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Guide to the Douglas Engelbart Symposia Records
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Collection Contents

Box 1

Accession ARCH-1999-073 "Engelbart's Unfinished Revolution" records 1998 Dec 9

Scope and Content Note

Brochures and handouts from the symposia, clippings, press releases, press kit, and photographs from the event.

Biography/Organization History

On December 9th, 1998 Stanford University Libraries and the Institute for the Future presented a day-long, public symposium that brought together Engelbart and members of his historic team, along with other computer visionaries, to consider the impact of Engelbart's work on the last three decades of the computer revolution, to explore the challenges facing us today, and to speculate about the next three decades.
 

Accession ARCH-2005-231 "Engelbart's Unfinished Revolution" videorecordings 1998 Dec 9

"Engelbart's Unfinished Revolution" videorecordings, 1998 Dec 9

Box 2

561.2 Session 1 1998

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (Betacam-SP L)

Scope and Content Note

Session 1: 9:00-10:40 Morning
9:00 Greeting and Introductions from Condoleezza Rice, Michael A. Keller, Paul Saffo (Moderator) 9:15 Panel Discussion on the 1968 Demo: Engelbart, Brand, English, Irby, Rulifson 10:15 Tim Lenoir
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 2U

Use copy

Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

561.3 Session 2

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (Betacam-SP L)

Scope and Content Note

Session 2: 11:00-12:40 Morning
11:00 Panel Discussion on the Last 30 Years: Andreessen, Caruso, Nielson, Rheingold, Zappacosta 11:40 Alan Kay 12:10 Panel Discussion on New Horizons: Card, Drexler, Evans, Horn, Markoff
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 3U

Use copy

Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

561.4 Session 3a

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (Betacam-SP L)

Scope and Content Note

Session 3: 2:00-3:30 Afternoon
2:00 Unfinished Revolution Conversation: Engelbart, Rulifson 2:30 Ted Nelson 3:00 Andy van Dam
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 4U

Use copy

Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

561.5 Session 3b

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (Betacam-SP)
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 5U

Use copy

Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

561.6 Session 4

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (Betacam-SP L)

Scope and Content Note

Session 4: 3:50-5:30 Afternoon
3:50 Terry Winograd 4:20 Stewart Brand 4:50 Jaron Lanier 5:20 Closing Remarks 5:30 Adjourn
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 6U

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Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

561.7 1968 Presentation Highlights

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (Betacam-SP)

Scope and Content Note

Highlighs from December 9, 1968 presentation during which Doug Engelbart and a small team of researchers from the Stanford Research Institute stunned the computing world with an extraordinary demonstration at a San Francisco computer conference. They debuted: the computer mouse, graphical user interface, display editing and integrated text and graphics, hyper-documents, and two-way video-conferencing with shared workspaces. These concepts and technologies were to become the cornerstones of modern interactive computing.
That landmark 1968 demonstration took place at the American Federation of Information Processing Societies' Fall Joint Computer Conference. At a time when computers were little more than huge number-crunchers, Engelbart and his team's introduction of their two-way interactive system, called NLS (for oN Line System) was a shock.
Today the mouse, graphical user interface, hyper-documents, display editing and integrated text and graphics are taken for granted. Other features of NLS, such two-way video-conferencing with shared workspaces, remain more vision than reality even today. And some of NLS' most important elements, such as the concept of bootstrapping, remain so novel that they are all but unknown to the current generation of systems designers.
NLS' 1968 demo was a watershed that fundamentally changed the trajectory of the computing revolution, contributing not only ideas, but also many of the people who would later build the systems we would use today. Alumni of the NLS project (and its successor, the Augment project) include many of the most influential figures in Silicon Valley (and elsewhere). Others credit Doug's work in general, and the 1968 demo in particular with influencing their design philosophies. As personal computing pioneer and visionary Alan Kay once observed, "I don't know what Silicon Valley will do when it runs out of Doug's ideas."
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 7U

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Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

561.8 Video roll-ins

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (Betacam-SP L)
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 8U

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Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

561.9 News clips re: 30th anniversary of the mouse 1998 Dec 6-13

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (VHS)

Scope and Content Note

CBS This Morning (3:27); Newscenter Four Nightbeat (:48); ZDTV Network News(5:05); The Screen Savers (7:20); Silicon Valley Business (4:26; 1:23); Fox X-Press (:17)
 

Accession ARCH-2011-080 "Boosting Collective IQ" videorecordings and slides 2008 Aug 4-22

"Boosting Collective IQ" videorecordings and slides, 2008 Aug 4-22

Scope and Content Note

In August 2008 the Doug Engelbart Institute sponsored an extended three way discussion between leading experts Doug Engelbart, Jeff Rulifson, and Christina Engelbart, drilling down into the depths of Doug's vision using the Bootstrap "Paradigm Map" interactive slide presentation. This informal discussion, spanning four days, was filmed in a TV studio at Stanford University.
The Bootstrap "Paradigm Map" is Doug Engelbart's interactive visual portrayal of his call to action, depicting his vision and strategy for dramatically raising our Collective IQ toward more effective organizations and a better world.
 

Videorecordings

Box 2

Session 1 of 4 2008 Aug 4

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (DVCAM)

Scope and Content Note

From the Bootstrap Dialogs Project – Doug Engelbart, Jeff Rulifson, and Christina Engelbart discuss the Bootstrap "Paradigm Map" in-depth at Stanford Video - Stanford University's television studios.
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 1U

Use copy

Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

Session 2 of 4 2008 Aug 6

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (DVCAM)
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 2U

Use copy

Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

Session 3 of 4 2008 Aug 8

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (DVCAM)
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 3U

Use copy

Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
Box 2

Session 4 of 4 2008 Aug 22

Physical Description: 1 videotape(s) (DVCAM)
 

Duplicating master

Physical Description: 1 computer file(s) (MP4)
Box 4U

Use copy

Physical Description: 1 optical disc(s) (DVD)
 

Slides

 

PDF format minus the animation

 

PowerPoint slideshow with animation