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Collection Guide
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Inventory of the Gustav Schultz Sanctuary Collection, 1971-72, 1981-90
GTU 90-5-01  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The majority of the collection concerns the sanctuary movement for Central American refugees. Sanctuary for military personnel is a small, though significant, part of the collection. This collection was obtained from the donor's office. Material was received in 3-ring binders, file folders, and loose. See container listing for arrangement notations.
Background
Gustav H. Schultz was born 1935 in Foley, Alabama, receiving his education at Concordia Theological Seminary and Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. He served pastorates in Georgia and Illinois before becoming pastor of the University Lutheran Chapel, Berkeley, California in 1969. This period saw a growing movement against participation in the Vietnam Conflict as an immoral, illegal, and undeclared war, and the increasing identity of the church with the moral and ethical issues of choice within the individual conscience. Responding to this, the University Lutheran Chapel, under Schultz's leadership, with the support of other churches in the area and the city of Berkeley, declared a formal resolution of sanctuary. Sanctuary offered "the availability of shelter and sustenance to military personnel who are conscientiously unable to continue their participation in the armed forces or in combat duties." (Resolution, Nov. 7, 1971: See, Box 1 ff 9)
Restrictions
Copyright has not been assigned to The Graduate Theological Union. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of The Graduate Theological Union as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the reader.
Availability
Collection is open for research.