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Table of contents What's This?

Container List

 

Photographs

 

Theatres

Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Physical Description: Perspective sketch.
Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Foyer.
Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Ladies' powder room.
Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Auditorium entrance.
Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Auditorium.
Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Lobby doors and box office.
Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Tower at night.
Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Facade.
Box 1, Folder 1

Academy Theatre. 1939 - Inglewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Art glass panel.
Box 1, Folder 2

Admiral Theatre. 1939-1940 - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Facade.
Box 1, Folder 2

Admiral Theatre. 1939-1940 - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Kako
Physical Description: Perspective sketch.
Box 1, Folder 3

Alex Theatre. 1940 - Glendale

Physical Description: Facade, before remodel.
Box 1, Folder 3

Alex Theatre. 1940 - Glendale

Creator/Collector: Nate Singer
Physical Description: Facade, after remodel.
Box 1, Folder 4

Alhambra Theatre

Physical Description: 2 renderings Hoffman-Luckhaus.
Box 1, Folder 5

Alpha Theatre

Creator/Collector: E.P. Company photo
Physical Description: No location-prototype. 1 rendering.
Box 1, Folder 6

Alvarado Theatre. 1936 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Facade before remodel.
Box 1, Folder 6

Alvarado Theatre. 1936 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Facade before remodel, with crowd.
Box 1, Folder 6

Alvarado Theatre. 1936 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Facade after remodel.
Box 1, Folder 7

American Theatre - Newhall.

Box 1, Folder 8

Anaheim Theatre. 1936 - Anaheim.

Box 1, Folder 9

Arcade Theatre. 1937-1938 - Los Angeles.

Box 1, Folder 10

Arden Theatre. 1942-1947 - Lynwood

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Foyer, art glass panel.
Box 1, Folder 10

Arden Theatre. 1942-1947 - Lynwood

Creator/Collector: Photo Enterprise
Physical Description: Facade night.
Box 1, Folder 10

Arden Theatre. 1942-1947 - Lynwood

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Foyer, candy counter.
Box 1, Folder 10

Arden Theatre. 1942-1947 - Lynwood

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Facade day.
Box 1, Folder 10

Arden Theatre. 1942-1947 - Lynwood

Creator/Collector: Phototek RMDecker
Physical Description: Construction.
Box 1, Folder 11

Avo Theatre. 1948 - Vista.

Box 1, Folder 12

Bard's Theatre - Los Angeles.

Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Entrance ladies' lounge.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Candy Counter.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Auditorium.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Physical Description: Lee on construction site.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Creator/Collector: Jerry Schwartz Palisades Photo
Physical Description: Foyer.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Physical Description: Exterior opening night.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Creator/Collector: Jerry Schwartz Palisades Press
Physical Description: Mural upper foyer.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Physical Description: Lee at opening.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Creator/Collector: Jerry Schwartz Palisades Press
Physical Description: Mural main foyer.
Box 1, Folder 13

Bay Theatre. 1948-1949 - Pacific Palisades

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch.
Box 1, Folder 14

Berkeley Theatre - Berkeley.

Box 1, Folder 15

Beverly Theatre. 1936 - Beverly Hills

Physical Description: Perspective sketch.
Box 1, Folder 16

Big Bear Theatre. 1944 - Big Bear

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch.
Box 1, Folder 17

Bruin Theatre. 1937 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Foyer.
Box 1, Folder 17

Bruin Theatre. 1937 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Perspective sketch.
Box 1, Folder 17

Bruin Theatre. 1937 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Floor plan.
Box 1, Folder 17

Bruin Theatre.

Box 1, Folder 18

Bundy Theatre. 1941 - Santa Monica.

Box 1, Folder 19

Calco Theatre. ca. 1946 - South Gate.

Box 1, Folder 20

California Theatre.

Box 1, Folder 21

Carlos Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Carlos

Physical Description: Foyer.
Box 1, Folder 21

Carlos Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Carlos

Physical Description: Auditorium mural.
Box 1, Folder 21

Carlos Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Carlos

Physical Description: Exterior night.
Box 1, Folder 21

Carlos Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Carlos

Physical Description: Exterior day.
Box 1, Folder 21

Carlos Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Carlos

Physical Description: Auditorium.
Box 1, Folder 21

Carlos Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Carlos

Physical Description: Perspective sketch.
Box 1, Folder 22

Carmel Theatre. 1935 - Carmel.

Box 1, Folder 23

Cavern Theatre.

Box 1, Folder 24

Chapultepec Theatre. 1943-1944 - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Javier Sivilla Artistic Photo
Physical Description: View from balcony.
Box 1, Folder 24

Chapultepec Theatre. 1943-1944 - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Javier Sivilla Artistic Photo
Physical Description: Lounge entrance.
Box 1, Folder 24

Chapultepec Theatre. 1943-1944 - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Javier Sivilla Artistic Photo
Physical Description: Foyer fountain.
Box 1, Folder 24

Chapultepec Theatre. 1943-1944 - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Javier Sivilla Artistic Photo
Physical Description: Stair in foyer.
Box 1, Folder 24

Chapultepec Theatre. 1943-1944 - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Javier Sivilla Artistic Photo
Physical Description: Mezzanine soda fountain.
Box 1, Folder 24

Chapultepec Theatre. 1943-1944 - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Javier Sivilla Artistic Photo
Physical Description: Inside foyer.
Box 1, Folder 24

Chapultepec Theatre. 1943-1944 - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Javier Sivilla Artistic Photo
Physical Description: Outer lobby.
Box 1, Folder 24

Chapultepec Theatre. 1943-1944 - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Javier Sivilla Artistic Photo
Physical Description: Proscenium.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Construction.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch day.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Physical Description: Projection room, projectionist.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Creator/Collector: Ambassador Photographers
Physical Description: Foyer art glass panel.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Creator/Collector: Ambassador Photographers
Physical Description: Auditorium.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Creator/Collector: Ambassador Photographers
Physical Description: Foyer opening night.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Creator/Collector: Ambassador Photographers
Physical Description: Exterior gala premiere.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch night.
Box 2, Folder 1

Chino Theatre. 1947 - Chino

Creator/Collector: Bob Ritter
Physical Description: Exterior day.
Box 2, Folder 2

Chotiner Theatre - Pasadena Project.

Box 2, Folder 3

Cinema Theatre - Los Angeles.

Box 2, Folder 4

Crenshaw Theatre.

Box 2, Folder 5

De Anza Theatre. 1937-1939 - Riverside

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Streamline Moderne
Box 2, Folder 5

De Anza Theatre. 1937-1939 - Riverside,

Physical Description: Perspective sketch, Rendering of the De Anza Theatre at 123 Elm Street in Riverside, California 6 × 9.

Additional Note

The De Anza is a modest, simplified Streamline Moderne style theatre appropriate for a small city. Differences between the rendering and the exterior of the finished building show that much of the streamlining was eliminated, with the exception of the curved façade at the corner and the curved form of the pylon. The photographer, Julius Shulman, captured the new theatre in full sunlight with deep shadows; his image accentuates the dramatic black and white contrasts and the sculptural forms of the building. The gently curved blond wood-paneled walls of the auditorium and the flowing figures executed in bas relief flanking the screen carry out the Streamline Moderne theme. The curving, wood-paneled foyer displays a bas relief wood-on-wood mural depicting the arrival of Spanish explorer De Anza in California. An extravagantly curved couch, streamlined settees with curved arms and backs, and a table with curving legs furnish the ladies' lounge. The boxed chandelier susp! ended from the ceiling is typical of the Moderne taste for soft, indirect lighting. Shulman's photograph takes advantage of the strong natural light from the windows to create a study in light and shadow.
Box 2, Folder 5

De Anza Theatre. 1937-1939 - Riverside

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Streamline Moderne
Box 2, Folder 5

De Anza Theatre. 1937-1939 - Riverside

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Lounge 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Streamline Moderne
Box 2, Folder 5

De Anza Theatre. 1937-1939 - Riverside

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Streamline Moderne
Box 2, Folder 6

Dinuba Theatre. 1940-1941 - Dinuba.

Box 2, Folder 7

Disney Theatre. 1939-1941 - Burbank

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The Disney Theatre was used for private screenings on the Disney lot. Lee's concept shows a glistening exterior of shiny materials, perhaps glass or ceramic tile. To add height and presence to the building, Lee set the entrance up on a podium and accented the semi-circular Streamline Moderne façade with vertical tower forms. A broad overhanging marquee echoes the circular form of the façade; its recessed lights illuminate the glass-walled foyer and the area around the entrance.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Physical Description: Construction detail 4 × 5.

Additional Note

A series of snapshots taken at the construction site shows how the screen structure was framed on the ground and then tilted up using wooden wheels as fulcrums. This innovative construction technique was borrowed from concrete tilt-slab construction pioneered in Southern California in the early part of the century by Irving Gill and later used by other Southern California modernists.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Sign 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee gave the sign (4) a Streamline Moderne look, but the screen structure (5) itself is almost completely utilitarian.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres - Ventura

Creator/Collector: Morris ' Monroe
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This earliest-known concept for a Drive-in theater by Lee, the Ventura Drive-In, shows a sophisticated use of illuminated triangular forms massed alongside the large illuminated screen structure and along the edges of the parking lot, creating an advertising sign for the theater out of the Drive-in form itself. The sharp-edged forms are clearly Art Deco in character, a style that is sometimes called Zig-Zag Moderne. The design vocabulary was adapted from usage current in theatre design at the time. A note on the back of the print reads: Original Conception Drive-In Plans Completed - Project not constructed.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Physical Description: Construction 4 × 5.

Additional Note

A series of snapshots taken at the construction site shows how the screen structure was framed on the ground and then tilted up using wooden wheels as fulcrums. This innovative construction technique was borrowed from concrete tilt-slab construction pioneered in Southern California in the early part of the century by Irving Gill and later used by other Southern California modernists.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - San Diego

Physical Description: Screen, parking view 4 × 6.

Additional Note

This view of the screen shows the typical Drive-in parking lot and speaker stanchions. The wings flanking the projection screen were built to deflect light from passing cars and also to obstruct the view of the screen from non-paying viewers outside the parking lot.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Physical Description: Construction 4 × 5.

Additional Note

A series of snapshots taken at the construction site shows how the screen structure was framed on the ground and then tilted up using wooden wheels as fulcrums. This innovative construction technique was borrowed from concrete tilt-slab construction pioneered in Southern California in the early part of the century by Irving Gill and later used by other Southern California modernists.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Physical Description: Construction 4 × 5.

Additional Note

A series of snapshots taken at the construction site shows how the screen structure was framed on the ground and then tilted up using wooden wheels as fulcrums. This innovative construction technique was borrowed from concrete tilt-slab construction pioneered in Southern California in the early part of the century by Irving Gill and later used by other Southern California modernists.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Physical Description: Construction 4 × 5.

Additional Note

A series of snapshots taken at the construction site shows how the screen structure was framed on the ground and then tilted up using wooden wheels as fulcrums. This innovative construction technique was borrowed from concrete tilt-slab construction pioneered in Southern California in the early part of the century by Irving Gill and later used by other Southern California modernists.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Physical Description: Construction 4 × 5.

Additional Note

A series of snapshots taken at the construction site shows how the screen structure was framed on the ground and then tilted up using wooden wheels as fulcrums. This innovative construction technique was borrowed from concrete tilt-slab construction pioneered in Southern California in the early part of the century by Irving Gill and later used by other Southern California modernists.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - San Diego

Physical Description: Sign 4 × 6.

Additional Note

Snapshot view of the El Rancho Drive-In sign.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - San Diego

Physical Description: Screen, street view 4 × 6.

Additional Note

The Rancho Drive-In in San Diego was built in the same year (1948) as the Edwards Drive-In in Arcadia. Although no construction photos survive, the construction technique was presumably similar. In this example, Lee used the street side of the screen structure to feature a colorful mural-like scene of the Mexican landscape illuminated from behind, a cultural reference appropriate to the border city of San Diego.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Screen, parking view 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This view of the screen (7) from the parking lot shows the angled parking bays and speaker posts.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres - El Monte

Physical Description: Aerial view 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Drive-in theatre, El Monte, California. Aerial view.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Screen, pylon sign from street 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The completed theater (3) relies on a monumental sign perpendicular to the screen structure to attract customers.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Bird's-eye rendering 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The Drive-in theatre concept was first tried in the mid-1930s, but only after World War II did the idea gain widespread acceptance. Lee designed several Drive-in theaters, a type especially suited to the mild climate and car-dependent economy of Southern California. The Drive-in allowed the whole family to go to the movies in the family car, with no need for a baby-sitter. It also proved especially popular with dating teen-agers, who found Drive-ins the ideal refuge from watchful adult eyes. The Drive-in was also cheap to build. A large piece of land, a structure to display the screen and smaller buildings for tickets, refreshments and the projector were all that was needed. The parking lot was usually graded to provide the parked cars with a good angle for viewing the screen, and each space was equipped with a speaker that could be hooked to the dashboard to bring the sound into the car.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's renderings for the Edwards Drive-In in Arcadia (1948) show both a perspective plan (1) and a perspective from the road (2). The theater was planned in conjunction with Arcadia's Royal Oaks subdivision, hence the image of the oak and the reference to oaks in the original scheme.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Screen, street view 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee gave the sign (4) a Streamline Moderne look, but the screen structure (5) itself is almost completely utilitarian.
Box 2, Folder 8

Drive-in Theatres. 1948 - Arcadia

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Structure detail 8 × 10.

Additional Note

To give the screen structure a more substantial-looking base, Lee designed a series of tall ladder-like structures (6) that he covered with translucent corrugated plastic panels. This structure may have been illuminated from within at night to attract customers.
Box 2, Folder 9

Egyptian Theatre. 1936 - Long Beach?

Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's concept rendering for a storefront theatre in the popular Egyptian theme betrays little attention on the façade to Egyptian-derived elements. The tall pylon sign, the illuminated marque extended out over the sidewalk, and the dramatically curved forms all serve to advertise the product to the audience on the street.
Box 2, Folder 10

Follies Theatre

Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The foyer was a small cramped space, used only for collecting tickets.
Box 2, Folder 10

Follies Theatre

Physical Description: Auditorium, boxes 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Box seats were also available at the sides of the main or orchestra level.
Box 2, Folder 10

Follies Theatre

Physical Description: Lobby entrance 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The Lee collection contains a number of photographs of theatres that Lee was charged with remodeling. This series of photos of a turn-of-the-century vaudeville theatre illustrates, by contrast, the innovations developed by architects for motion picture theatres. The entry to these older theatres was often off the street, through a long hallway. Advertising displays were merely cardboard signs.
Box 2, Folder 10

Follies Theatre

Physical Description: Auditorium, balcony 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Traditional-style chandeliers hung from the ceiling.
Box 2, Folder 10

Follies Theatre

Physical Description: Auditorium, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

All design attention and expense were focused on the elaborate Beaux Arts-style auditorium, which featured a proscenium flanked by protruding boxes.
Box 2, Folder 11

Fox Florence Theatre.

Box 2, Folder 12

Fox Long Beach Theatre (West Coast Theatre). 1931 - Long Beach

Creator/Collector: George D. Haight
Physical Description: Auditorium, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The Beaux Arts style interior features a proscenium arch framed by pseudo quoins and flanked by giant compositions of paired columns centered by oversize sculptures and cartouches. There is clearly a stage behind the curtain and the organ used to accompany silent motion pictures is seen at the lower left. The perforated panel in the center of the ceiling is a ventilation vent.
Box 2, Folder 12

Fox Long Beach Theatre (West Coast Theatre). 1931 - Long Beach

Creator/Collector: George D. Haight
Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee designed an elegant Beaux Arts style theatre to be used both for legitimate stage shows and motion pictures for the Southern California beach city, Long Beach. The massive poured-concrete building with its monumental cornice centered by a giant cartouche dominated the urban landscape of downtown Long Beach. The retail shop fronts at street level give a sense of the scale of the building.
Box 2, Folder 12

Fox Long Beach Theatre (West Coast Theatre). 1931 - Long Beach

Creator/Collector: George D. Haight
Physical Description: Auditorium, lantern 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's design for the ceiling lanterns incorporates traditional motifs such as fleurs-de-lys and sunbursts, while using sharp-edged geometry borrowed from Art Deco motifs.
Box 2, Folder 12

Fox Long Beach Theatre (West Coast Theatre). 1931 - Long Beach

Creator/Collector: George D. Haight
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The foyer is low-ceilinged and relatively narrow. It serves primarily as access to the balcony. The pylons atop the newel posts echo the giant pylons on the façade. The coffered and stenciled ceiling is a scaled-down version of the auditorium ceiling.
Box 2, Folder 12

Fox Long Beach Theatre (West Coast Theatre). 1931 - Long Beach

Creator/Collector: George D. Haight
Physical Description: Auditorium detail 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Larger-than-life sculptures of women representing comedy and tragedy flank the stage; such representations are common motifs in theatre design. Both the statues and the surrounding columns are of cast stone. The columns are painted to simulate marble.
Box 2, Folder 12

Fox Long Beach Theatre (West Coast Theatre). 1931 - Long Beach

Creator/Collector: George D. Haight
Physical Description: Auditorium rear 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This view shows the lower and upper balconies. The side walls were painted to simulate masonry with superimposed pilasters. Lee designed unusual indirect lighting fixtures and shades for the ceiling, side walls and under the balcony.
Box 2, Folder 12

Fox Long Beach Theatre (West Coast Theatre). 1931 - Long Beach

Creator/Collector: George D. Haight
Physical Description: Mezzanine 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The mezzanine floor offers access to the lower balcony and stairs lead up to the upper balcony. The vaulted ceiling features stenciled beams with some arches filled in with stenciled garlands reminiscent of designs by Adams. Settees and chairs reflect the scale of the building.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Ladies' lounge 8 × 10.

Additional Note

In the ladies' lounge, Lee scaled down the furniture and used curves and rounded edges. Individual vanities with shelves, seats and mirrors were typical of large motion picture theatres of the period. The bouquet of flowers on the table indicates that the photograph was taken at the time of the opening.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Auditorium,balcony 8 × 10.

Additional Note

On this wall an archer takes aim at a gazelle, while birds fly overhead. Jewel-like lanterns composed of geometrically shaped glass panes hang from the ceiling.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Box office, lobby 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's design for the lobby, with the sunburst design on the terrazzo floor, repeated in the ceiling lights, the gilded zig-zag chevron motifs over the doors and the heavy gilded ornament of the box office illustrates his motto: The show started on the sidewalk.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Auditorium, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The walls and ceiling are decorated with swirling Art Deco and Zig-Zag motifs, accented by a pair of leaping mythical gazelles above the proscenium. Above them a gilded sunburst spreads out over the ceiling, an ornament incorporating the air intake grille of the ventilation system. The fire curtain displays an abstracted version of the Arizona desert landscape. Gilded grilles echoing the design of the box office and topped by sunbursts flank the proscenium above the front exits. The theatre organ, to accompany silent motion pictures, is at the front of the auditorium.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: Kunselman Photo
Physical Description: Construction 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This photograph of the theatre under construction shows the auditorium space offset to the left, belying the symmetry of the façade.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Physical Description: Auditorium pylon detail 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This photograph shows the base of one of the cast stone auditorium pilasters before installation.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-193 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Lounge 8 × 10.

Additional Note

In the commodious upstairs lounge, Lee repeated the sunburst motif in the doors to the men's and ladies' rooms. A drinking fountain set into a marble niche was framed by an abstract fountain design painted on the wall. Sculptures of rearing horses set on the tables introduce a Western theme. The large-scale furnishings with their angular forms are similar to those in the foyer.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The Fox Phoenix Theatre of 1930-1931 was one of Lee's largest and most elaborate creations. Designed in the sharp-edged, abstract Zig-Zag Moderne style, the building covered half of one of Phoenix's giant city blocks and had retail shop fronts at the sidewalk. Colored translucent glass in an Art Deco design decorated the transoms above the display windows. The auditorium is offset to the left behind the symmetrical façade. The foyer is in the interior of the building. A vertical neon sign mounted on the central pylon above the marquee advertises the theatre, while a temporary sign on the marquee advertises a cool interior, an important advantage in Phoenix's desert climate.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Mezzanine ? 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The foyer ceiling is decorated with large-scale Art Deco designs abstracted from leaf, flower, sun and wave forms. The arched ceiling is squared off and accentuated by wooden moldings forming broad ribs. Furniture, mirror and lights are all squared off with cut corners, contrasting with the curving forms painted on the ceiling. Even the carpet design exhibits angular diagonals.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Auditorium, side wall 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Mythical gazelle-like creatures romp in the abstract landscape decorating the auditorium walls. Sunbursts top the scalloped border of the scene at the top of the wall. Angular pilasters interrupt the wall surface; they probably house ventilation or sound ducts.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: Kunselman Photo
Physical Description: Construction site 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A photograph of the construction site shows the extent of the theatre in relationship to nearby buildings and the surrounding low-rise urban context.
Box 2, Folder 13

Fox Phoenix Theatre. 1930-1931 - Phoenix

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Foyer stair 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The most striking feature of the foyer is the dramatic curving staircase to the lounge and balcony. Slender metal poles topped with glass disks and globes accentuate the curving form that appears to float in the space, outlined by the delicate filigree of the metal railing.
Box 2, Folder 14

Fox Redondo Theatre. 1937-1939 - Redondo Beach

Physical Description: Perspective sketch, variant design 8 × 10.

Additional Note

In this concept drawing, Lee proposes another more elaborate Streamline Moderne design for the Fox Redondo Beach remodel.
Box 2, Folder 14

Fox Redondo Theatre. 1937-1939 - Redondo Beach

Physical Description: Exterior before remodel 5 × 7.

Additional Note

The old Fox Redondo Beach theatre was slated for a remodel and Lee presented two concepts. This photo shows the building to be remodeled. Written on back of photo: Theatre as it appears from main business section of Redondo.
Box 2, Folder 14

Fox Redondo Theatre. 1937-1939 - Redondo Beach

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, hand-colored 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Restyled as the Vogue Theatre, this concept replaces the previous Spanish Colonial Revival façade with a Streamline Moderne design current in the late 1930s.
Box 2, Folder 15

Fox Theatre. 1929-1930 - Bakersfield

Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's concept for the Fox Theatre in Bakersfield envisioned a major retail center anchored by the theatre on the corner and advertised by a multi-story tower rising at the corner. Designed in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, the building featured a series of arcades at street level, mission tile on the roof, white stucco walls, and elaborate Churrigueresque detailing in cast stone on the tower, especially around the tower windows.
Box 2, Folder 15

Fox Theatre. 1929-1930 - Bakersfield

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The auditorium is a so-called atmosphere theatre, a popular design type which created a stage set surrounding the audience. In this example, the auditorium simulates a Spanish Colonial Revival village into which the audience enters to see the show. Simulated buildings project from the walls, ivy hangs from their balconies and windows, trees painted on the wall behind provide a natural setting, and the whole is illuminated to create a realistic effect. Above is the dark sky, painted with clouds and featuring twinkling lights simulating the stars.
Box 2, Folder 15

Fox Theatre. 1929-1930 - Bakersfield

Physical Description: Exterior (publication) 8 × 11.

Additional Note

Considerably simplified and scaled down, the finished theatre retained its tower and some of the Churrigueresque detailing around the two lower tower windows. The square tower features a clock at the top. The stark poured concrete building maximizes the square footage of the lot. The marquee and arcade at street level and the curvilinear gable and balcony on the left wall relieve the severity of the design.
Box 2, Folder 15

Fox Theatre. 1929-1930 - Bakersfield

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Stair 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Massive arches and stenciled decoration on the staircase walls carry out the Spanish Colonial Revival theme.
Box 2, Folder 15

Fox Theatre. 1929-1930 - Bakersfield

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Dramatic sloping beams (in poured concrete) stenciled in geometric designs enliven the foyer.
Box 2, Folder 15

Fox Theatre. 1929-1930 - Bakersfield

Creator/Collector: Dorman's Photo
Physical Description: Foyer, tapestry 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Tapestries depicting a map (right) and the Conquistadores encountering Native Americans decorate the foyer walls.
Box 2, Folder 16

Fox Westwood Theatre.

Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Physical Description: Foyer, perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The concept for the foyer proposed a domed ceiling, executed perhaps in stained glass or in paint on plaster. Curved staircases lead to the mezzanine above.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: Mayson W. Shouler
Physical Description: Detail 5 × 7.

Additional Note

This abstract floral and leaf design executed in cast stone was probably part of a screen over a ventilation or sound duct at the side of the proscenium arch.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: Mott Studios
Physical Description: Ladies' lounge 8 × 10.

Additional Note

For the ladies' lounge, Lee used reflective black wall surfaces, angular mirrors, a white ceiling and zig-zag shaped vanity lights to create the glamorous sophisticated look associated with Hollywood in the 1920s.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Physical Description: Exterior, interiors (publication) 11 × 8.

Additional Note

Four photographs published at the time of the opening show the mezzanine, (top right), the exterior (center), the foyer (lower left), and the auditorium (lower right).
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: Mayson W. Shouler
Physical Description: Construction, May 8, 1930 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The angular-shaped tower dominates the already completed walls of the auditorium and stage flies.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Exterior night 10 × 8.

Additional Note

The Fox Wilshire on opening night illuminated by spotlights and draped with bunting. The exterior design was a much simplified version of Lee's many concepts. The Fox sign became the most prominent attribute of the tower at night.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: Mayson W. Shouler
Physical Description: Construction, February 27, 1930 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This construction photo shows the basement and the mass of wood framing used to make the forms for the poured concrete. The large derrick in the background was used to lift the materials and equipment up as the building rose.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: Mott Studios
Physical Description: Auditorium, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The stage curtain panels in another possible configuration.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: Mott Studios
Physical Description: Auditorium, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The stage opening is set back deeply into a much larger proscenium arch. The sloping walls and ceiling surrounding the stage are heavily ornamented in gilt or silver plaster relief; the forms are the abstracted designs from nature and geometry typical of Art Deco design. The stage curtain was designed in separate panels that could be raised individually to adjust the space to stage productions or motion picture screenings while introducing a dramatic design element at the same time.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: Mayson W. Shouler
Physical Description: Construction, March 27, 1930 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Here, two derricks are operating as the building rises on the corner of Wilshire Boulevard.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Physical Description: Auditorium, perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The interior design concept was in lavish Art Deco with contrasting light and dark (probably black and silver or gilt).
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: Mott Studios
Physical Description: Auditorium, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The stage curtain in place for motion picture screening.
Box 3, Folder 1

Fox Wilshire Theatre. 1928-1930 - Beverly Hills

Physical Description: Exterior renderings (publication) 11 × 8.

Additional Note

This publication shows three of Lee's many concepts for this lavish and important building in Beverly Hills. The building opened on September 19, 1930, only weeks before the stock market crash. Several sketches for the landmark tower survive in the Lee collection.
Box 3, Folder 2

Fremont Theatre. 1941-1942 - San Luis Obispo.

Box 3, Folder 3

Garmar Theatre. 1949-1950 - Montebello

Creator/Collector: Morris ' Monroe
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.
Box 3, Folder 3

Garmar Theatre. 1949-1950 - Montebello

Creator/Collector: L.A. Todd
Physical Description: Entrance, marquee 8 × 10.
Box 3, Folder 3

Garmar Theatre. 1949-1950 - Montebello

Creator/Collector: L.A. Todd
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.
Box 3, Folder 3

Garmar Theatre. 1949-1950 - Montebello

Creator/Collector: L.A. Todd
Physical Description: Crying room 8 × 10.
Box 3, Folder 3

Garmar Theatre. 1949-1950 - Montebello

Creator/Collector: L.A. Todd
Physical Description: Projection room 8 × 10.
Box 3, Folder 4

Gentry Theatre. 1937 - Compton.

Box 3, Folder 5

Grand Theatre. 1936 - Clarkdale Arizona

Physical Description: Handwritten note on reverse 7 × 11.

Additional Note

Correspondence.
Box 3, Folder 5

Grand Theatre. 1936 - Clarke?dale Arizona

Physical Description: Collage, exterior and interior 7 × 11.

Additional Note

This 250 seat theatre for the United Verde Copper company in Clarkdale, Arizona was probably Lee's simplest design and smallest commission. The crowd of people in front of the theatre, the handwritten note on the reverse of the picture, and the letter from the theatre manager all attest to the appreciation of this small theatre in a remote town in northern Arizona.
Box 3, Folder 5

Grand Theatre. 1936 - Clarkdale Arizona

Physical Description: Pencil note on reverse 7 × 11.

Additional Note

Two ceiling fans, some benches painted red and a crying room were all features added to this little theatre.
Box 3, Folder 5

Grand Theatre. 1936 - Clarkdale Arizona

Physical Description: Letter to SCL, typescript 9 × 11.
Box 3, Folder 5

Grand Theatre. 1936 - Clarkdale Arizona

Physical Description: Letter from Joe Becchetti, December 18, 1936 11 × 9.
Box 3, Folder 6

Harper Grand Theatre. 1948 - Fontana.

Box 3, Folder 7

Helix Theatre. 1947-1948 - La Mesa

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Exterior, entry doors 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The design evolved into a storefront remodel using every device to capture attention from the passerby. The strong diamond pattern applied to the upper story, the series of vertical posts applied at street and the paneled entry doors draw attention to the centerpiece, the curving neon-outlined marquee. A curved box office at the sidewalk and poster cases framed in wavey edged box frames are overwhelmed by the other design elements. Here, the chief purpose of the design is to draw attention to the storefront by using a variety of cheap applied elements without regard for design integration.
Box 3, Folder 7

Helix Theatre. 1947-1948 - La Mesa

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch variant 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A later concept drawing shows a scaled-down design which is more conventional in massing. Streamline forms can still be seen in the sign area and in the porthole window on the right wall. However, the chief design elements have evolved from the smooth to the angular with walls, marquee and canopies project out and up at angles.
Box 3, Folder 7

Helix Theatre. 1947-1948 - La Mesa

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This concept drawing, probably executed before World War II, uses simple curved forms of Streamline Moderne in the building. A huge sign with a spiral or helix-shaped tower dominates the façade.
Box 3, Folder 8

Hippodrome Theatre

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Put this with 50401-50408. A discussion of these various concepts will pull these images together.
Box 3, Folder 9

Hollywood Theatre. 1936 - Hollywood

Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This modest remodel of a storefront theatre replaced an earlier remodel of 1927 on a commercial building dating from 1919. The storefront tenants are all theatre-related, a restaurant where theatre patrons can eat before the show, a popcorn shop, a candy store for candy to take into the show and a bookstore to browse in while waiting for the show to start. The neon-lit marquee and the tall neon sign attached to the parapet draw attention to the theatre entrance.
Box 3, Folder 10

Hopkins Theatre. 1938-1941 - Oakland

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This elaborate concept drawing shows a Streamline Moderne design using convex and concave curves, a prow-shaped pylon, and angular massing.
Box 3, Folder 10

Hopkins Theatre. 1938-1941 - Oakland

Creator/Collector: M.L. Cohen
Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10.

Additional Note

As built, the theatre was a much simplified Streamline Moderne façade overlaid on a basic brick commercial building. Strong contrasts between black and white and streams of neon outlining the marquee draw attention to the building.
Box 3, Folder 10

Hopkins Theatre. 1938-1941 - Oakland

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The simple interior design illustrates the Streamline theme with the use of painted curves on the walls and semicircular ceiling panels that conceal lights, creating indirect lighting of the ceiling. Instead of a balcony, the rear of the auditorium is raked and separated from the main floor by a low partition and steps.
Box 3, Folder 10

Huntridge Theatre.

Box 3, Folder 11

Iris Theatre - Hollywood.

Box 3, Folder 11

Huntridge Theatre. 1943 - Las Vegas Nevada

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee recycled this design for his proposed concept for the Lakewood Theatre in Lakewood, California.
Box 3, Folder 12

Iris Theatre - Hollywood.

Box 3, Folder 13

Ken Theatre. ca. 1950 - San Diego.

Box 3, Folder 14

Kinema Theatre. 1917, 1931 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Remodel 1931 (1917 building).
Box 3, Folder 15

La Reina Theatre. 1937-1938 - Sherman Oaks.

Box 3, Folder 16

La Tijera Theatre. 1948-1949 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Alpheus Blakeslee
Physical Description: Exterior day 8 × 10.

Additional Note

In the late 1940s and 1950s architects combined the fluid forms of the Streamline Moderne style with the square modules favored by International Style architects. In California, a new form of architectural modernism was developing that favored the use of natural materials, especially stone and wood, foremost in residential building. These influences, however, were also felt in commercial buildings, especially in the suburbs. Hence La Tijera Theatre, on Sepulveda Boulevard in a growing suburban area near the airport. A streamlined automobile can be seen entering the porte-cochere on the left.
Box 3, Folder 16

La Tijera Theatre. 1948-1949 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Exterior night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee designed his theatres to be most effective at night. The tall neon sign seems to hang in the air above the building. A grid of round lights underneath the canopy forms a high marquee and illuminates the entrance. Translucent panels on the lobby walls glow invitingly and the aluminum frames reflect the light. The poster cases are illuminated internally and outlined by neon strips.
Box 3, Folder 16

La Tijera Theatre. 1948-1949 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Ladies' lounge 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Round stools and round mirrors at the vanity counter and a curved banquette fitted to the curved wall of the ladies' lounge reinforce the Streamline look. Even the wallpaper, printed with a pattern of round tents, echoes the theme.
Box 3, Folder 16

La Tijera Theatre. 1948-1949 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Foyer, popcorn counter 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A mural on the slanting and curved wall of the foyer depicts a workman carrying a heavy basket (of sugar cane?) and a woman kneeling, both in a tropical setting.
Box 3, Folder 16

La Tijera Theatre. 1948-1949 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: L.A. Todd
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The auditorium walls curve towards the screen, interrupted in each side a scalloped wall edge where the screen curtain lit by indirect lighting begins. The effect is further enhanced by the continuation of a vine pattern on the walls in cut-out form over the front exit openings. Globes of light at the center of grilles concealing the ceiling fans neatly combine two functions. The ceiling is further decorated by a scalloped design painted around the light and ventilation fixtures.
Box 3, Folder 16

La Tijera Theatre. 1948-1949 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Foyer, view out to street 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Two-story floor-to-ceiling windows illuminate the foyer.
Box 3, Folder 16

La Tijera Theatre. 1948-1949 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's concept combines the flowing forms of Streamline Moderne, still considered the height of modernism, with the square modules and slim brick rectangular pylon borrowed from the International Style.
Box 3, Folder 16

La Tijera Theatre. 1948-1949 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: L.A. Todd
Physical Description: Foyer, bas relief 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A curved banquette flanks the candy counter and popcorn machine. Bouquets of flowers on the shelf above the banquette indicate the photo was taken on opening night.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Auditorium, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The typical proscenium arch has been dispensed with, although it is still indicated by the swags of the valance and the curtain before the screen. Decoration is minimal and concentrates solely on the curved portion of the side walls flanking the screen.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Sleek banquettes upholstered in a striped fabric are set into the walls of the foyer. An overhanging cornice creates the opportunity to conceal indirect lighting and reduces the space to a human scale. A narrow screen pierced by square, framed cut-outs is located at the end of the banquette, enhancing a sense of enclosure.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

As the theatre was a re-use of an earlier building, Lee had little opportunity for interior structural changes. For the foyer, Lee chose modern, rectangular lines. Paneled auditorium doors and the simplified Greek key design painted on the upper wall add interest.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's design was adapted to remodeling the old Town Hall on the site. The pylon with its scalloped sides and the marquee are the only design elements on the exterior.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Auditorium, sidewall 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Abstract metal sculptures evoking a pineapple ornament the side walls. Their reflective surfaces and the wavy reflective stripes behind them give a touch of elegance of Regency Moderne to the otherwise utilitarian auditorium.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch variant 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This later rendering was far more streamlined than the earlier version with curving walls, porthole openings and prow-like pylons. The airplane flying overhead reinforces the streamlined imagery.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Harry Dallas
Physical Description: Lee, opening night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

At opening night ceremonies, Lee (at left), holds a bouquet of roses together with a woman, probably the client's wife. Man at right is unidentified.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Probably hoping to get a larger commission than just a theatre, Lee produced this perspective sketch of his concept for a theatre integrated with a bank and a retail store. The Los Angeles suburb of Lakewood was a post-war phenomenon where thousands of houses were built in record time to create an entirely new community. Lakewood needed everything for its shopping center - banks, stores, and of course, a motion picture theatre.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: Western Photo
Physical Description: Marquee 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This night photo of the marquee with its neon strips and interior illuminated sign was taken as a publicity photo for Bevelite, the manufacturer of the removable letters used to spell out the names of the show and the stars on the marquee.
Box 3, Folder 17

Lakewood Theatre. 1944-1945 - Lakewood

Creator/Collector: U.S. Aviation Corporation
Physical Description: Aerial view 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lakewood's shopping center in the foreground is surrounded by vacant fields. The houses of the new community are going up in the background. An older village, Quincy, at lower left, will soon be surrounded by the new town. Two blocks at left center are marked as designated for a City College.
Box 3, Folder 18

Laurel Theatre. 1940-1941.

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

In this rendering, Lee develops a concept based on the curvilinear forms of Streamline Moderne. Using swags and garlands and leaf and shell motifs as well as an L monogram at the front of the marquee, Lee applies a vocabulary of images borrowed from the Regency style of early 19th century England to the Streamlined forms of 1930s architecture.
Box 3, Folder 19

Leimert Theatre - Los Angeles, [Sunset?].

Box 4, Folder 1

Lido Theatre. 1942 - Mexico City.

Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Physical Description: Diseno en perspectiva 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's concept for a large theatre in Mexico City uses circular domed forms borrowed from the Arabic tradition in Spain and applies elaborate encrustations of Churrigueresque ornament typical of the Spanish Baroque around the monumental central entry, at the cornice line and to frame the windows. Elaborate finials top the parapets and the suggestion of a minaret can be seen on the right.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This theatre, situated at Villa de Guadalupe, Montevideo 96 (a suburb of Mexico City) opened December 25, 1942, and is still in use.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Auditorium, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Simple curving lines and a sumptuously draped curtain suggest an understated elegance. The wall pilasters conceal indirect lights. Large round translucent glass discs in the ceiling diffuse the light over the space.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Auditorium entrance 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A grandiose Art Deco Baroque design frames the entrance to the auditorium. The center panel appears to be leather or fabric, with a design of three maidens flying through the air, bearing bouquets of flowers. The foyer walls are wood veneer, with the flitches laid on in a mirror pattern, making long vertical stripes on the walls.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Auditorium side wall, murals 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Colorful murals set in fanciful round painted frames depict regional dances and garb of Old Mexico.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10.

Additional Note

As built, the circular front kiosk and tower perform the function of advertising the theatre as a destination and display the posters for shows to passersby.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Physical Description: Construction 2 × 3.

Additional Note

Construction photos reveal the immense effort involved in constructing this very large building. Unlike counterparts in the United States that were being built of poured concrete using derricks and heavy machinery, this building in Mexico City in the 1940s was painstakingly constructed of brick that was then surfaced with stucco.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Exterior, side elevation 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The box office is housed in a round domed next to the entry. The buttresses on the wall at left are topped by pyramidal caps and crowned by finials.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Exterior, box office 5 × 7.

Additional Note

The domed box office is at street level, but the entry itself is reached by a broad flight of stairs. Setting the building on a podium with an entrance set well back from the street differs from the usual motion picture theatre in the United States which is entered at street level. The theatre is made more imposing, reflecting the cosmopolitan atmosphere of Mexico City and the more formal Mexican custom of spending the whole evening out, eating and dancing in the restaurant.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This night view emphasizes the illuminated tower and a round illuminated kiosk in Streamline Moderne style that would serve to attract people to the theatre.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Physical Description: Ticket window, detail 5 × 7.

Additional Note

The box office ticket window is framed by cast stone detailing suggesting a theatre curtain drawn open. Below the window is a small sign giving the name of the architect and the date, a detail usually omitted on buildings in the United States.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Physical Description: Construction 2 × 3.

Additional Note

The outline of the building takes shape. An arcade and a sinuous curved wall form a courtyard beside the auditorium wall.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Physical Description: Construction 2 × 3.

Additional Note

The dome of the box office was also constructed of brick, using a technique probably brought to Spain by the Arabs.
Box 4, Folder 2

Linda Vista Theatre. 1942 - Tepayac, Mexico City, DF

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Restaurant patio 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The large sunken patio next to the auditorium was an extension of the restaurant inside. Here people could eat, drink and socialize and also watch people on the street, a favorite pastime in Mexico.
Box 4, Folder 3

Loma Theatre. 1944-1946 - San Diego

Creator/Collector: Nate Singer
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Perhaps Lee's most utilitarian design, the Loma is essentially a large box set in a parking lot. This is a bare bones building constructed during wartime, probably to serve soldiers stationed in San Diego, one of the biggest military garrisons on the West Coast. Architectural details are virtually non-existent.
Box 4, Folder 3

Loma Theatre. 1944-1946 - San Diego

Creator/Collector: Nate Singer
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's design still puts the box office and sign with its canvas marquee at the sidewalk. They are connected to the entrance by a canvas canopy on poles. The porthole window and the pylon jutting up from the corner of the building are the only references to the Streamline Moderne style.
Box 4, Folder 4

Lyceum Theatre. 1935-1936 - San Francisco

Physical Description: Remodel.
Box 4, Folder 5

Mayfair Theatre. 1939-1940 - Ventura

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The realized building is less dramatic, partially because it is sited on a prosaic small-town street. Nevertheless, [the theatre] retains the portholes and swooping form of the roofline. The pylon sign and the curving marquee command the corner site.
Box 4, Folder 5

Mayfair Theatre. 1939-1940 - Ventura

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Lounge 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Indirect lighting concealed in the ceiling cove, and over-scaled couches and a mirror lend a spacious, elegant feeling to the simple space.
Box 4, Folder 5

Mayfair Theatre. 1939-1940 - Ventura

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The simple interior of the auditorium is enlivened by gently undulating walls that are abruptly interrupted by angular partitions that frame and enclose a pair of gigantic paintings of flowers flanking the proscenium.
Box 4, Folder 5

Mayfair Theatre. 1939-1940 - Ventura

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This sleek Streamline Moderne design with portholes and a swooping roof almost seems ready to take off from its site and hover over the ground like a proverbial flying saucer.
Box 4, Folder 6

Mexico City Theatres. 1941 - El Capitan, Tepeyac.

Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor section, auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Porthole windows accent the foyer wall decorated with giant mythological figures that appear to represent both European and ancient Mexican traditions.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor perspective, auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee combines circular and curved forms to render a space both imposing and elegant.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The concept shows a large sculpture, possibly a fountain (perhaps a version of the fountain in the Chapultepec Theatre), set in the curved space of the low-ceilinged foyer. A circular opening in the ceiling reveals the mezzanine above.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, foyer, 1. piso, view 1 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The concept shows a large sculpture, possibly a fountain (perhaps a version of the fountain in the Chapultepec Theatre), set in the curved space of the low-ceilinged foyer. A circular opening in the ceiling reveals the mezzanine above.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor perspective, restaurant 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Large-scale ceiling trusses, French doors leading to an outdoor dining space and dramatic hanging banners create a theatrical effect for this restaurant area which also features a dance floor.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, foyer, 2. piso, view 2 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The monumental space is focused on the larger than life-size figure sculpture, probably intended to be a fountain, flanked by curved walls decorated with abstract designs drawn from abstract art of the early twentieth century. Perhaps a study for the Chapultepec Theatre foyer sculpture.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor perspective, foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Here, Lee works with rectangles and flat surfaces. The space is grandiose. The ceiling opening may indicate a large indirect lighting scheme or an opening to a mezzanine above.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor section, foyer? 8 × 10.

Additional Note

In this version (See 40715) the wall is paneled in wood veneer and the applied decoration is an abstract design inspired by contemporary art forms.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, galeria, view 3 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Curved walls are decorated with oversize plant motifs, which contrast with the central sculpture reminiscent of Mayan or Aztec sculpture.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor section, auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The side exit doors of the auditorium are embellished with heavy Baroque ornament, while the wall above is finished in wood veneer set in a pattern of squares. An elaborate sculpture of a horse riding on waves flanks the proscenium.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor section, foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This section (stairs at right) depicts niches for sculpture on the side wall of the auditorium or a foyer area.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor perspective, proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The auditorium clearly includes a stage, providing the opportunity for live performances to be integrated into the evening's entertainment. Gigantic wave-like forms decorate the side wall.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor section, auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Another version of the scheme (See 40716) depicts an elaborate cosmological vision of planets, moon, and stars above the auditorium exit doors and a fierce warrior on horseback framing the proscenium.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor perspective, restaurant 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Low vaulted spaces and a high-ceilinged space with exposed rafters create the atmosphere of Old Mexico in this space to be used for eating, drinking, and entertainment.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee did a number of renderings for theatres to be built in Mexico City in the 1940s. At least two, perhaps three, were actually built. Because they included restaurants and other entertainment areas besides the motion picture theatre they were grander than most of his designs in the United States. This rendering depicts a grand foyer with a mezzanine and gigantic pylons anchoring the staircases at both sides.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor perspective, restaurant 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This view show the integration of the two previous restaurant areas, the larger high-ceilinged space in the foreground. An orchestra plays for dancing within one of the vaulted areas, while couples dance on the dance floor in the foreground.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee uses circular and spiral forms to create a grand semi-circular staircase to the mezzanine level. Pylons decorated with wave, shell and spiral designs support the mezzanine level above. A ceiling lamp composed of layers of circles accents the foyer ceiling.
Box 4, Folder 7

Mexico Theatre. 1945 - Mexico

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Watercolor perspective, foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee proposes a dramatic succession of spaces. A two-story curvilinear arch drawn from Spanish Baroque forms frames the entrance to a grand foyer embellished with Spanish Baroque designs in relief. A broad staircase beneath a dramatically curved opening leads from the grand foyer into a one-story foyer area.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Lounge entry 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A hallway space, not a room, the lounge features a curved banquette and a set of drinking fountains set in a mirrored niche. A curvilinear ceiling panel conceals the indirect lighting.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Auditorium, sculpture detail 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The larger than life-size sculpture of hunter with a bow and his dog is sleek and heroic, in the style of Prometheus at Rockefeller Center or the work of Carl Milles (40819, 40819).
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Auditorium, balcony 8 × 10.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Foyer entrance, lobby and lobby entrance to Huyler's 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The glass walls and doors of the foyer nearly erase the transition from the sidewalk to the interior of the theatre.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Drinking fountain 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee included a shorter drinking fountain, scaled for children. This was a new idea for the time.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Foyer, mural and seat 8 × 10.

Additional Note

All the elements in the rendering (40802) were realized in the building, although the spaces are necessarily compressed and the elements appear crowded. The scale and drama of each feature, the lighting panels, the entrance arch, the mezzanine walls and railing, the mural, and the giant cartouche above. Mirrored walls above the banquettes to the left and the right, with the mirrors set in a diamond pattern, enhance the complexity of the space, while at the same time enlarging it.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, candy counter 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The design for the refreshment or candy counter includes and overhanging canopy with scalloped edges, a curved counter with a diamond-patterned base, and porthole windows in the wall above. A mural with ocean motifs was part of the original concept. The final design evolved into a cleaner Streamline Moderne design in both the foyer candy counter (40810) and the mezzanine drink bar (40815).
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The Miami Theatre in downtown Miami, Florida, was Lee's last major motion picture theatre in the grand tradition of the movie palaces of the 1920s and 1930s. After 1950, smaller neighborhood theatres and Drive-ins became more popular with the development of the suburbs. The Miami, however, was one of Lee's largest and most all-encompassing designs executed in the United States. The complex included not only a motion picture theatre, which included a legitimate stage but also a restaurant and a candy store, all in a downtown urban setting. In the design, which was largely executed as shown in the renderings, Lee married Baroque and Rococo elements with Streamline Moderne features, producing an unusually eclectic design. The renderings show murals with sea-life motifs, suggesting that Lee drew inspiration from seashell and wave forms for many aspects of the design, which may account for the Baroque and Rococo-appearing design elements. Although demolished, the theatre is o! ne of the most extensively documented in the S. Charles Lee Collection at UCLA.The design of the façade, with its diamond-patterned panels and ornate cartouche is echoed in the interior. On the left is Huyler's, a candy shop and restaurant that was part of the theatre complex. The narrow site and the height of the building to the rear reflect the two-tier balcony and the long narrow plan of the auditorium, a scheme that Lee had used in his first major theatre, the Tower Theatre in Los Angeles.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: Ostergaard
Physical Description: Facade detail 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The scale of the cartouche is indicated by the life-size cardboard figure posed beside it.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Projection room 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The projection room is state of the art for 1946.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Stair to mezzanine 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Executed almost exactly as shown in the rendering (40803), the final forms of the staircase arch and ceiling panels are better integrated than in the rendering. The bending mirrored walls increase the complexity of the space.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The curved shapes, the treatment of the staircase, the poster cases, and the recessed lighting panels correspond closely to the rendering (40801). A focal point of the space is the mural of the Western hemisphere framed by the national flags and figures representing its peoples (40813). Banquettes with mirrored walls above them, flank the auditorium entrance.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Huyler's sweet shop counter 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Transparent glass walls facing the sidewalk and the lobby integrate the shop with the activity going on outside. The display counter and its cabinets and drawers are sleek and cleanly designed, as are the curving lunch counter and its simple chairs. The traditional forms of the glass chandelier lend a touch of historicist elegance to the otherwise stark interior.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Mezzanine drink bar 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The mezzanine drink bar and adjacent spaces has a simpler, more streamlined look than the downstairs foyer. Mirrored walls set at oblique angles create a more complex and confusing space.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Stair to mezzanine 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The stair to the mezzanine and lower balcony was set off to the side of the foyer and was simply executed, probably because of the constraints of space on the ground floor.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Stair to balcony 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This view of the mezzanine staircase corresponds more closely to the perspective in the rendering (40803).
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Auditorium rear 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The photograph shows that the auditorium design was extremely simple. It was the bands of indirect lighting running up the walls and across the ceiling as well as vertically along the side walls and underneath the rear ceilings that created the effect (40819).
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Auditorium front 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The simple lines of the long narrow auditorium, its shape dictated by the urban lot, all lead the eye toward the proscenium, which is framed by bands of indirect lighting and flanked by large scale designs in relief. A sumptuous curtain hung in swags fills the upper portion of the proscenium, scaling the immense arch down to cinema size.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Poster case 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Set right on the sidewalk, the poster cases are large and sleek. They provide a glimpse of the show within to every passerby. Titles in both English and Spanish reflect Miami's Latin American population, which is also depicted in the mural in the foyer (40812, 40813).
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The grand entrance to the auditorium, the curved lines of the mezzanine, the delicate tracery of the metal railing and the signature recessed lighting panels were realized for the most part in the building. See 40812.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Box office 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The recessed lobby draws the moviegoer into the space with neon tube strips on the ceiling focusing on the entrance and with the walls of floor to ceiling glass. The glass walls allow a view of the interior which glows at night. The box office with its curvilinear shape, also illuminated, and its sleek walls, plays to the fantasy of the moviegoers.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Huyler's restaurant 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The restaurant, located on the second floor, achieves a more elegant look with its sculptural ceiling light panels and the curvilinear back of the banquette on the far wall. The softly curtained windows overlooking the street would have cast an inviting night-time glow.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, foyer stair 8 × 10.

Additional Note

See 40816,40817. The curving lines and delicate tracery of the stair railing contrast with the heavily embellished stairway arch. Porthole windows, typical of the Streamline Moderne style, open up the staircase walls. A mural with sea-life motifs decorates the curved wall to the right of the staircase. The recessed lighting panels in the ceiling and the diamond-patterned mirrored walls echo similar features in the foyer.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Mural 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The focal point of the foyer is the mural at the auditorium entrance. The peoples and the flags of the countries of the Americas are ranged around a map of the continents. Even fruits and pets are included. It is clear that the theatre intended to attract Miami's Latin American community as well as English speakers.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Huyler's sweet shop 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Simple lines, recessed wall cabinets illuminated by indirect lighting, the butt-jointed glass display case and the recessed ceiling lighting were all new and fashionable design features of the Moderne of the 1930s and 1940s.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Huyler's entry from theatre 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Glass walls and a glass door invite the customers into Huyler's the adjacent restaurant and candy store.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Foyer entrance 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Curving lines, recessed lighting and mirrored surfaces create an expanding space in the foyer entrance area. The wavy wall with a surface of vertical ribs adds a sleeker streamlined look to the space (see 40804).
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Physical Description: Listening aid, crying room? 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The crying room, a feature of many theatres of the period, was a soundproof glass-walled viewing room for mothers with small children. Here the model demonstrates the audio device that transmitted sound to individual viewers. The acoustic tile on the walls began to be widely used in the 1940s and soon became ubiquitous.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Section, auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The auditorium section shows the two-tier balcony (40818, 40821) the recessed niche with a sculpture (40820), the wall decoration flanking the proscenium (40819) and the diamond pattern on the side walls of the auditorium.
Box 4, Folder 8

Miami Theatre. 1946-1947 - Miami

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The theatre as built closely resembles Lee's renderings. Here the foyer and staircase feature curved and angled walls and a startling rococo-like recessed ceiling panel that was to be lit by indirect lighting. See 40811, 40814.
Box 5, Folder 1

Miscellaneous Theatres. 1945 - Newsreel, B.H.

Box 5, Folder 2

Modesto Theatre - Modesto.

Box 5, Folder 3

New Theatre Sketches [Piedmont]

Physical Description: Renderings, 8 × 10 photos.
Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches. 1945.

Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches: Rio

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This design makes good use of a small urban lot by maximizing the advertising space. The design above the marquee is one unit, the design below another. The projecting marquee attracts the attention of both Driver and pedestrian. The exterior could be of concrete, plaster, terra cotta, glass or plastic, the lettering in copper or white metal.
Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches: Park

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This theatre is designed with a glass front. The box office has an automobile entrance to the parking lot with an automobile exit on the other side of the building. At night varicolored lights play on the façade and the building forms its own reflective background.
Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches: La Vona

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Note on reverse: This theatre shall be its own advertising and the front shall sell the picture. Each row will have different colored lighting arrangements and the whole will be a blaze of color with the new fluorescent lighting units.
Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches: Correa

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee produced a number of designs for newsreel theatres, a type of theatre that would show newsreels on a continuous basis. All the renderings describe in this archive as Theatre Design Concepts are newsreel theatres. The newsreel had been introduced as a short shown before the feature during the 1930s. World War II heightened interest in the newsreel, giving rise to the idea of small theatres showing newsreels only. As technology allowed, Lee began to increase his use of glass and later plastic, both transparent materials that could be used to great effect for buildings whose primary use was at night. Lee's renderings for these designs all show the buildings at night. By using transparent materials, Lee was creating illuminated sculptures that were their own advertisements for the film.Note on reverse: This modern idea has been designed to be inviting, entertaining and smart, to stand out in a busy location. The name on the theatre indicates the design was prepared for M! exico, probably in early 1940s.
Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches: Diana

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Note on reverse: This theatre is designed to be built in plastic; the unusual façade is, therefore, ... ...CHECK ORIGINAL.
Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches: Sign

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Note on reverse: This theatre is built with a glass front so the lobby may be viewed from the street. This makes the front entertaining in itself and stresses the fact that entertainment is housed within. The poster cases are designed to sell the show.
Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches: Town

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Note on reverse: This spectacular design has been planned to care for a change in theatre patronage. It is meant to speak up to the people to come in and see what is inside, and is planned for a locality where the newsreel has become an attraction.
Box 5, Folder 4

New Theatre Sketches: Pix

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Note on reverse: This theatre is designed for a residential neighborhood of modern character. It will be built of glass and stone. See the similar Bay Theatre in Pacific Palisades (11301-11310).
Box 5, Folder 5

New Theatre Sketches. 1947.

Box 5, Folder 6

Newsreel Theatre. 1942 - Oakland

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 8.

Additional Note

Lee's rendering depicts an eye-catching marquee, probably with a revolving and illuminated globe, attached to the three-story retail and office building in downtown Oakland (See 50401-50408 for newsreel theatre concepts).
Box 5, Folder 6

Newsreel Theatre. 1942 - Oakland

Physical Description: Existing facade 4 × 5.

Additional Note

This photograph of the existing building in downtown Oakland was the basis for Lee's concept rendering.
Box 5, Folder 7

New Theatre Sketches - Bakersfield.

Box 5, Folder 8

Palm Theatre. 1949 - Palmdale.

Box 5, Folder 9

Pantages Theatre.

Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Michael Greene
Physical Description: Facade, night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The night view shows how the use of neon strips exploited the simple lines of the building, making it a beacon for motorists driving along Pico Boulevard.
Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Auditorium side wall 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A molded form simulates a gigantic swag of fabric, creating a dramatic frame for the proscenium.
Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Auditorium rear 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Palms and flamingos are painted in bright paint on the dark side walls. Indirect lighting panels on the ceiling create a softly-lit interior which dramatizes the tropical scenes. Striped upholstery on the seats adds elegance to the simple space.
Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Auditorium from balcony 8 × 10.
Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Foyer, candy counter 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This photograph by Shulman reveals a mural on the left wall, the veneered woods below the mural and the sleek lines of the candy counter and popcorn machine.
Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Foyer entry 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee uses curves and indirect lighting to create complexity in the foyer. Julius Shulman's lighting adds drama to the photograph of the space.
Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Alpheus Blakeslee
Physical Description: Facade, day 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Newly built, the Picwood is set on a main boulevard in a residential neighborhood.
Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Box office, rendering 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The drawing style, with its curving frame, the simple swept lines of the box office, and the abstract lines on the lobby floor, which use motifs drawn from contemporary painting, all bespeak the era of the 1930s and 1940s.
Box 5, Folder 10

Picwood Theatre. 1946 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The Picwood was designed as a neighborhood theatre on Pico Boulevard in West Los Angeles. The design epitomized the modern post-war aesthetic, which required simple lines, inexpensive building materials and quick construction to satisfy the post-war boom. The simple curved pylon was a landmark in the flat landscape of one- and two-story buildings.
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Physical Description: Construction 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Physical Description: Opening night box office 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Physical Description: Construction 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Physical Description: Construction,end wall 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Physical Description: Construction 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Physical Description: Construction interior 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Physical Description: Truss detail 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Physical Description: Opening night,S. Charles Lee 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photographs show the process of framing and cladding the building, as well as the trucks and equipment used. Interior scaffolding (51103) shows how the frame was supported as it went up. A close-up of the truss detail (51104) shows how the trusses were bolted together. Workmen begin to finish the exterior (51105). The end wall is closed with V-angled boards (51106). Exterior finishing and ventilation ducts are added (51107). People line up at the box office on opening night (51108). The auditorium interior reveals its structural origins; (51109) the trusswork is left exposed in the ceiling. Lee (right) shakes hands with the owner (left) on opening night (51110).
Box 5, Folder 11

Puente Theatre. 1947-1948 - Puente

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's sketch offers a prototype for a theatre that could be built cheaply and quickly. The simplest means of quickly constructing a theatre-sized space was to build a Quonset hut, a method devised in the late 1930s using small wood members to create an arched truss frame, which was then often clad in metal for warehouse purposes. A number of motion picture theatres were built in this way. They offered inexpensive rapid construction of theatre spaces in small towns such as Puente, an agricultural community east of Los Angeles.
Box 6, Folder 1

Raphael Theatre. 1936 - San Raphael.

Box 6, Folder 2

Reforma Theatre - Mexico City

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This theatre and office complex, perhaps taking its name from the Avenida de la Reforma in Mexico City, may be one of Lee's concepts for the Chapultepec Theatre (see 12401-12408) in Mexico City, which was located on the Avenida de la Reforma. The collection contains no photographs of the exterior of the Chapultepec.
Box 6, Folder 3

Reseda Theatre. 1948 - Reseda.

Box 6, Folder 4

Ritz Theatre.

Box 6, Folder 5

RKO Theatre. 1939 - Los Angeles.

Box 6, Folder 6

Rosemead Theatre - Rosemead.

Box 6, Folder 7

Roxie Theatre. 1939-1940 - Los Angeles.

Box 6, Folder 8

Silverlake Theatre. 1940 - Los Angeles.

Box 6, Folder 9

State Theatre - Pomona.

Box 6, Folder 10

State Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Diego

Physical Description: Auditorium front 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee creates a powerful perspective leading toward the screen by embellishing the walls with flowing wave designs and using ceiling panels that converge above the proscenium.
Box 6, Folder 10

State Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Diego

Creator/Collector: Martel Studio
Physical Description: Auditorium ceiling 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This view of the ceiling shows how Lee enhanced the simple auditorium space with indirect lighting hidden behind the strong curves of the ceiling panels, which were also painted with large-scale swirling designs. The strong symmetry is broken by the center panel, which is purposefully asymmetrical.
Box 6, Folder 10

State Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Auditorium front side 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Scalloped forms conceal indirect lighting along the side walls. The wave forms above reach gigantic proportions as they crash into the proscenium, where the waves become a relief sculpture framing the proscenium arch and the motion picture screen.
Box 6, Folder 10

State Theatre. 1939-1940 - San Diego

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Facade night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The tower is clearly borrowed from Lee's Academy Theatre in Inglewood (1939). This night photograph shows how effective Lee's lighting design was at night.
Box 6, Folder 11

State Theatre - Stockton.

Box 6, Folder 11

State Theatre. 1936 - Stockton

Creator/Collector: Logan Studios
Physical Description: Existing, marquee 8 × 10.

Additional Note

These photographs of the State Theatre in Stockton show a early twentieth-century theatre that was used for stage acts and movies. These photographs were in Lee's collection, because he was asked to submit a proposal for remodeling. The collection contains no records of his remodeling concepts.
Box 6, Folder 11

State Theatre. 1936 - Stockton

Creator/Collector: Logan Studios
Physical Description: Existing, box office 8 × 10.

Additional Note

These photographs of the State Theatre in Stockton show a early twentieth-century theatre that was used for stage acts and movies. These photographs were in Lee's collection, because he was asked to submit a proposal for remodeling. The collection contains no records of his remodeling concepts.
Box 6, Folder 11

State Theatre. 1936 - Stockton

Creator/Collector: Logan Studios
Physical Description: Existing, auditorium front 8 × 10.

Additional Note

These photographs of the State Theatre in Stockton show a early twentieth-century theatre that was used for stage acts and movies. These photographs were in Lee's collection, because he was asked to submit a proposal for remodeling. The collection contains no records of his remodeling concepts.
Box 6, Folder 11

State Theatre. 1936 - Stockton

Creator/Collector: Logan Studios
Physical Description: Existing, auditorium rear 8 × 10.

Additional Note

These photographs of the State Theatre in Stockton show a early twentieth-century theatre that was used for stage acts and movies. These photographs were in Lee's collection, because he was asked to submit a proposal for remodeling. The collection contains no records of his remodeling concepts.
Box 6, Folder 12

Studio Theatre. 1931 - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Drinking fountain 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Candy vending machines of elaborate Art Deco design contrast with the sleek black surround of the drinking fountain.
Box 6, Folder 12

Studio Theatre. 1931 - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Lounge entry 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Automatic photo machines and automatic vending machines epitomized the automatic theme of the Studio. The wallpaper with nude silhouettes added to the stylish atmosphere.
Box 6, Folder 12

Studio Theatre. 1931 - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's Moderne theatre façade set into the façade of a French Revival style building located next to a Spanish Colonial style building on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood epitomizes the competition of forms for attention on the commercial streetscape of Los Angeles.
Box 6, Folder 12

Studio Theatre. 1931 - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Air conditioning system 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Revealing the mechanical equipment through a glass wall was an innovation in 1931.
Box 6, Folder 12

Studio Theatre. 1931 - Hollywood

Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Another rendering of the Art Deco façade.
Box 6, Folder 12

Studio Theatre. 1931 - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This hard-edged rendering presents a sleek, brightly illuminated concept for the Studio Theatre.
Box 6, Folder 12

Studio Theatre. 1931 - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: published
Physical Description: Photo collage 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Published photographs of the finished theatre show how Lee used both styles by combining sleek lines with angular abstract patterns. The upward slanting marquee creates in lights the elaborate pattern of overlapping circles that stands out in the daylight.
Box 6, Folder 12

Studio Theatre. 1931 - Hollywood

Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's concept for this small, jewel-box like theatre was to create a rich Art Deco façade. Called an automatic theatre the theatre had automatic vending machines and other innovations. Sketches for the design (237001-237009) show both interior and exterior schemes and details.
Box 6, Folder 13

Sunkist Theatre. 1931 - Pomona.

Box 6, Folder 14

Temple Theatre. 1940 - Temple City.

Box 6, Folder 15

Sierra Theatre - Delano.

Box 6, Folder 16

Newman Theatre - Newman.

Box 6, Folder 17

Nicaragua Theatre - Managua, Nicaragua.

Box 6, Folder 18

North Long Beach Theatre.

Box 6, Folder 19

Santa Ana Theatre.

Box 6, Folder 20

Santa Maria Theatre.

Box 6, Folder 21

Woodland Theatre.

Box 6, Folder 22

Woodland, Theatre no.2. n.d. - Woodland.

Box 6, Folder 23

Rialto Theatre - (Becchetti), Cottonwood, Arizona.

Box 6, Folder 24

Calvi Theatre. 1940 - Lennox, California

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Front elevation, sketch 8 × 10.
Box 6, Folder 25

Schreiber Theatre.

Box 6, Folder 26

Wurlitzer Theatre. 1928 - Cincinnati, Ohio

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Elevation Alternate design[1] 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee did two schemes for this theatre, office tower, and retail complex, planned for Cincinnati. Many studies for the design are also included in the collection.
Box 6, Folder 27

Tower Theatre. 1935-1936 - Compton

Creator/Collector: Watson Airfotos
Physical Description: Auditorium, side rear 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Designed for a working class community in Los Angeles, the Tower Theater is a modest design which presents a stylish black and white Deco exterior (62701). The night view shows the effective use of neon and spotlighting to illuminate the fluted Moderne tower (62702). The box office is surrounded by circles of light bulbs on the lobby ceiling and a sunburst design on the lobby's terrazzo floor (62703). Poster cases are framed by scrolled pediments and simulated columns. The interior uses exaggerated columns, mirrors, white traditional-style furniture, and gilt to suggest a palatial elegance that is distant from the lives of the theatre's clientele (62704-62705). Hanging lanterns and striped upholstery in the auditorium impart a subdued elegance (62706- 62707).
Box 6, Folder 27

Tower Theatre. 1935-1936 - Compton

Creator/Collector: Watson Airfotos
Physical Description: Facade day 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Designed for a working class community in Los Angeles, the Tower Theater is a modest design which presents a stylish black and white Deco exterior (62701). The night view shows the effective use of neon and spotlighting to illuminate the fluted Moderne tower (62702). The box office is surrounded by circles of light bulbs on the lobby ceiling and a sunburst design on the lobby's terrazzo floor (62703). Poster cases are framed by scrolled pediments and simulated columns. The interior uses exaggerated columns, mirrors, white traditional-style furniture, and gilt to suggest a palatial elegance that is distant from the lives of the theatre's clientele (62704-62705). Hanging lanterns and striped upholstery in the auditorium impart a subdued elegance (62706- 62707).
Box 6, Folder 27

Tower Theatre. 1935-1936 - Compton

Creator/Collector: Watson Airfotos
Physical Description: Facade night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Designed for a working class community in Los Angeles, the Tower Theater is a modest design which presents a stylish black and white Deco exterior (62701). The night view shows the effective use of neon and spotlighting to illuminate the fluted Moderne tower (62702). The box office is surrounded by circles of light bulbs on the lobby ceiling and a sunburst design on the lobby's terrazzo floor (62703). Poster cases are framed by scrolled pediments and simulated columns. The interior uses exaggerated columns, mirrors, white traditional-style furniture, and gilt to suggest a palatial elegance that is distant from the lives of the theatre's clientele (62704-62705). Hanging lanterns and striped upholstery in the auditorium impart a subdued elegance (62706- 62707).
Box 6, Folder 27

Tower Theatre. 1935-1936 - Compton

Creator/Collector: Watson Airfotos
Physical Description: Box office 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Designed for a working class community in Los Angeles, the Tower Theater is a modest design which presents a stylish black and white Deco exterior (62701). The night view shows the effective use of neon and spotlighting to illuminate the fluted Moderne tower (62702). The box office is surrounded by circles of light bulbs on the lobby ceiling and a sunburst design on the lobby's terrazzo floor (62703). Poster cases are framed by scrolled pediments and simulated columns. The interior uses exaggerated columns, mirrors, white traditional-style furniture, and gilt to suggest a palatial elegance that is distant from the lives of the theatre's clientele (62704-62705). Hanging lanterns and striped upholstery in the auditorium impart a subdued elegance (62706- 62707).
Box 6, Folder 27

Tower Theatre. 1935-1936 - Compton

Creator/Collector: Watson Airfotos
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Designed for a working class community in Los Angeles, the Tower Theater is a modest design which presents a stylish black and white Deco exterior (62701). The night view shows the effective use of neon and spotlighting to illuminate the fluted Moderne tower (62702). The box office is surrounded by circles of light bulbs on the lobby ceiling and a sunburst design on the lobby's terrazzo floor (62703). Poster cases are framed by scrolled pediments and simulated columns. The interior uses exaggerated columns, mirrors, white traditional-style furniture, and gilt to suggest a palatial elegance that is distant from the lives of the theatre's clientele (62704-62705). Hanging lanterns and striped upholstery in the auditorium impart a subdued elegance (62706- 62707).
Box 6, Folder 27

Tower Theatre - Compton.

Box 6, Folder 27

Tower Theatre. 1935-1936 - Compton

Creator/Collector: Watson Airfotos
Physical Description: Auditorium, front 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Designed for a working class community in Los Angeles, the Tower Theater is a modest design which presents a stylish black and white Deco exterior (62701). The night view shows the effective use of neon and spotlighting to illuminate the fluted Moderne tower (62702). The box office is surrounded by circles of light bulbs on the lobby ceiling and a sunburst design on the lobby's terrazzo floor (62703). Poster cases are framed by scrolled pediments and simulated columns. The interior uses exaggerated columns, mirrors, white traditional-style furniture, and gilt to suggest a palatial elegance that is distant from the lives of the theatre's clientele (62704-62705). Hanging lanterns and striped upholstery in the auditorium impart a subdued elegance (62706- 62707).
Box 6, Folder 27

Tower Theatre. 1935-1936 - Compton

Creator/Collector: Watson Airfotos
Physical Description: Lounge entry 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Designed for a working class community in Los Angeles, the Tower Theater is a modest design which presents a stylish black and white Deco exterior (62701). The night view shows the effective use of neon and spotlighting to illuminate the fluted Moderne tower (62702). The box office is surrounded by circles of light bulbs on the lobby ceiling and a sunburst design on the lobby's terrazzo floor (62703). Poster cases are framed by scrolled pediments and simulated columns. The interior uses exaggerated columns, mirrors, white traditional-style furniture, and gilt to suggest a palatial elegance that is distant from the lives of the theatre's clientele (62704-62705). Hanging lanterns and striped upholstery in the auditorium impart a subdued elegance (62706- 62707).
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: C. Pop Laval
Physical Description: Etched glass panel 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The etched glass panel depicts a hunter with bow and arrow, a wounded stag and a hunting dog. Lee used this motif in other theatres, such as the Miami Theatre, although the motif seems to bear no relationship to any particular wider theme. The depiction itself, however, suggests a moving picture, with several exposures or frames overlaid on each other.
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Detail, painted panel 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A close-up of the glowing panels reveals that they are not just organic leaf forms. The shapes depict a female nude facing a serpent spiraling up the leaves.
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: C. Pop Laval
Physical Description: Auditorium toward proscenium. Decorations in fluorescent paint 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Note on reverse: Decorations in fluorescent paint, when illuminated by black light, concealed in fixtures, are visible with main lights turned off. Graded shades of blue; ceiling, blue; panels, silver field, fluorescent black ---lighted panels.
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: C. Pop Laval
Physical Description: Exterior day 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The streamlined form of the building accented by a tall tower is similar to concepts for the De Anza in Riverside and the Linda Vista in Mexico City.
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: C. Pop Laval
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee uses curved walls and a curved staircase accentuated by the curved ceiling panels that conceal the indirect lighting.
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: C. Pop Laval
Physical Description: Exterior night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's use of neon was especially effective in this tower with its starburst top, similar to the one at the Alex Theatre in Glendale (10301). Probably the starburst flashed on and off in different colors, creating a beacon for moviegoers.
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: C. Pop Laval
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The auditorium walls curve to enclose the audience. Horizontal lines along the wall accentuate the curves.
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: C. Pop Laval
Physical Description: Lobby 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The curves in the design of the terrazzo floor are repeated in the curves of the neon tubing on the ceiling. The neon would have been especially effective at night.
Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre - Fresno.

Box 6, Folder 28

Tower Theatre. 1938-1939 - Fresno

Creator/Collector: C. Pop Laval
Physical Description: Auditorium entrance 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The etched glass panel depicts a hunter with bow and arrow, a wounded stag and a hunting dog. Lee used this motif in other theatres, such as the Miami Theatre, although the motif seems to bear no relationship to any particular wider theme. The depiction itself, however, suggests a moving picture, with several exposures or frames overlaid on each other.
Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre. 1926-27 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dwyer Studio
Physical Description: Construction exterior August 2, 1927 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photos show the odd open steel frame along the top of the building to give it increased strength (70104), the scaffolding along the Broadway elevation (70105), a view down into the interior showing the steel framing (70106), and the process of applying the finish decoration on the balcony interior (70107).
Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre. 1926-27 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dwyer Studio
Physical Description: Construction view from above May 9, 1927 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photos show the odd open steel frame along the top of the building to give it increased strength (70104), the scaffolding along the Broadway elevation (70105), a view down into the interior showing the steel framing (70106), and the process of applying the finish decoration on the balcony interior (70107).
Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre - Los Angeles.

Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre. 1926-27 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Auditorium, decoration 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Comparison with the construction photo (70107) shows how the layers of decoration were built up with plaster, perhaps some cast stone pieces and then elaborate painted designs. The panels clearly represent windows, temporarily curtained for the duration of the performance.
Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre. 1926-27 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Perspective sketch, colored 7 × 9.

Additional Note

This rendering of the Tower Theatre, Lee's first theatre design, shows how effectively he was able to use the narrow lot crowded on both sides by taller buildings. The tower located at the corner advertised the theatre to the public.
Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre. 1926-27 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: published
Physical Description: Exterior 7 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee uses elements of religious architecture, such as the tower, central niche with a statue, the large arched opening and the rows of window along the side of the building, as though to bring as much light into the building as possible, although exactly the opposite was true.
Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre. 1926-27 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dwyer Studio
Physical Description: Construction interior July 16, 1927 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photos show the odd open steel frame along the top of the building to give it increased strength (70104), the scaffolding along the Broadway elevation (70105), a view down into the interior showing the steel framing (70106), and the process of applying the finish decoration on the balcony interior (70107).
Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre. 1926-27 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: published
Physical Description: Theatre Plans (reverse of 0070102 ).
Box 7, Folder 1

Tower Theatre. 1926-27 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dwyer Studio
Physical Description: Construction exterior August 3, 1927 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Construction photos show the odd open steel frame along the top of the building to give it increased strength (70104), the scaffolding along the Broadway elevation (70105), a view down into the interior showing the steel framing (70106), and the process of applying the finish decoration on the balcony interior (70107).
Box 7, Folder 2

Tower Theatre - Santa Rosa.

Box 7, Folder 3

Toys Theatre. 1941 - Helena, Montana.

Box 7, Folder 4

Tujunga Theatre. 1937-1938 - Tujunga.

Box 7, Folder 5

Tumbleweed Theatre. 1939 - Five Points (El Monte)

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The interior of the auditorium featured open trusses, exposed rafters and utilitarian metal light fixtures to lend authenticity to the building. Murals of cowboys and cattle along the side walls added a touch of Hollywood.
Box 7, Folder 5

Tumbleweed Theatre. 1939 - Five Points (El Monte)

Creator/Collector: P.A.C. Photographers
Physical Description: Exterior night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee illuminated the barn to highlight its forms in light and dark. The windmill tower with its illuminated revolving wheel attracted attention from afar, while the tower structure was used to display the name of the theatre. For good measure, a standard box sign on a pylon was added at the street frontage.
Box 7, Folder 5

Tumbleweed Theatre. 1939 - Five Points (El Monte)

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Perspective sketch Architect's original conception 8 × 10.

Additional Note

One of Lee's few realized theme theatres (as in theme restaurant), the Tumbleweed recreates for recent immigrants to Los Angeles the farmstead of the Great Plains. Built on a large site in the rural suburb of El Monte, the theatre's auditorium takes the form of a Midwestern barn, with buttress-like dormers. To attract attention to the theatre, Lee used the form of the Plains windmill, a feature used at every farm to pump water from an underground well. Note on reverse: Architect's original conception --- Note how closely the finished building matches the rendering.
Box 7, Folder 5

Tumbleweed Theatre. 1939 - Five Points (El Monte)

Creator/Collector: P.A.C. Photographers
Physical Description: Aerial view 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This aerial view of Five Points, an important junction in El Monte, shows the site's potential for future commercial development in a thinly populated area.
Box 7, Folder 5

Tumbleweed Theatre. 1939 - Five Points (El Monte)

Creator/Collector: P.A.C. Photographers
Physical Description: Exterior tower 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The windmill tower, built of wood, is a heavier version of the usual graceful metal towers found on the Plains.
Box 7, Folder 5

Tumbleweed Theatre. 1939 - Five Points (El Monte)

Creator/Collector: P.A.C. Photographers
Physical Description: Wishing Well 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The wishing well stood in the yard, in front of the veranda attached to front of the barn which served as a marquee.
Box 7, Folder 5

Tumbleweed Theatre. 1939 - Five Points (El Monte)

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Exterior front Unique Barn Theatre 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Built almost exactly as in the rendering, the Tumbleweed included a wishing well and a rail fence with wagon wheels to complete the farmyard theme.
Box 7, Folder 6

Unicorn Theatre.

Box 7, Folder 7

Valley Theatre. 1934-1935.

Box 7, Folder 8

Vern Theatre. 1939-1941 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Distinctive grilles on side wall handle return air for ventilation. Shiny metallic painted designs on the ceiling and the walls, as well as the shiny surface of the elaborately draped curtain enhance the air of sleekness.
Box 7, Folder 8

Vern Theatre. 1939-1941 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Candy counter 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee designed an unusual self-serve candy counter, which had a slot for customers to deposit 5 cents. Fluorescent lamps illuminate the plaster hood above the candy counter. The hood directs cool air from the air conditioning system over the candy, preventing chocolates from turning color.
Box 7, Folder 8

Vern Theatre. 1939-1941 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The modern spiralling forms in the foyer ceiling are offset by the traditional gilt trim behind the banquette.
Box 7, Folder 8

Vern Theatre. 1939-1941 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Lobby 8 × 10.
Box 7, Folder 8

Vern Theatre. 1939-1941 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Proscenium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Two strips of neon, one blue and one white, in the ceiling cove, illuminate the auditorium. Neon is on a dimmer, which creates a theatrical atmosphere as well as controlling the light during picture operation. Pairs of buxom nudes painted in shiny metallic paint fly along the wall toward the screen.
Box 7, Folder 8

Vern Theatre. 1939-1941 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Box office 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The curving forms of the box office echo others of the same era. The porthole motif appears burnished steel or aluminum entrance doors, the neon circles on the ceiling and the circle design in the terrazzo floor.
Box 7, Folder 8

Vern Theatre. 1939-1941 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Exterior night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

At night the entire front of the theatre, including the tower sign, was brightly illuminated.
Box 7, Folder 8

Vern Theatre. 1939-1941 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Julius Shulman
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee developed a simplified design which relied on the porthole motif to evoke the streamlined character of the great ocean liners of the era. Note on reverse: Exterior, surfaced form concrete. Modern in appearance, it is three tones in color. The ribbed portion was created by casting concrete against corrugated forms.
Box 7, Folder 9

Visalia Theatre. 1946-1949 - Visalia

Physical Description: Exterior night 5 × 7.

Additional Note

At night the brightly illuminated lobby, the large neon sign and the prominent illuminated box office all drew attention to the theatre.
Box 7, Folder 9

Visalia Theatre. 1946-1949 - Visalia

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Rendering, watercolor 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's rendering of this small-town theatre on a corner site in Visalia shows a simple Streamline Moderne two-story building with glass block, tile, curved glass windows and butt-jointed glass box office windows. The flat marquee shows recessed downlights, almost the only feature retained in the final design.
Box 7, Folder 9

Visalia Theatre. 1946-1949 - Visalia

Physical Description: Exterior 5 × 7.

Additional Note

The finished theatre conforms closely to the design of the night-time rendering. The box office and sign focus attention on the corner. The use of artificial brick cladding was fashionable for both commercial and residential building of the period. (See also the Garmar Theatre in Montebello 30301-30305 for similar treatment of the exterior.
Box 7, Folder 9

Visalia Theatre. 1946-1949 - Visalia

Physical Description: Candy counter 5 × 7.

Additional Note

Lee's design for the candy counter incorporated the Streamline Moderne curves initially planned for the exterior. Glass, shiny stainless steel fixtures, curved blond wood veneers and downlights in the ceiling all contribute to the effect.
Box 7, Folder 9

Visalia Theatre. 1946-1949 - Visalia

Physical Description: Auditorium 5 × 7.

Additional Note

The auditorium interior reveals Lee's use of the inexpensive Quonset hut truss system, also used in the Puente Theatre (51101-51110) and the Garmar Theatre ((30301-30305) from the same period. In the immediate post-war period the system was used to build housing, commercial and factory buildings to satisfy the pent-up demand for new construction.
Box 7, Folder 9

Visalia Theatre. 1946-1949 - Visalia

Physical Description: Perspective sketch night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

This night view is a simplified design for a one-story building, retaining the downlighting in the lobby area, but eliminating the curved Streamline effects of the daytime view. Here the sign at the corner becomes the principal element of the design. Lee uses a series of recessed frames highlighted by indirect lighting, around the entire entrance, the poster cases, the false windows on the façade, and above the box office as a unifying motif.
Box 7, Folder 9

Visalia Theatre - Visalia

Physical Description: Foyer 5 × 7.

Additional Note

Lee used the frame motif from the exterior as a central feature in the foyer to advertise coming attractions.
Box 7, Folder 10

Vogue Theatre. 1934-1935 - Hollywood.

Box 7, Folder 11

Vogue Theatre. 1937-1938 - South Gate

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Poster display 8 × 10.

Additional Note

A narrow aisle between the glass wall and the poster wall allows access to change the posters. This photograph reveals that the glass wall is not curved, but instead is composed of a series of flat glass panes butt-jointed together to form a curved shape.
Box 7, Folder 11

Vogue Theatre. 1937-1938 - South Gate

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch, colored 8 × 10.

Additional Note

Lee's rendering for the Vogue Theatre, Vogue Market and Vogue Beauty Shop was executed almost precisely as initially conceived. The elaborate decorations on the tower are in the spirit of Art Deco, but the executed decorations are of a more traditional character. The interior spaces are more streamlined than the exterior design suggests. Both the name Vogue and the details of the interior suggest an elegant experience to the moviegoers of Southgate, an industrial working-class suburb of Los Angeles.
Box 7, Folder 11

Vogue Theatre. 1937-1938 - South Gate

Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The clean lines, light-colored stucco finish and modern typography tie the theatre and retail spaces together.
Box 7, Folder 11

Vogue Theatre. 1937-1938 - South Gate

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Exterior night 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The bright marquee and the tower sign attract attention to the theatre at night. Lee used a similar design for the tower sign on the Tower Theatre in Compton (62701-62707) of 1935-1936.
Box 7, Folder 11

Vogue Theatre. 1937-1938 - South Gate

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Foyer 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The sweeping curves of the foyer are accentuated by the curves and circles of the panels of ceiling lights behind translucent glass and recessed into coves above the fixtures.
Box 7, Folder 11

Vogue Theatre. 1937-1938 - South Gate

Physical Description: Lounge 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The lounge is furnished with an elaborate over-scaled Neo-Baroque banquette topped by a large mirror. Lee often used over-scaled traditional-style furnishings to offset the sleek modernity of the overall design.
Box 7, Folder 11

Vogue Theatre. 1937-1938 - South Gate

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Auditorium 8 × 10.

Additional Note

With plush upholstered seats, touches of gilt and glitter, formal pilasters, and the almost Japanese delicacy of a mural, Lee suggests an atmosphere of elegance to transport the audience from their daily lives.
Box 7, Folder 11

Vogue Theatre. 1937-1938 - South Gate

Physical Description: Lobby, box office 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The curved lines of the design of the terrazzo floor are echoed in the curved wall of the lobby. The posters cases are located behind a wall of glass (71105).
 

Residences

Box 7, Folder 12

Wasco Theatre - Wasco.

Box 8, Folder 1

Apartments [French] - concept

Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 1

Apartments [Deco] - concept

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 1

Apartments Bruce Arms - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Mott Studios
Physical Description: Exterior, 532 S. Hobart, Los Angeles 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 1

Apartments

Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 1

Apartments [Moderne]. 1938 - concept

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 2

Associates Incorporated Apartment - Beverly Hills.

Box 8, Folder 3

Associates Incorporated Residence - Burbank.

Box 8, Folder 4

Boasberg House - Westwood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 4

Boasberg House - Westwood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Living room 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 4

Boasberg House - Westwood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Bedroom 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 4

Boasberg House - Westwood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Stairway 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 5

Tod Browning, Beverly Hills.

Box 8, Folder 6

El Mirador Apartments [California Builders] - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Entry 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 6

El Mirador Apartments [California Builders] - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Setting 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 6

El Mirador Apartments [California Builders] - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Mott Studios
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 7

Cohen House [M.M. Cohen] - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Mott Studios
Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 7

Cohen House [M.M. Cohen] - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Mott Studios
Physical Description: Entry close-up 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 8

Cummings House

Physical Description: Exterior view 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 9

Davis Residence - Monrovia.

Box 8, Folder 10

Deutch Residence.

Box 8, Folder 11

Eudemiller Residence.

Box 8, Folder 12

Goldsmith House [J. Goldsmith] - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Sun room 6 × 8.
Box 8, Folder 12

Goldsmith House [J. Goldsmith] - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Graflex Photo
Physical Description: Exterior front 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 12

Goldsmith House [J. Goldsmith] - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Exterior side elev. 6 × 8.
Box 8, Folder 12

Goldsmith House [J. Goldsmith] - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Dining room 6 × 8.
Box 8, Folder 12

Goldsmith House [J. Goldsmith] - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Living room 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 12

Goldsmith House [J. Goldsmith] - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Bedroom 6 × 8.
Box 8, Folder 12

Goldsmith House [J. Goldsmith] - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Kitchen 6 × 8.
Box 8, Folder 13

Houses.

Box 8, Folder 14

Hungerford (Leo) Residence - Los Angeles.

Box 8, Folder 15

Hunt (Phillip) Residence.

Box 8, Folder 16

Jacob Kalb (Du Barry Apartment.

Box 8, Folder 17

King.

Box 8, Folder 18

Kornhandler.

Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Community room 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dick Whittington
Physical Description: Apt interior, bedroom 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dick Whittington
Physical Description: Apt interior, dining room 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dick Whittington
Physical Description: Lobby desk 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dick Whittington
Physical Description: Writing room 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dick Whittington
Physical Description: Lobby 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dick Whittington
Physical Description: Exterior view 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 19

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925 - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: Dick Whittington
Physical Description: Courtyard, fountain 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 20

Oldknow (Oscar) House. 1936 - Bel Air

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Dining room 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 20

Oldknow (Oscar) House. 1936 - Bel Air

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Living room 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 20

Oldknow (Oscar) House. 1936 - Bel Air

Physical Description: Entrance elevation, sketch 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 20

Oldknow (Oscar) House. 1936 - Bel Air

Physical Description: Exterior view, garden elev. 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 20

Oldknow (Oscar) House. 1936 - Bel Air

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Exterior view, entrance 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 20

Oldknow (Oscar) House. 1936 - Bel Air

Physical Description: Living room 8 × 10
Box 8, Folder 21

Pacht (Isaac) Residence - Los Feliz?.

Box 9, Folder 1

Camrose Apartments (Phillips) - Hollywood.

Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Dining room 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Entry 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Kitchen 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Bathroom 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Built-in radio-phonograph? 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Fireplace 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Dining room 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Concealed bar, opened 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Living room 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 2

Sheehan (Howard) Apartment [Fox Wilshire Theatre Penthouse] - Beverly Hills

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Bedroom 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 3

Sherman (J.W.) Residence - Los Angeles.

Box 9, Folder 4

Silbert (Bruce Arms) Apartment.

Box 9, Folder 5

Simon Residence - Beverly Hills.

Box 9, Folder 6

Troyer Brothers apartment.

Box 9, Folder 7

Universal Holding Company (Lexington Manor Apartments).

Box 9, Folder 8

Universal Holding Company duplexes - Los Angeles.

Box 172

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925-26 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Principal elevation, on linen 27 × 38.
Box 172

Haddon Hall [Oberndorf Apartments]. 1925-26 - Los Angeles

Physical Description: Detail, elevator door frame 16 × 22.
 

Commercial Buildings

 

Mayer Investment (Hollywood - Western Building) - Hollywood

Physical Description: Pencil sketch, perspective, with pastel 30 × 36.
 

Max Factor Building. 1935 - Hollywood

Physical Description: Sheet 2 Sections, interior details 45 × 26.
 

Max Factor Building. 1935 - Hollywood

Physical Description: Rev. Floor Plan Sheet 1A-A 36 × 26.
 

Max Factor Building. 1935 - Hollywood

Physical Description: Detail Sheet 12 46 × 26.
 

Max Factor Building. 1935 - Hollywood

Physical Description: Elevation Sheet 1-Job 351,352 46 × 26.

Additional Note

This elevation drawing shows Lee's Art Deco styling of the Max Factor building façade, which he repeated in his designs for showrooms and furniture. Photographs in the Lee archive show that his remodeling included stylish showrooms planned to complement the complexions and hair coloring of clients, and also a paneled office for the company's chief executive.
 

Max Factor Building. 1935 - Hollywood

Physical Description: Floor plan Sheet 1B 42 × 26.
 

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Physical Description: Neon parking sign, ink/pastel? on tissue 27 × 18.
Box 9, Folder 9

Aero Supplies of Los Angeles, Incorporated.

Box 9, Folder 10

Airplane Club. 1936.

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 11

Baby Shop.

Box 9, Folder 12

Ball Building - Los Angeles.

Box 9, Folder 13

Staber's Beauty Shop [Dr. Barton]

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Storefront 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 14

Berkoff (Dr. Louis) Building - Los Angeles.

Box 9, Folder 15

Blink (R.L.).

Box 9, Folder 16

B'nai B'rith (Beverly Hills Lodge) - Beverly Hills.

Box 9, Folder 17

Bowling Alleys.

Box 9, Folder 18

Bridge Club.

Box 9, Folder 19

Building - Huntington Park.

Box 9, Folder 20

Carv-Arts

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Storefront 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 21

Darby Company factory building.

Box 9, Folder 22

De Mille [Store Building]

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10
Box 9, Folder 22

De Mille [Store Building]

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Rendering 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 23

Lee (Don) Cadillac Showroom.

Box 9, Folder 24

Easterday Supply Company Factory.

Box 9, Folder 25

Epstein Building.

Box 9, Folder 26

Esnard (Paul) Professional Building.

Box 9, Folder 27

Chrysler Showroom [Fred Fudge].

Box 9, Folder 28

General Water Heater - Hollywood

Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 28

General Water Heater Building - Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Bird's eye rendering 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 28

General Water Heater Building - Hollywood.

Box 9, Folder 28

General Water Heater - Hollywood

Physical Description: Façade 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 29

Globe Department Store.

Box 9, Folder 30

Greene ' Hinkle Store - Beverly Hills.

Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Cocktail lounge 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Bowling area 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Exterior 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Spectator seats 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Luncheonette 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Inside view of front entrance 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Bowling alleys 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Creator/Collector: W.P. Woodcock
Physical Description: Pylon sign 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 31

Tower Bowl (A.J. Hanson) Bowling Alley - San Diego

Physical Description: Exterior night 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 32

Harn of California.

Box 9, Folder 33

Hilton (E.G.) Automobile Showroom.

Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Physical Description: Exterior rendering 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Creator/Collector: J.A. Fraser
Physical Description: Kitchen 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Interior rendering, lunch counter, Wayne McAllister, Associate 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Interior rendering, bar, Wayne McAllister, Associates 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Interior rendering, booths, Wayne McAllister, Assoc. 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Creator/Collector: J.A. Fraser
Physical Description: Booths 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Creator/Collector: J.A. Fraser
Physical Description: Bar 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Creator/Collector: J.A. Fraser
Physical Description: Lunch counter 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 34

Melody Lane Restaurant - [Hollywood ' Vine], Hollywood

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Interior rendering, stair, Wayne McAllister Assoc. 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 35

Harwin's Jewelers [Carl Horwitz]. 1944.

Physical Description: Facade 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 35

Harwin's Jewelers [Carl Horwitz]. 1944.

Creator/Collector: Hoffman-Luckhaus
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 35

Harwin's Jewelers [Carl Horwitz]. 1944.

Physical Description: Interior 8 × 10.
Box 9, Folder 36

Horwitz Market - Van Nuys.

Box 9, Folder 37

Hosiery Finishers, Incorporated - Los Angeles.

Box 9, Folder 38

Houston (W.W.) Factory.

Box 9, Folder 39

International Business Machines.

Box 9, Folder 40

Fairfax Storage [Carl Jacobs].

Box 10, Folder 1

Kolmitz - Westwood

Physical Description: Perspective sketch, storefront 8 × 10.

Additional Note

The Lee collection contains a number of photographs of theatres that Lee was charged with remodeling. This series of photos of a turn-of-the-century vaudeville theatre illustrates by contrast the innovations developed by architects for motion picture theatres. The entry to these older theatres was often off the street, through a long hallway. Advertising displays were merely cardboard signs.
Box 10, Folder 2

Desert Club [La Quinta Development] - La Quinta

Physical Description: Lounge 8 × 10.
Box 10, Folder 2

Desert Club [La Quinta Development] - La Quinta

Physical Description: Restaurant 8 × 10.
Box 10, Folder 2

Desert Club [La Quinta Development] - La Quinta

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Pool 8 × 10.
Box 10, Folder 2

Desert Club [La Quinta Development] - La Quinta

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Bird's eye rendering 8 × 10.
Box 10, Folder 2

Desert Club [La Quinta Development] - La Quinta

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Rendering, 2nd unit 8 × 10.
Box 10, Folder 3

Landau Building. 1927.

Creator/Collector: Luckhaus Studio
Physical Description: Perspective sketch 8 × 10.
Box 10, Folder 4

Lawson.

Box 10, Folder 5

Laykin et Cie.

Box 10, Folder 6

Le Roy's [Le Roy Diamond] - Los Angeles

Creator/Collector: S. Charles Lee
Physical Description: Before remodel 8 × 10.
Physical Description: Remodeled facade 8 × 10.
Box 10, Folder 7

Lee (S. Charles) Office Building