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Finding Aid for the Ida E. Wickenden Papers, 1903-1962
885  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
Ida E. Wickenden (1886-ca.1972) spent her early years in Toledo, Ohio. Her interest in missionary work began as a college student, with her involvement in the Young Women's Christian Association. In November of 1906 she traveled to Nashville to attend a missionary convention, and a year later she sailed for Hangchow, China to begin work there as a missionary. In 1911, her letters to her family made an American newspaper for their descriptions of the Republican Revolution, which transferred power from the Manchu dynasty to Chinese rule under Sun Yet Sen. The collection consists mostly of correspondence from Ida E. Wickenden and other hand-written and printed materials relating to the time she spent as missionary in Hangchow, China. Also included are a Wickenden family history, miscellaneous correspondence, photographs of China, photographic portraits of Ida E. Wickenden during her missionary years, photographic postcards, and photocopies of three volumes of transcribed correspondence entitled, “Letters from China, 1907-1913: Ida E. Wickenden to members of her family”.
Background
Ida E. Wickenden was born February 11, 1886, the third of eight children born to Thomas R. Wickenden and Ida Consual Wickenden. According to a Wickenden family history, Thomas R. Wickenden's family ancestry was English Roman Catholic and French Huguenot; Ida Consual Wickenden was of Spanish Huguenot, Dutch, and Quaker descent. Ida spent her early years in Toledo, Ohio. Her interest in missionary work began as a college student, with her involvement in the Young Women's Christian Association. In November of 1906 she traveled to Nashville to attend a missionary convention; a year later she sailed for Hangchow, China to begin work there as a missionary. Ida stayed in Hangchow for just over five years, during which she taught at a Baptist girl's school. In 1911 her letters to her family made an American newspaper for their descriptions of the Republican Revolution, which transferred power from the Manchu dynasty to Chinese rule under Sun Yet Sen. Ida wrote to her family frequently throughout her stay in China. In June of 1913 Ida left Hangchow, traveling by train across Siberia to Moscow and then to Berlin. She met her sister, Lottie Wickenden, in England. From there they traveled to Scotland and Paris. Ida married Justin Wroe Nixon in June of 1914 after her return to the United States. The Nixons lived first in Minneapolis, Minnesota and then in Rochester, New York. They had five children, all of whom, except the first, were born in Rochester. Ida and Justin Sr. traveled together in Europe and Turkey after his retirement in 1954. They were married for 40 years until Justin's death in 1958. Ida spent her latter years in a retirement community in Pomona, California and died about 1972. Ida E. Wickenden was born February 11, 1886. She was the third of eight children born to Thomas R. Wickenden and Ida Consual Wickenden. According to a Wickenden family history, Thomas R. Wickenden's family ancestry was English Roman Catholic and French Huguenot; Ida Consual Wickenden was of Spanish Huguenot, Dutch, and Quaker descent.
Extent
3 boxes (1.5 linear ft.)
Availability
COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Advance notice required for access.