko, and Emiko. Raymond, 15, the oldest, had been on the ranch driving tractor for his dad for several weeks. Katsuzo Uchiyama, older brother of Sam, soon joined the colony as did his father-in-law and mother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Kiyutaro Nishijima from Gila Center and his brother-in-law, Itaru Nakatsu, his wife and four children, Naomi, Herbert, James, and Kenneth, trailed along. Now Sam's younger brother, Shigeru, is arranging to bring Mrs. Uchiyama and their six children from Poston to join the colony. Shown here is Charles Uchiyama washing turnips for the San Francisco market.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Mountain View, California. 7/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-152

Jimmy Nakatsu, son of Mr. and Mrs. Itaru Nakatsu, recent relocatees from Gila Center, is one of the younger hands on the vegetable farm of his uncle, Sam Isamu Uchiyama, adjoining the town limits of Mountain View, California. Jimmy and his two brothers, Herbert and Kenneth, and his sister, Naomi, have discovered there is a lot of work to growing vegetables for the nation's food basket and that a great deal of it can be done by smart and ambitious youngsters. Uncle Sam is more than a nickname for a tall man with chin whiskers and wide striped pants to Jimmy. To him uncle Sam is his vegetable-growing real uncle who established the business a few months back, built houses, repaired others and brought out of Gila and Poston Center 50 people--all relatives--to grow food. While Jimmy and the other youngsters are busy with their jobs this harvesting season, he still finds time for baseball--there are almost two full teams in the four families relocated together--and an occasional picture show.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Mountain View, California. 7/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-164

Jim Miyano at feeding time on his ranch, Route 4, Box 114, Petaluma, California. Jim was the second man to return to the Petaluma area. This fine flock of Leghorns reflect the care of an expert. Jim was formerly a resident of the Granada Relocation Center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Petaluma, California. 8/6/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-165

Jim Miyano in a small potato field on his ranch, Route 4, Box 114, Petaluma, California. Jim says he is operating his chicken sheds at only about one-tenth volume, therefore he is growing potatoes on the ground that would not otherwise be in use. Ordinarily this ground would be in kale. Jim was formerly a resident of the Granada Relocation Center. He is now one of the committeemen in the Petaluma area.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Petaluma, California. 8/6/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-174

Risuke Kawaoka, father of Frank Kawaoka, on his ranch at Route 1, Box 113, Petaluma, California. He was formerly a resident of the Granada Relocation Center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Petaluma, California. 8/7/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-201

This picture was taken in front of the Presbyterian Church Hostel, 727 T Street, Sacramento, California. The Reverend Isamu Nakamura is the minister. Back row (left to right)--Mr. Takejiro Shimatsuko (Granada); The Reverend Isamu Nakamura (Granada); Mrs. K. Oshima (Granada); The Reverend Igarashi (Heart Mountain); William Otani (Granada). Front row (left to right)--Etsu and Miye Nakamura, daughters of the Reverend Nakamura; Mr. K. Oshima (Granada); Mr. Y. Hirotsu (Topaz); Mrs. Shimatsuko (Granada).

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Sacramento, California. 8/11/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-211

This picture was taken at 522 N Street, Sacramento, California. Reading from left to right: Mitsu Hara, from Topaz; H. Matamura and Mrs. Y. Matamura, from Heart Mountain; Akio Hayashi, from Caldwell, Idaho; Su Harada, from Reno, Nevada; Hiroshi Takemoto, from Amache, Colorado; Grace Sigami, from Minidoka; M. Niyashi, from Topaz; and Peter Osuga, from Heart Mountain. The children in the foreground are boys and girls of visitors and guests of relocatees. Su Harada is most active in this hostel and devotes most of her time to its management. Mrs. Harada is the wife of Captain Harada, who is now serving with the United States Army in Germany.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Sacramento, California. 8/16/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-216

A meeting was held this morning by the Board of Directors and the Hostel Trustees at the Buddhist Church on Pine Street to discuss plans for providing a hostel within the Buddhist Temple building. Left to right: front row: Mr. Kazo Fukagai, Hostel Trustee, Gila; Rev. Zenkai Okayama, director and trustee, Topaz; Rev. Shinjiro Nagutomi, trustee, Manzanar; Rev. Shintatsu Sanada, trustee of Topaz; back row: Left to right: Mr. Matsuzo Kurokawa, director, Topaz; Kihei Ikeda, director, Topaz; Mr. Luther Hoffman, Project Director, Topaz; Mr. Kami, director, Topaz; and Mr. Mitsuso Uyeda, director, Topaz.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Francisco, California. 7/23/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-220

Mrs. Helen Matsumoto is shown in the file room of the FPHA. Mrs. Matsumoto is formerly of Poston and is now residing in San Francisco. Her husband, Staff Sergeant George Matsumoto, is stationed in Italy.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Francisco, California. 7/23/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-223

Shown is a group of FPHA employees. In the front row, left to right, there are two Nisei girls: Marie Kai (Granada) and Arrice Mizono (Topaz). Back row, left to right: Mae Tanaka (Topaz) and Helen Matsumoto (Poston).

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Francisco, California. 7/23/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-235

Working in the Sequoia Nursery in Redwood City, California, are (from left to right) Hirosuke Inouye, Topaz; Satoru Yamada, Gila; Hio Kashima, Topaz; and Dick Arimoto, Topaz. They returned to find their six greenhouses in excellent condition--not a window pane broken. During the past three years, the greenhouses, devoted exclusively to gardenias, has been under the management of the four Wong brothers. Mr. Inouye, a Stanford graduate '38, Biological Science, and Mr. Arimoto teach at Stanford University's Civil Affairs Training School.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Redwood City, California. 7/19/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-278

Shuji Kanno, Route 4, Box 739, Santa Ana, California. Mr. Kanno, formerly of Poston, is the owner of 20 acres of land and has been back to his home since April, 1945. The acreage is planted to asparagus. He is having no difficulties in selling his crop. Mr. Kanno is very cooperative and has and still is offering temporary living quarters to returnees. He has one son in the U.S. Army.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Santa Ana, California. 9/12/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-279

Mr. and Mrs. Juichi Shimazu, Route 4, Box 752, Santa Ana, California. Mr. Shimazu, formerly of Poston, owns 10 acres at the above address. He reports that he has no difficulty in marketing his produce, which this season consisted principally of tomatoes. During Mr. Shimazu's absence, his ranch was leased to Augustine Duarte, a Mexican tenant, from whom he received excellent cooperation and not only during his absence, but also since his return to his land.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Santa Ana, California. 9/12/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-281

Mrs. Henry Akiyama is pictured on her Pacific Gold Fish Farm, Garden Grove, California. Mr. and Mrs. Akiyama have leased 40 acres at this address (N.W. corner of First and Golden West Boulevard) for the last 11 years. They are formerly of Poston and report no difficulties in disposing of all goldfish they are able to deliver to the market.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Garden Grove, California. 9/13/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-282

Mr. Henry Akiyama is shown on his Pacific Gold Fish Farm, Garden Grove, California. Mr. and Mrs. Akiyama have leased 40 acres at this address (N.W. corner of First and Golden West Boulevard) for the last 11 years. They are formerly of Poston and report no difficulties in disposing of all goldfish they are able to deliver to the market.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Garden Grove, California. 9/13/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-283

This photo shows the following: Takajiro and Mitsuko Nishimoto, husband and wife; Tsui Nishimoto; Amy Watanabe and Yoko Nishimoto, 3055 Madison Street, Arlington, California. These evacuees returned last May from Poston. Mr. Nishimoto's son, Mac, formerly operated a fleet of vegetable trucks but has, since the evacuation, leased them to a Caucasian.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Arlington, California. 9/8/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-29

Mr. Itaro Nakada, left, and Tero Tanaka, right, examining chrysanthemums at Mr. Nakada's place. Mr. Nakada has 30,000 chrysanthemums started in the family nursery at Rt. 2, Box 7, Tracy, California, and expects to have at least 100,000 chrysanthemums to sell. Mr. Nakada has plant patents on some unusual chrysanthemums. Mr. Nakada has two sons in the service--Thomas, stationed in France, and Daniel in the United States.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Tracy, California. 7/2/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-296

John Yamane, 1908 Redondo Blvd., Gardena, California, operates the Golden Nursery. He was formerly at Poston. Operating with him are his three brothers, Carl, Henry, and Frank. He reports that he is having marketing difficulties.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Gardena, California. 9/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-297

Pictured are John, Frank, Carl, and Henry Yamane, operators of the Golden Nursery at 1908 Redondo Blvd., Gardena, California. They are from the Poston Relocation Center.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Gardena, California. 9/5/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-32

A group of workers in a Lodi, California, vineyard. Pictured are Mickey Yoshimoto and the Komatsu Brothers, formerly of Gila.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Lodi, California. 7/1/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-34

Ko Hirata, Rt. 1, Box 65, Linden, California, returned from the Manzanar Center early in April to resume operation of a 32-acre farm. Mr. Hirata recently purchased the Farmall he is driving and also a diesel tractor. He is growing 19 acres of tomatoes, 3-acres of cherry trees, and the balance in vegetables. He has a wife, Toshiye, and two daughters, Grace and Ruth, and a son, Henry.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Linden, California. 7/2/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-35

The Hirata family returned from the Manzanar center early in April to their farm at Rt. 1, Box 65, Linden, California. Left to right, Ko Hirata, Henry, Grace, Mrs. Hirata, and Ruth, in their tomato field. In addition to 19-acres of tomatoes they are growing 3-acres of cherry trees and the balance in vegetables.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Linden, California. 7/2/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-61

Nisei instructors in the Japanese language are busy youngsters teaching army officers at Stanford University. Shown here before the Stanford Main Library and Hoover Tower are: Front row left to right, Richard Arimoto (Granada and Topaz), Los Angeles; Ryuji Adachi (Topaz), Redwood City, California; Sumi Sugimoto (Topaz), Redwood City, California; Kenneth Fujiyoshi (Manzanar), Los Angeles; Masato W. Kato (Gila), Los Angeles; Masaye Masuyama (Manzanar), Los Angeles; and Professor A. E. Sokol of Stanford. Middle row: Hirosuke Inouye (Topaz), Redwood City, California; Alice Hanasaki (Gila), Compton, California; Margaret Nakagawa (Topaz), San Francisco; Helen Ban (Manzanar), Los Angeles; Mary Jane Hamachi (Topaz), Centerville, California; and Irene Hirose (Topaz), San Francisco. Back row: Keiji K. Kubo (Topaz), Sacramento; Clark Saito (Gila), Parlier, California; Hiroshi Waki (Gila), Los Angeles; Helen Takahashi (Topaz), San Francisco; and Henry Handa (Manzanar), Los Angeles.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Palo Alto, California. 7/15/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-62

Here are some of the reasons--nine by exact count--why army life is not all that Sherman said of war. Teachers of the Japanese language to Army Officers in the Civil Affairs School of Stanford University, a group of Nisei gals pose with Prof. A. E. Sokol of Stanford, head of the school, before the main library and Hoover Tower. Left to right they are: Masaye Masuyama (Manzanar), Los Angeles; Sumi Sugimoto (Topaz), Redwood City, California; Mary Jane Hamachi (Topaz), Centerville, California; Helen Takahashi (Topaz), San Francisco; Helen Ban (Manzanar), Los Angeles; Prof. A. E. Sokol of Stanford, Margaret Nakagawa (Topaz), San Francisco; Julia Kitayama (Manzanar), Los Angeles; Alice Hamasaki (Gila), Compton, California; and Irene Hirose (Topaz), San Francisco.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Palo Alto, California. 7/15/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-63

Two pairs in poker is only a fair hand but these two pair of Nisei teachers at Stanford University are hard to beat according to Prof. A. E. Sokol, head of the Civil Affairs Training School for officers. Here in front of Stanford Memorial Church (left to right) are Genzo Soraoka (Gila), Pasadena, California; Julia Kitayama (Manzanar), Los Angeles, California; Mary Jane Hamachi (Topaz), Centerville, California; and Keiji K. Kubo (Topaz), Sacramento, Calif. Twenty-two Nisei, about half women, are teaching at Stanford. No summer vacation, either, this year. Both men and women live on the campus.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Palo Alto, California. 7/15/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-64

Here is a group of Nisei contributing to the war effort by teaching the Japanese language to officers and men in the Civil Affairs Training School of the army at Stanford University. Shown in front of the arch-way to Memorial Court, they are: Front row, left to right, Keiji Kubo (Topaz), Sacramento, California; Ryuji Adachi (Topaz), Redwood City, California; Clark Saito (Gila), Parlier, California; Richard Arimoto (Granada and Topaz) Los Angeles; Kenneth Fujiyoshi (Manzanar), Los Angeles. Back row, left to right, Hirosuke Inouye (Topaz), Redwood City, California; Hiroshi Waki (Gila), Los Angeles; Masato Kato (Gila), Los Angeles; Henry Handa (Manzanar), Los Angeles; and Genzo Soraoka (Gila), Pasadena, California.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Palo Alto, California. 7/15/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-85

Among the pioneers of relocation in San Jose are Mr. and Mrs. Shigetaka Onishi and their son, Richard. Mr. and Mrs. Onishi arrived in San Jose from Denver, where they had relocated, in January, 1945. They were formerly at Heart Mountain. The Onishis have a modern bungalow home at 175 Taylor Street, San Jose. Mr. Onishi is a contract gardener. Mr. and Mrs. Onishi are shown here with their friend Shigetomo Motoike, recent evacuee from Heart Mountain who is now employed as a gardener at Alum Rock Sanitarium, San Jose.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/14/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-94

Kiyo Kitazawa, wife of Buemon Kitazawa, florist of San Jose, in the garden of the Kitazawa home at 597 Polhemus Street, San Jose. The Kitazawas returned from Manzanar Center in April of this year and are now hard at work getting back into production of flowers and shrubs. Their son, George Kitazawa, is a graduate of Syracuse University in chemistry and is now employed in his profession in Syracuse, New York.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/12/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-95

One of San Jose's widely known and highly respected residents is Buemon Kitazawa, grower of rare shrubs and flowers at his little nursery at 597 Polhemus Street, San Jose. Mr. and Mrs. Kitazawa returned from Manzanar Center in April of this year. Their son, George, is employed as a chemical engineer in Syracuse, New York. Mr. Kitazawa is prominent in the activities of the Japanese Methodist Church in San Jose. His brother, Gijiu Kitazawa, formerly of Heart Mountain Center, arrived in San Jose from Detroit, Michigan, with his daughter, Mae, recently to plan for relocation of the family.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/12/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-96

You can say the Kato family has resumed where we left off at evacuation time. Thus epitomized Yasuto Kato the relocation of the well-known Warm Springs family. They are busy growing tomatoes and other garden truck on their ranch and are marketing through regular channels without incident. Shown here, left to right, are Robert Utsumi, a nephew of Katsu and Taijyu, Katsu, 60, his son, Yasuto, Taijyu, and Tomiko Dorothy, wife of Yasuto. Missing from the group are Joe Kato, brother of Yasuto, who was killed in action in France, and Henry, a member of the 442nd infantry still in Italy. The Katos were evacuated to Topaz, and were one of the first families to relocate at Tree Mountain, Utah. They returned to their home in March of this year. Address P.O. Box 87, Warm Springs, California.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Warm Springs, California. 7/14/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-97

Robert Utsumi, and his uncle, Yasuto Kato, Warm Springs vegetable growers, are shown here inspecting tomato plants on the Kato ranch. They told the camera man the plants are in fine condition and a good yield is anticipated. They have arranged to market their crops thru established channels. Robert is from Central Utah camp. He arrived in California in June to make a hand for his uncle until school opens for the fall term, when he plans to enter San Jose State College. The Katos relocated from Tree Mountain, Utah, via Topaz in March. With Yasuto is his wife, Dorothy, Taijyu, and his father, and Katsu, his mother. The Katos is a Gold Star home, their son, Joseph, having been killed in action on October 16, 1944,while the famous 442nd, all Japanese unit, was rescuing the Lost Battalion of this war. S/Sgt. Henry Kato, a second son, is still in Europe. The two Kato girls are both nurses, Kiyo at a marine hospital in New Orleans and Sumi at St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Warm Springs, California. 7/14/45

Volume 55, Section F, WRA no. K-98

Taijyu Kato, Gold Star father of the Warm Springs area of California, sprinkles celery plants in the hot house of the Kato ranch at Warm Springs, near San Jose, California. The Kato family came home to their vegetable ranch and modern home from Tree Mountain, Utah, via Topaz in March, 1945. With Taijyu are Mrs. Kato and Mr. and Mrs. Yasuto Kato. Joe Kato, a son, was killed in action in the engagement when the 442nd, all Japanese unit, rescued the Lost Battalion of World War II on October 16, 1944. S/Sgt. Henry Kato, another son, is with the army in England. The two Kato girls are nurses, Kiyo at a marine hospital in New Orleans and Sumi at St. Marks hospital in Salt Lake City.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Warm Springs, California. 7/14/45

Volume 78, Section I, WRA no. -150

Mrs. Fred Mittwer, who writes under the name of Mary Oyama, relocated in Denver from Heart Mountain in January, 1943. Mrs. Mittwer is the author of the article My Only Crime is My Face, which appeared in the August, 1943, issue of Liberty Magazine. She has directed her writing ability in the past two years toward attempting to break down misconceptions on the part of Caucasians concerning Japanese in this country. Mrs. Mittwer is a former resident of Los Angeles, from where she was evacuated to the Santa Anita Assembly Center. After spending four and one-half months at Santa Anita she was moved to Heart Mountain. Before Pearl Harbor she was a frequent contributor to the English section of Japanese newspapers. She has three brothers, all of whom have relocated, all of whom are of draft age, and all of whom expect to enter some branch of the armed forces soon. Mrs. Mittwer is married and the mother of two small children.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Denver, Colorado. 5/13/44

Volume 78, Section H, WRA no. -211

Henry Omachi at the transit, a young student of engineering from the Tule Lake Center, now relocated in Cleveland and employed by the National Surveys Company, is here seen at work on the water front with Joe Semanisin, a Caucasian.

Photographer: Mace, Charles E.

Cleveland, Ohio. 8/18/43

Volume 78, Section H, WRA no. -217

Democracy at Work. Abe Hagiwara, a relocatee from the Minidoka Relocation Center and a former resident of Alaska prior to our entrance into the war, is now employed at the Y.M.C.A. in Cleveland as a boys' work secretary. Hagiwara's mother is still in the Minidoka Center and his wife works as a typist in the County Library in Cleveland. He is shown here surrounded by admiring Cleveland youngsters representing nine nationalities.

Photographer: Mace, Charles E.

Cleveland, Ohio. 8/19/43

Volume 78, Section H, WRA no. -32

Another freedom of considerable importance to the young feminine mind in America is the freedom to shop for and wear pretty clothes. These two Nisei girls, evacuees from the west coast and recently relocated from the relocation center at Granada, Colorado, are again enjoying that privilege. They are shown here sporting their new swim suits on a Chicago beach. Both girls are employed as secretaries in the city. They are, standing, Sueko Kiguche; seated, Suisie Hattori.

Photographer: Mace, Charles E.

Chicago, Illinois. 8/13/42

Volume 78, Section G, WRA no. -357

Ayako Yoshii (left), and Allyce Hirabayashi, are interviewed by Nurse Maxine Davis at the American Red Cross Blood Donor Center, 117 15th Street, after appearing at the Center with a dozen Japanese-American women and several men to register as blood donors as a protest against atrocities perpetrated upon American prisoners of war in the Philippines by Japanese troops. Miss Hirabayashi, whose home formerly was in Salinas, California, is a relocated evacuee from the War Relocation Center at Poston, Arizona. Miss Yoshii, a former resident of Los Angeles, California, is a relocatee from the War Relocation Center at Amache, Colorado.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Denver, Colorado. 2/3/44

Volume 78, Section I, WRA no. -447

Miss Mildred Sasaki, formerly of Tule Lake Relocation Center, is shown at her work in the Day Care Nursery and School. This school is located in an old store building to which working mothers bring their children for day care and to which boys and girls of elementary school grades come for instruction. This is an effort to aid in the prevention of delinquency. Miss Sasaki is a specialist in the nursery and kindergarten work and her work is much appreciated here. She is shown telling stories and doing finger work with a few of the smaller children who had become uneasy since it is time for their mothers to come and get them. Miss Sasaki's acceptance by the Board of Education and her special abilities have helped interpret the high standards of Japanese Americans to Cincinnati.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Cincinnati, Ohio. 9/12/44

Volume 78, Section H, WRA no. -581

Dora Nakamura helps her mother in the nurses' home at St. Anthony's Hospital, Rockford, Illinois. One of their duties is the upkeep of the linen room. In this picture, Mrs. Nakamura is placing nurses uniforms into the individual compartments, while her daughter, Dora, stands ready with more clean uniforms to go into other compartments. The Nakamuras, prior to evacuation, lived at Santa Cruz, California, and lived first at the Tule Lake Relocation Center and later at the Amache center. They came to Rockford in October, 1943.

Photographer: Mace, Charles E.

Rockford, Illinois. 2/4/44

Volume 78, Section I, WRA no. -626

Fed Toguri, owner, Masachi Hori, who works for Fred, and June Toguri, Fred's sister, are shown at the front counter in Mr. Toguri's Food Shop at 1012 North Clark Street, Chicago. Fred and June Toguri and Masachi Hori all came to Chicago from Gila River Relocation Center. Fred Toguri operated a grocery store in Los Angeles prior to evacuation. He also operates a rooming house two floors above the Food Shop and another one close by in the neighborhood.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 9/19/44

Volume 78, Section I, WRA no. -633

Kay Sunahara, Akira Taniguchi, and Lillian Funakubo, Nisei boarders, are pictured on the front steps of the pleasant boarding house operated by Mr. and Mrs. Toyone Maeda, who are standing behind their tenants. The boarding house has accommodations for 14 persons. All of the Maedas' tenants at present are resettlers. Mr. and Mrs. Maeda came to Chicago from Manzanar by way of Utah, where they operated a farm at Hannibal, Utah, for about a year after leaving the center. Prior to evacuation they were hog raisers at Buena Park, California. One of their two sons, Jimmy, is attending high school in Chicago, and their other son, Sam, is attending a chick sexing school in Pennsylvania. In addition to their boarding house, the Maedas have a small trucking business in Chicago.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Chicago, Illinois. 9/19/44

Volume 78, Section I, WRA no. -720

The Delgado Museum of Art. This museum is situated near one entrance to the New Orleans City Park.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

New Orleans, Louisiana. 1/13/45

Volume 78, Section I, WRA no. -723

Swans and ducks are common in the City Park. These pictures were taken on the 13th day of January, 1945. On that day several people were rowing boats and paddling canoes in the park lagoons. The temperature was 77 degrees.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

New Orleans, Louisiana. 1/13/45

Volume 78, Section E, WRA no. -869

Kenneth Sugioka, young Nisei, at work on a precision lathe in the defense plant of the Hathaway Instrument Company in Denver, Colorado. Young Kenneth, a former orchardist, was born and raised in Hollister, California, where he took an active part in church and community activities, was a mate (adult leader) of a troop of Sea Scouts, and pursued a hobby of metal working. A voluntary evacuee, he moved to Denver and found a place where his talents as a precision machinist could be directly employed in the manufacture of war materials.

Photographer: Parker, Tom

Denver, Colorado. 5/5/43

Volume 78, Section B, WRA no. -905

Sightseeing in Washington, D.C. Harrio Najima, from Tule Lake Relocation Center, Kiyoka Nagai from Jerome Center, Jane Oi from Granada, Sally Tsujimoto from Manzanar, and Paul Matsuki from Central Utah Project visit the Lincoln Memorial. They are all working for the War Relocation Authority.

Photographer: Van Tassel, Gretchen

"Washington, D.C.", . 10/14/43

Volume 78, Section B, WRA no. -907

Kiyoko Nagai from Jerome, Harrio Najima from Tule Lake, Paul Matsuki from Central Utah, Sally Tsujimoto from Manzanar, and Jane Oi from Granada visit the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. They are all working in that city for the War Relocation Authority.

Photographer: Van Tassel, Gretchen

"Washington, D.C.", . 10/14/43

Volume 78, Section B, WRA no. -908

Feeding pigeons in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. are Jane Oi from Granada Relocation Center, Harrio Najima from Tule Lake, and Sally Tsujimoto from Manzanar. They are all three working for the War Relocation Authority. Sally's husband is a member of the Japanese American Combat Team in training at Camp Shelby.

Photographer: Van Tassel, Gretchen

"Washington, D.C.", . 10/14/43

Volume 78, Section B, WRA no. -912

Jane Oi and Sally Tsujimoto show privates Katsujii Nakamoto and Harold Matsumura the Capitol in Washington. Jane, who spent nearly a year at Granada, and Sally, from Manzanar, are both working as secretaries for the War Relocation Authority. Katsujii and Harold are members of the Japanese American Combat Team, training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi.

Photographer: Van Tassel, Gretchen

"Washington, D.C.", . 10/14/43

Volume 78, Section E, WRA no. -934

Ruth Nishi, 21, an evacuee from Poston who is now working for the Bloomfield Mfg. Co., Chicago, where she skillfully operates a turret lathe making parts for gas values. Her former home was in Berkeley, California, where her father owned a fruit and vegetable market.

Photographer: Parker, Tom

Chicago, Illinois. 8/?/43

Volume 78, Section E, WRA no. -954

When all persons of Japanese ancestry were evacuated from the west coast, George Tayota left a fruit stand in Oakland, California. He stayed in the Central Utah Relocation Center until a job was offered him in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Three weeks behind the bar of a hotel restaurant, and George had mastered the art of the cocktail shaker and the short beer. A popular barkeep, he plans to bring the rest of his family from Topaz to Bridgeport.

Photographer: Parker, Tom

Bridgeport, Connecticut. 9/16/43

Volume 78, Section E, WRA no. -976

Staff Sergeant Ben Kuroki of the United States Army Eighth Air Forces. Sgt. Kuroki has spent a year and a half in the European war theatre. As a gunner on a Liberator, he participated in thirty one bombing missions over Germany, Nazi occupied Europe and Africa. His squadron helped chase Rommel from Africa, assisted in the landings on Sicily and the Italian mainland. He was a part of the first American bombing of Rome, and was on the all important Ploetsi oil field raid in Romania. He holds the Distinguished Flying Cross with two Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Air Medal with four Oak Leaf Clusters. Ben is 29, the son of a Nebraska farmer. The family lives at Hershey, Nebraska, where Ben formerly helped his father on the farm.

Photographer: Parker, Tom

Denver, Colorado. 1/3/44

Volume 82, Section B, WRA no. -637

Four evacuee boys and one girl are employed in the cafeteria at the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio. One of the boys, John Takekawa, is pictured above, and the others are Paul Kaseguma, Sam Shoji, and Seichi Yasutaka. The latter's sister, May, works in the cafeteria as cashier. They are all from the Minidoka center, and before evacuation lived in Seattle. The boys make $77 a month, plus two meals a day, plus free tuition for six hours of college courses. They have rooms at a fraternity house near the campus, and all are looking forward to enrolling at the University this fall. More than 600 soldiers are taking special courses at the University during the summer session.

Cincinnati, Ohio. 6/?/43

Volume 82, Section B, WRA no. -638

After living in crude barracks for many months, these relocated Japanese-American find real pleasure in having a home of their own again. Three families share this big house in one of the residential districts in Cincinnati, Ohio. Seated, left to right, are Mrs. Charles Hisatomi, son Nicky, Mrs. Henry Watanabe, and Mr. Hisatomi. Standing is Mr. Watanabe with his daughter, Barbara. Both families are from the Heart Mountain Relocation Center. Mr. and Mrs. Hisatomi arrived in Cincinnati late in June and were staying at the house until they could find other accommodations. The two families not shown on the picture, but who live with the Wantanabes, are Dr. and Mrs. George Abe who have lived in Cincinnati for the past five years, and Mr. and Mrs. Sho Iino of Los Angeles, who came out prior to evacuation.

Cincinnati, Ohio. 6/?/43

Volume 82, Section B, WRA no. -639

Sam Tamura trims a hedge on the eight-acre estate of his employer in the outskirts of Cincinnati, Ohio, while his nine-year-old son, Eddie, looks on. Sam takes care of the grounds and garden, and Mrs. Tamura works in the house. The Tamuras came to the United States in 1916, operated a vineyard near Sacramento before evacuation, and were one of the first Issei families to leave the Jerome, Arkansas, Relocation Center for outside jobs. Two other sons joined them in Cincinnati in June with the intention of finding jobs as automobile mechanics.

Cincinnati, Ohio. 6/?/43

Volume 82, Section B, WRA no. -640

One of the leading newspaper columnists in Cincinnati, Ohio, Alfred Segal, leads a discussion group of relocated Japanese-Americans at the American Friends' hostel in Cincinnati. Segal, who writes under the pen-name of Cincinnatus, has done much to promote the friendly reception which evacuees are getting in the Cincinnati area. He is shown seated in the rocking chair, and immediately behind him to the right are Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Brinton, co-managers of the hostel. The hostel has been in operation since April and offers temporary living accommodations at low cost until evacuees and their families find more permanent quarters.

Cincinnati, Ohio. 6/?/43

Volume 82, Section B, WRA no. -641

Miss May Yasutake, formerly of the Minidoka Relocation Center, left early in June this year to accept a job as cashier at the cafeteria of the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her brother, Seichi, and three other boys from the Minidoka Center also work as helpers in the cafeteria. May's roommate is a Caucasian girl who is teaching at the University during the summer. May, herself, taught in one of the nursery schools at the Minidoka Center, and also worked as a nurse's aide in the hospital there. Her father was an interpreter for the U.S. Immigration Service before evacuation.

Cincinnati, Ohio. 6/?/43

Volume 82, Section B, WRA no. -642

The Mount Auburn Presbyterian Church at Cincinnati, Ohio, welcomes the children of relocated Japanese-Americans at the daily vacation Bible school held in the church during the summer. In the group pictured above are Tomi Takao, Lynn Matsumoto, and the five children of Captain and Mrs. Walter Tsukamoto, Dian, David, Doris, Dick and Donald. Mrs. Tsukamoto (standing in back, second from the left) is staying in Cincinnati with the children, while her husband is stationed as an instructor in the Army language school at Camp Savage, Minnesota.

Cincinnati, Ohio. 6/?/43

Volume 83, Section H, WRA no. -217

Democracy at Work. Abe Hagiwara, a relocatee from the Minidoka Relocation Center and a former resident of Alaska prior to our entrance into the war, is now employed at the Y.M.C.A. in Cleveland as a boys' work secretary. Hagiwara's mother is still in the Minidoka Center and his wife works as a typist in the County library in Cleveland. He is shown here surrounded by admiring Cleveland youngsters representing nine nationalities.

Photographer: Mace, Charles E.

Cleveland, Ohio. 8/19/43

Volume AX1, Section K, WRA no. -114

The camera man caught Mr. and Mrs. Harry Iwagaki in a happy mood at their San Jose home, 514 Boynton Avenue, San Jose, and well they might be. For the day after their son, Sgt. Kenneth Iwagaki, arrived home on one of those furloughs which means he is about to go overseas. Their son-in-law, Captain James Higushi, dropped in on them for a thirty day furlough enroute from Berlin to Tokyo. Captain James is a medical officer attached to a Caucasian outfit now being deployed to the Pacific. He was in Europe for more than two years and went through the entire European campaign. Mrs. Amy Higushi, wife of the Captain, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Iwagaki. A second son of the Iwagakis, Sgt. Duncan Iwagaki, recently embarked from the east coast for the European theater. The Iwagakis evacuated to Heart Mountain and they relocated temporarily at Brighton, Colorado. They returned to their prune orchard here in January of this year, one of the pioneer families of relocation. Mrs. Higushi is residing with her parents while her husband is with the armed forces.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

San Jose, California. 7/11/45

Volume AX1, Section K, WRA no. -15

A foreman for the Roscoe Zukerman farm at Camp #21, Mandeville Island, Stockton, California, is George Hisaka, shown here with a handful of prospective Grade A Delta potatoes. George returned from the Rohwer Relocation Center early in April with his wife, Margie, his son, Mervyn, and two daughters, Jean and Judith.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Stockton, California. 6/30/45

Volume AX1, Section I, WRA no. -447

Miss Mildred Sasaki, formerly of Tule Lake Relocation Center, is shown at her work in the Day Care Nursery and School. This school is located in an old store building to which working mothers bring their children for day care and to which boys and girls of elementary school grades come for instruction. This is an effort to aid in the prevention of delinquency. Miss Sasaki is a specialist in the nursery and kindergarten work and her work is much appreciated here. She is shown telling stories and doing finger work with a few of the smaller children who had become uneasy since it is time for their mothers to come and get them. Miss Sasaki's acceptance by the Board of Education and her special abilities have helped interpret the high standards of Japanese Americans to Cincinnati.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Cincinnati, Ohio. 9/13/44

Volume AX1, Section I, WRA no. -587

Mr. Hiromu Komori (middle), formerly of Pasadena and Gila River Center, and Mr. Hitoshi Fukui, formerly of Los Angeles and Heart Mountain, are shown here operating a Logan lathe in company with a fellow employee, Leonard Peer, at the Aetna Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Komori is a veteran of World War I, was employed in California as a gardener, and until his present job has never done machine shop work. According to his employer, he is already one of the outstanding workers in the plant. Mr. Fukui owned a funeral parlor in California, from 1919 to 1942, and has never done machine shop work prior to his present job. I am very happy in my job and have gained considerable weight since I began work, said Mr. Fukui. His employer states Mr. Fukui is catching on rapidly and is a man who attends to business. The Aetna Manufacturing Company is one of Cleveland's smaller war plants. Mr. Fukui is also a veteran of World War I.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Cleveland, Ohio. 9/?/44

Volume AX1, Section I, WRA no. -603

Mrs. Toshie Kadowaki (left), formerly of Los Angeles, California, and Colorado River, and Mrs. Lillian Matsumura (right), formerly of Los Angeles, California, and Gila River, are shown here, together with Miss Ruth Pesuit, receptionist, and Mr. Sol Fisher, owner of the Fisher Beauty Shoppe. Mr. Fisher is highly pleased with the two girls. It is amazing to me, he says; we have operators who have been here a number of years and yet a great many of our customers refuse to have anyone work on their heads but Mrs. Matsumura and Mrs. Kadowaki. They are really excellent operators.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Cleveland, Ohio. 9/?/44

Volume AX1, Section G, WRA no. -618

Dillon Myer, Director of the War Relocation Authority, looking over the Heart Mountain Sentinel with several evacuees from Heart Mountain who are now working in Civil Service jobs in Washington, D.C. Eiko Narita (left) has been working for the government since November 1943 as a stenographer with the Office of Price Administration. She is living with a Caucasian family who, she claims, treat her like one of the family. She is working very hard on her job but still has time to meet a lot of people and have a good time. Joan Ishiyama has been working for WRA since March 1943. She has an apartment with another WRA employee. Joan spends two nights a week doing Red Cross work. Her brother is working in New York City and has recently rented a house in the suburbs where he hopes his parents will join him and his wife. John Kitasaka (right) is in the Japanese Editorial section of the Federal Communications Commission. When John first came to Washington in February, he lived in a rooming house, but since then he and a friend of his have found an apartment.

Photographer: Van Tassel, Gretchen

"Washington, D.C.", . 9/?/44

Volume AX1, Section I, WRA no. -639

Mr. Bill Hosokawa and family are shown on the lawn before the home which they purchased last August. With him are his wife, Alice, and baby, Susan. Mrs. Tora Miyake, mother of Mrs. Hosokawa, lives with them as does their young son, Michael, aged 4, who was not present for this picture. Mr. Hosokawa is well-known throughout the country for his editorial writings and is employed on the editorial copy desk of the Des Moines Register and Tribune. He is also the founder of the Heart Mountain Sentinel of the Heart Mountain Relocation Center in Wyoming, and prior to the outbreak of the war was headed for a brilliant career in the Far East.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 9/?/44

Volume AX1, Section I, WRA no. -665

Miss Ruth Yakel, Mrs. Yukino Kawamura and Mrs. Cora Gilbert are shown at their work in the Nutrition Department of the Iowa Methodist Hospital preparing dessert for patients. Miss Yakel is the therapeutical dietitian and Mrs. Gilbert is the cafeteria's assistant. Mrs. Kawamura has been in this department of the hospital for a little over a month. She relocated to Des Moines from Gila River Relocation Center, Rivers, Arizona, and is living at 726 West 15th Street in Des Moines with her son, George, who is attending West High School.

Photographer: Iwasaki, Hikaru

Des Moines, Iowa. 9/?/44

 

Series 14: Preevacuation

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-1

Mr. and Mrs. K. Iseri have closed their drugstore in preparation for the forthcoming evacuation from Little Tokyo in Los Angeles.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

Los Angeles, California. 4/11/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-216

Baggage belonging to evacuees of Japanese ancestry has been brought to the park in the center of town ready to be trucked to the Salinas Assembly Center, where evacuees from this district will await transfer to a War Relocation Authority center to spend the duration.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

Salinas, California. 3/31/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-234

Quarters of evacuees of Japanese descent at Assembly Center before the streets were graded. These evacuees will be transferred later to a War Relocation Authority center.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

Salinas, California. 3/31/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-237

Members of two evacuee families of Japanese descent meet at this Assembly Center located on the Salinas Rodeo Grounds. These people will be transferred later to a War Relocation Authority center.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

Salinas, California. 3/31/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-240

Evacuees of Japanese ancestry boarding a bus which will take them to the Santa Anita Assembly Center. They will later be transferred to a War Relocation Authority Center to spend the duration.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

Salinas, California. 3/31/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-241

Evacuees of Japanese ancestry boarding a bus which will take them to the Santa Anita Assembly Center. They will later be transferred to a War Relocation Authority Center to spend the duration.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

Salinas, California. 3/31/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-249

Baggage is being assembled to be taken by truck to the Salinas Assembly center where evacuees from this area will await transfer to a War Relocation Authority center for the duration.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

Salinas, California. 3/31/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-264

Residents of Japanese ancestry register in preparation for the forthcoming evacuation.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

San Francisco, California. 4/27/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-272

Residents of Japanese ancestry registering prior to evacuation. Evacuees are housed temporarily at assembly points and later transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

San Francisco, California. 4/27/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-275

Residents of Japanese ancestry are being registered prior to their evacuation to assembly centers from where they will later be transferred to War Relocation Authority centers to spend the duration.

San Francisco, California. 4/27/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-276

Residents of Japanese ancestry are being registered prior to their evacuation to assembly centers from where they will later be transferred to War Relocation Authority centers to spend the duration.

San Francisco, California. 4/27/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-3

Evidences of the forthcoming evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

San Francisco, California. 3/29/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-35

Following evacuation orders, this store, at 13th and Franklin Streets, was closed. The owner, a University of California graduate of Japanese descent, placed the I AM AN AMERICAN sign on the store front on December 8, the day after Pearl Harbor. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Oakland, California. 3/13/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-36

Headlines of newspapers, in stand at 14th and Broadway, presaged on February 27, 1942, the evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry from military areas. On February 19, President Roosevelt delegated to the Secretary of War power to exclude any person, alien, or citizen, from any area which might be required, on the grounds of military necessity. Evacuees of Japanese descent will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Oakland, California. 2/27/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-37

Interior view of Japanese American Citizens League headquarters. A Japanese language school was conducted in this building. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 4/7/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-38

As Bataan fell, as recorded in these newspapers of April 9, 1942, evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry already was under way in California. This newsstand was pictured at a corner drugstore in a neighborhood in which such residents lived. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Hayward, California. 4/9/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-41

Saturday afternoon shoppers reading order directing evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry. This store on Grant Avenue in Chinatown was vacated by an art dealer of Japanese descent. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/17/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-42

Entrance to a restaurant vacated by a proprietor of Japanese descent prior to evacuation. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/13/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-43

As evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry progressed in April 1942, this sign (above), advertising a swimming pool, was posted in many San Francisco districts. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/13/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-45

Farm house in rural section where farmers of Japanese ancestry raised truck garden crops. Evacuees from this and other military areas will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/18/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-46

Japanese farm. These people are farm owners. The family are preparing to evacuate and expect the order at any time. They have attended their crop up to the time when the Caucasian tenants move in. Some of their furniture is seen stacked along side of house. Note the clean condition of these fields.

Centerville, California. 4/18/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-47

Transplanting tomato plants in a section where, before evacuation, ranches were operated by farmers of Japanese ancestry. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 3/27/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-48

Greenhouse on nursery operated, before evacuation, by horticultural experts of Japanese ancestry. Many of the Nisei (born in this country) attended leading agricultural colleges such as that at Cornell. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Leandro, California. 4/5/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-49

Harvesting cauliflower on a ranch near Centerville on April 9, 1942, while evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry was in progress. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 4/9/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-5

Evacuees of Japanese ancestry waiting for the train which will take them to an assembly center from where they later will be transferred to a War Relocation Authority center to spend the duration.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

San Pedro, California. 4/5/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-50

Packing cauliflower on a ranch near Centerville, Calif., on April 9, 1942, while evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry was in progress. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 4/9/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-500

As a safeguard for health, evacuees of Japanese descent were inoculated as they registered for evacuation at 2031 Bush Street. Nurses and doctors, also of Japanese ancestry, administered inoculations. Evacuees were later transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/20/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-501

As a safeguard for health, evacuees of Japanese descent were inoculated as they registered for evacuation at 2031 Bush Street. Nurses and doctors, also of Japanese ancestry, administered inoculations. Children were given special attention. Evacuees were later transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/20/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-502

As a safeguard for health, evacuees of Japanese descent were inoculated as they registered for evacuation at 2031 Bush Street. Nurses and doctors, also of Japanese ancestry, administered inoculations. Children were given special attention. Evacuees were later transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/20/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-503

As a safeguard for health, evacuees of Japanese descent were inoculated as they registered for evacuation at 2031 Bush Street. Nurses and doctors, also of Japanese ancestry, administered inoculations. Evacuees were later transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/20/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-504

As a safeguard for health, evacuees of Japanese descent were inoculated as they registered for evacuation at 2031 Bush Street. Nurses and doctors, also of Japanese ancestry, administered inoculations. Children were given special attention. Evacuees were later transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/20/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-506

Scene in orchard of a 20-acre farm in Santa Clara County before the operators were evacuated to assembly centers. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry are being transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/18/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-507

Scene in orchard of a 20-acre farm in Santa Clara County before the operators were evacuated to assembly centers. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry are being transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/18/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-508

In a final harvest prior to evacuation, mother and daughter wash white radishes on a 20-acre farm in Santa Clara County, California. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/18/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-509

In a final harvest prior to evacuation, mother and daughter wash white radishes on a 20-acre farm in Santa Clara County, California. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/18/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-51

Icing cauliflower in refrigerator car for shipment to eastern markets, prior to evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry from this farming section. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 4/9/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-510

Families of two Shinto priests who were interned on December 8, 1941, immediately upon declaration of war. The mother, at right, has nine American-born children and has been in the United States ten years. The mother on the left has been in this country 6 years, and neither speaks English. These evacuees and others will be leaving for the assembly center within a few days, and later transferred to WRA centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-511

Japanese mother, wife of interned Shinto priest, with youngest of her nine children who are American born. She has been in the United States ten years and does not speak English. Within a few days residents of Japanese ancestry will be evacuated to assembly centers and later transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-512

Two friends play final game while awaiting evacuation. Evacuees of Japanese descent are being housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-513

Two friends play final game while awaiting evacuation. Evacuees of Japanese descent are being housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-52

Packing crates of cauliflower in refrigerator car for shipment to eastern markets, prior to evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry from this rural area. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 4/9/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-53

Henry T. Futamachi (left), superintendent of a 1300-acre mechanized ranch, discusses agricultural problems with the ranch owner, John B. MacKinlay. Before evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry, Futamachi, 45, was paid $4,000 a year and bonuses. He came to this country 28 years ago with his father. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Stockton, California. 4/10/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-54

On this 1300-acre farm which, before evacuation, was worked and managed by persons of Japanese ancestry, tractors and other mechanized equipment were used intensively. Evacuees from rural and other sections in military areas will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Stockton, California. 4/10/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-55

So-called stoop laborers are shown weeding a celery field. Many persons of Japanese ancestry worked at this type of field labor before they were evacuated from military areas. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Stockton, California. 4/10/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-56

So-called stoop laborer is shown weeding a celery field. Many persons of Japanese ancestry worked at this type of field labor before they were evacuated from military areas. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Stockton, California. 4/10/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-567

Husbands of these two women are being held as dangerous enemy aliens. Wives and children were evacuated with other persons of Japanese ancestry, and will spend the duration at War Relocation Authority centers.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-57

Cutting potato seed on an industrialized farm where, before evacuation, all work was done by persons of Japanese ancestry. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Stockton, California. 4/10/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-58

Cutting potato seed on an industrialized farm where, before evacuation, all work was done by persons of Japanese ancestry. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Stockton, California. 4/10/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-59

Prior to evacuation, members of the Shibuya family seeding a field on ranch which they own. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California.

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-60

Members of the Shibuya family are pictured at their home before evacuation. The father and the mother were born in Japan and came to this country in 1904. At that time the father had $60 in cash and a basket of clothes. He later built a prosperous business of raising select varieties of chrysanthemums, which he shipped to eastern markets under his own trade name. Six children in the family were born in the United States. The four older children attended leading California universities. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/18/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-61

Mrs. Dave Tatsuno prepares a final meal at 2625 Buchanan Street, prior to evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry. She and her husband, a University of California graduate, both were born in this country. Evacuees of Japanese descent will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/13/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-62

Dave Tatsuno re-reads notes he compiled while he was a student at the University of California, where he was graduated in 1936. Tatsuno, with his two-year-old son at his side, is packing his possessions at 2625 Buchanan Street, prior to evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry. Evacuees will be housed at War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/13/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-63

Mr. Tatsuno pictured in his San Francisco dry goods store prior to evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry. He was in the goods business for 40 years in San Francisco. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/4/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-64

Shortly before evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry from the Post and Buchanan Streets neighborhood, San Francisco. This dry goods store is closing out its merchandise. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/4/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-65

Customers buy merchandise in a store operated by a proprietor of Japanese ancestry, during a pre-evacuation sale. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/4/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-66

With the owner scheduled to be evacuated, a store front is boarded on Post Street, San Francisco. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/7/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-67

View of business district on Post Street in a neighborhood occupied by residents of Japanese ancestry, before evacuation. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/7/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-68

This restaurant, named Nisei after second-generation children born in this country to Japanese immigrants, was closed prior to evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry; and, according to sign in the window, was scheduled to re-open under new management. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/7/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-69

While American troops were going in action on far-flung fronts, residents of Japanese ancestry were being evacuated from this neighborhood on Post Street. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/7/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-70

The moving van backs up to the curb to load possessions of residents of Japanese ancestry who are being evacuated from this flat building on Post Street. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/7/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-71

Members of the Japanese Independent Congregational Church attend Easter services prior to evacuation. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Oakland, California. 4/5/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-72

Lunch hour at the Raphael Weill Public School, Geary and Buchanan Streets, in the so-called international section. Many children of Japanese ancestry were evacuated with their parents from this neighborhood. Educational facilities will be established at War Relocation Authority centers where evacuees will spend the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/17/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-73

Pals at Raphael Weill Public School, Geary and Buchanan Streets. Yuichi Sumi (left), of Japanese ancestry, and Tommy Wong, of Chinese descent, on one of the last days before evacuation. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/20/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-74

Many evacuated children attended Raphael Weill Public School, Geary and Buchanan Streets. One of the pupils was Rachel Karumi (above). Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/20/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-75

Many evacuated children attended Raphael Weill Public School, Geary and Buchanan Streets. Above is a lunch hour scene prior to evacuation. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/16/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-78

Flag of allegiance pledge at Raphael Weill Public School, Geary and Buchanan Streets. Children in families of Japanese ancestry were evacuated with their parents and will be housed for the duration in War Relocation Authority centers where facilities will be provided for them to continue their education.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/20/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-79

A business man of Japanese descent confers with a representative of the Federal Reserve Bank at Wartime Civil Control Administration station to arrange disposition of his financial affairs prior to evacuation. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/4/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-8

Evacuees of Japanese ancestry are being vaccinated by fellow evacuees upon arrival at the assembly centers.

Photographer: Albers, Clem

Arcadia, California. 4/?/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-80

Father and son register for evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/4/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-81

Residents of Japanese ancestry file forms containing personal data, two days before evacuation, at Wartime Civil Control Administration stations. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/4/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-82

Residents of Japanese ancestry file forms containing personal data, two days before evacuation, at Wartime Civil Control Administration stations. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/4/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-83

Early comers arrive with personal effects at 2020 Van Ness Avenue as part of the contingent of 664 residents of Japanese ancestry, first to be evacuated from San Francisco on April 6, 1942. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-84

An early comer arrives with personal effects at 2020 Van Ness Avenue as part of the contingent of 664 residents of Japanese ancestry, first to be evacuated from San Francisco on April 6, 1942. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-85

Early comers arrive with personal effects at 2020 Van Ness Avenue as part of the contingent of 664 residents of Japanese ancestry, first to be evacuated from San Francisco on April 6, 1942. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-86

An early comer arrives with personal effects at 2020 Van Ness Avenue as part of the contingent of 664 residents of Japanese ancestry, first to be evacuated from San Francisco on April 6, 1942. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-87

An early comer arrives with personal effects at 2020 Van Ness Avenue as part of the contingent of 664 residents of Japanese ancestry, first to be evacuated from San Francisco on April 6, 1942. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-88

Early comers arrive with personal effects at 2020 Van Ness Avenue as part of the contingent of 664 residents of Japanese ancestry, first to be evacuated from San Francisco on April 6, 1942. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-89

An early comer arrives with personal effects at 2020 Van Ness Avenue as part of the contingent of 664 residents of Japanese ancestry, first to be evacuated from San Francisco on April 6, 1942. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-90

View of Wartime Civil Control Administration station at 2020 Van Ness Avenue on April 6, 1942, when first group, of 664 persons of Japanese ancestry, was evacuated from San Francisco. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-91

With baggage stacked, young residents of Japanese ancestry await bus at Wartime Civil Control Administration station, 2020 Van Ness Avenue, as part of first group of 664 to be evacuated from San Francisco on April 6, 1942. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-93

The family unit is kept intact in various phases of evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry. Above is a view at Wartime Civil Control Administration station, 2020 Van Ness Avenue, on April 6, 1942, when first group of 664 was evacuated from San Francisco. The family unit likewise is preserved at War Relocation Authority centers where evacuees will spend the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-94

The family unit is kept intact in various phases of evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry. Above is a view at Wartime Civil Control Administration station, 2020 Van Ness Avenue, on April 6, 1942, when first group of 664 was evacuated from San Francisco. The family unit likewise is preserved at War Relocation Authority centers where evacuees will spend the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-95

Just about to step into the bus for the Assembly Center.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 56, Section G, WRA no. A-96

The family unit is kept intact in various phases of evacuation of persons of Japanese ancestry. Above is a view at Wartime Civil Control Administration station, 2020 Van Ness Avenue, on April 6, 1942, when first group of 664 was evacuated from San Francisco. The family unit likewise is preserved at War Relocation Authority centers where evacuees will spend the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/6/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-514

In response to the Army's Exclusion Order No. 20, residents of Japanese ancestry appear at Civil Control Station at 2031 Bush Street for registration. The evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-515

In response to the Army's Exclusion Order No. 20, residents of Japanese ancestry appear at Civil Control Station at 2031 Bush Street, for registration. The evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-516

In response to the Army's Exclusion Order No. 20, residents of Japanese ancestry appear at Civil Control Station at 2031 Bush Street, for registration. The evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-517

In response to the Army's Exclusion Order No. 20, residents of Japanese ancestry appear at Civil Control Station at 2031 Bush Street, for registration. The evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-518

In response to the Army's Exclusion Order No. 20, residents of Japanese ancestry appear at Civil Control Station at 2031 Bush Street, for registration. The evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-519

A pre-evacuation barbecue on Mitarai farm in Santa Clara County, California. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/26/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-520

A pre-evacuation barbecue on a farm in Santa Clara County, California. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/26/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-521

Young farmer, graduate of College of Agriculture, University of California, class of 1941. After graduation he leased 200 acres for truck gardening. He will soon be on his way to an assembly center with other residents of Japanese ancestry. Later they will be transferred to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Niles, California. 4/18/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-522

Farewell letter posted in show window of T. Z. Shiota, importer in San Francisco's Chinatown, prior to evacuation of residents of Japanese ancestry. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/?/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-523

Letter of appreciation posted in show window of Pacific Dry Goods Company, 434-440 Grant Avenue, in San Francisco's Chinatown. Evacuees of Japanese descent will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/?/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-524

Stenographer for Japanese American Citizens League of Mr. Eden township. Helps the farmers of the vicinity to close out their affairs before evacuation.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 4/9/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-525

Evacuees of Japanese descent among a contingent of 664, first to be removed from San Francisco, awaiting buses at 2020 Van Ness Avenue to transport them to Santa Anita Park assembly center at Arcadia, California. Evacuees are transported later to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/16/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-526

A young evacuee arrives at 2020 Van Ness Avenue, meeting place of first contingent to be removed from San Francisco to Santa Anita Park assembly center at Arcadia, California. Evacuees will be transferred later to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/16/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-527

Japanese berry farm, transferred to a Yugoslavian who came to the United States in 1933. The berry crop on this farm last year was worth about $5,000. It was left in perfect condition.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 4/18/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-528

Yugoslavian farmer is taking over berry farm formerly operated by residents of Japanese ancestry, who are being sent to assembly points and later to be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Centerville, California. 4/18/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-529

Japanese family heads and persons living alone form a line outside Civil Control station located in the Japanese American Citizens League Auditorium at 2031 Bush Street, to appear for processing in response to Civilian Exclusion Order No. 20.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-530

Japanese family heads and persons living alone form a line outside Civil Control station located in the Japanese American Citizens League Auditorium at 2031 Bush Street, to appear for processing in response to Civilian Exclusion Order No. 20.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-531

Japanese family heads and persons living alone form a line outside Civil Control station located in the Japanese American Citizens League Auditorium at 2031 Bush Street, to appear for processing in response to Civilian Exclusion Order No. 20.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

San Francisco, California. 4/25/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-532

Grandmother and youngest of 13 grandchildren photographed during a pre-evacuation barbecue on a ranch in Santa Clara County, California. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry will be transferred later to War Relocation Authority centers for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/26/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-533

Grandfather of 64 who came to the United States from Japan at the age of 19. He now lives with his daughter and son-in-law, Henry Mitarai, a prosperous farm operator, but will soon be evacuated to an assembly point and later transferred to a War Relocation center for the duration.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/26/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-534

Grandfather of 64 who came to the United States from Japan at the age of 19. He now lives with his daughter and son-in-law, Henry Mitarai, a prosperous farm operator, but will soon be evacuated to an assembly point and later transferred to a War Relocation center for the duration. He advised his daughter that now is the time to prove their loyalty to this country.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/26/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-535

Grandfather of 64 who came to the United States from Japan at the age of 19. He now lives with his daughter and son-in-law, a prosperous farm operator, but will soon be evacuated to an assembly point and later transferred to a War Relocation center for the duration. He advised his daughter that now is the time to prove their loyalty to this country.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/26/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-536

Grandfather of 64 who came to the United States from Japan at the age of 19. He now lives with his daughter and son-in-law, a prosperous farm operator, but will soon be evacuated to an assembly point and later transferred to a War Relocation center for the duration. He advised his daughter that now is the time to prove their loyalty to this country.

Photographer: Lange, Dorothea

Mountain View, California. 4/26/42

Volume 57, Section G, WRA no. A-537

Mrs. Shibuya of the successfully established family who came to this country in 1904 with her husband who had $60.00 in cash and a basket of clothes. Later they built a prosperous business of raising select varieties of chrysanthemums for Eastern