Finding Aid for the Edmund H. North Papers, 1934-1968

Processed by Manuscripts Division staff; machine-readable finding aid created by Caroline Cubé and edited by Josh Fiala.
UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections
Manuscripts Division
Room A1713, Charles E. Young Research Library
Box 951575
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1575
Email: spec-coll@library.ucla.edu
URL: http://www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/special/scweb/
© 2005
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.


Descriptive Summary

Title: Edmund H. North Papers,
Date (inclusive): 1934-1968
Collection number: 1076
Creator: North, Edmund H., 1911-
Extent: 4 boxes (2.0 linear ft.)
Abstract: Edmund Hall North (1911-1990) was a free-lance screenwriter (1934- ), and served as president of the screen branch of the Writers Guild of America, West (1956-57). He won the Screen Writers Guild Award for “One night of love”, and won the Screen Writers Guild Award and Academy Award for best story and screenplay for “Patton” in 1970. The collection consists of 40 screenplays and related material by Edmund H. North. Also contains eleven scripts of orientation films made by the Signal Corps for the War Department during World War II, some of which were written by North, who also produced them.
Repository: University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.
Los Angeles, California 90095-1575
Physical location: Stored off-site at SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to the collection. Please contact the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Advance notice required for access.

Restrictions on Use and Reproduction

Property rights to the physical object belong to the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Edmund H. North Papers (Collection 1076). Department of Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA.

UCLA Catalog Record ID

UCLA Catalog Record ID: 4233510 

Biography

Edmund Hall North was born March 12, 1911, in New York City; attended Stanford University (1928-30); became a free-lance screenwriter in 1934, when he won the Screen Writers Guild Award for, “One night of love”; served as president of the screen branch of the Writers Guild of America, West (1956-57); won Screen Writers Guild Award and Academy Award for best story and screenplay for “Patton” in 1970; he died on August 18, 1990 in Santa Monica, California.

Scope and Content

Collection consists of 40 screenplays and related material by Edmund H. North. Includes “One night of love”, “Young man with a horn”, “Flamingo road”, “Dark canyon (released as “Colorado Territory”)”, “In a lonely place”, “Only the valiant”, “The day the earth stood still”, “Blue horizons” (released as “The far horizons”), “Destry”, “The proud ones”, “Reminiscences of a cowboy” (released as “Cowboy”), “Pilots for hire” (released as “The lady takes a flyer”), and “Sink the Bismarck!”, and several drafts of the screenplay, “Patton”, written with Francis Ford Coppola. Also contains eleven scripts of orientation films made by the Signal Corps for the War Department during World War II, some of which were written by North, who also produced them.

Indexing Terms

The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.

Subjects

North, Edmund H., 1911- --Archives.
Screenwriters--California--Los Angeles--Archival resources.

Genres and Forms of Material

Film scripts.


Container List

Box 1

Script of One Night of Love.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Columbia in 1934, starring Grace Moore, directed by Victor Schertzinger. It was the first --- and the most successful --- of the operatic musicals.
Box 1

2 scripts of Young Man With A Horn.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Warner Bros. in 1947, starring Kirk Douglas, lauren Bacall and doris Day, directed by Michael Curtiz.
This is a writer's working script, and included is a letter from the author of the novel, Dorothy Baker, to the producer of the picture, Jerry Wald, discussing my script in some detail.
Box 1

Script of Flamingo Road.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Warner Bros. in 1947, starring Joan Crawford and directed by Vincent Sherman.
Box 1

Script of Dark Canyon.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Warner Bros. in 1948, and released as Colorado Territory. Starred Joel McCrea and Virginia Mayo.
Box 1

Script of In A Lonely Place.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Columbia in 1949, starring Humphrey Bogart. Directed by Nick Ray.
Box 1

Script of Only the Valiant.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Warner Bros. in 1949, starring Gregory Peck.
Box 2

Story outline entitled Farewell to the Master.

Scope and Content Note

This outline was the basis for the screenplay The Day the Earth Stood Still.
This picture, released by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1950, starred Michael Rennie and Patricia neal and was directed by robert wise. This film was one of the first and is considered by many critics to be the best of the science fiction pictures.
Box 2

Script of The Day the Eart Stood Still. January 9, 1951

Box 2

Script of Blue Horizons.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Paramount in 1954 as The Far Horizons. It starred Charlton Heston and Fred MacMurray and was directed by Rudy Mate.
Box 2

Script of Destry.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Universal in 1954, starried Audie Murphy.
Box 2

Script of The Proud Ones.

Scope and Content Note

Produced by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1955.
Box 2

Script of Reminiscences of a Cowboy.

Scope and Content Note

Released by Columbia as Cowboy in 1958, starring Glenn Ford as Jack Lemmon.
Box 2

Script of Pilots for Hire.

Scope and Content Note

Produced and released as The Lady Takes a Flyer by Universal in 1956.
Box 2

Script of Sink the Bismarck!

Scope and Content Note

Produced in England for Twentieth Century-Fox in 1959, starring Kenneth More and Dana Wynter and directed by Lewis Gilbert.
“I spent a couple of months in the archives of the British Admiralty working with technical experts there to insure accuracy. The result was that this very compicated naval engagement was portrayed precisely as it happened, each movement of the many ships engaged being accounted for accurately.”
 

[Orientation Films]

Scope and Content Note

“The following eleven scripts might be of interest as examples of orientation films made by the Signal Corps for the War Department during World War II. As a major in the signal Corps, I produced these films and wrote many of them.”
Box 2

Script of Baptism of Fire. January 6, 1943

Scope and Content Note

“This film attempted to prepare the soldier for his first encounter with the enemy.”
Box 2

Script of Cracking Tanks. October 1, 1942

Scope and Content Note

“This film showed how infantrymen can deal with an enemy tank attack.”
Box 2

Script of How To Get Killed in One Easy Lesson. October 1, 1942

Scope and Content Note

“This film illustrates a series of 'dont's' for the combat soldier.”
Box 2

Script of Kill Or Be Killed. December 1, 1942

Scope and Content Note

“A film treatise on hand-to-hand combat and dirty fighting.”
Box 2

Script of Secret Weapon. March 26, 1943

Scope and Content Note

“A film on the importance of taking that one extra step, firing that one extra shot.”
Box 2

Script of Keep it Clean. october 1, 1942

Scope and Content Note

“A film illustrating the vital importance of keeping your rifle clean.”
Box 3

Script of It's Your America. October 6, 1944

Scope and Content Note

“A booster shot in citizenship for post-hostilities occupation troops.”
Box 3

Script of Don't Be A Sucker. February 19, 1945

Scope and Content Note

“This film on racial and religious tolerance was made for the War Department and subsequently released to the public by Paramount.”
Box 3

Script of Your Next job. September 14, 1944

Scope and Content Note

“A picture on post-hostilities vocational guidance.”
Box 3

Script of Follow Me Again. July 14, 1944

Scope and Content Note

“A film for leaders of post-hostilities education program.”
Box 3

Script of Opportunity Knocks Again. July 14, 1944

Scope and Content Note

“A film outlining the educational program.”
Box 3

Script of Negro Soldier in Eto. July 17, 1945

Scope and Content Note

“A filmed account of the contribution made by Negro soldiers in all phases of the European campaign.”
Box 3

Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Scope and Content Note

(Twentieth Century-Fox, not yet produced)
“This is an epic naval story of the biggest sea battle of World War II, and in preparing it I did a great deal of research, both in the Defense Department in Washington and also with the Commanders of the Japan Self Defense force in tokyo. I have the entire file of material on this project, from my original plan for the screenplay based on C.S. Forester's account straight through to the revised final script., in addition to much research material. This represents an unusually complete package and would give the student a good view of the preparation of a highly technical subject, from inception through research to the final script.”
Box 3

Treatment of Battle of Leyte Gulf by C.S. Forester, of Captain Horatio Hornblower fame. September 26, 1960

Box 3

A plan for the screenplay, by E.H.N. February 15, 1961

Scope and Content Note

Includes a chronology of the battle and a detailed description of the characters and how they function in the story.
Box 3

Four scripts, including Writer's Working Script, First draft screenplay, final screenplay and revised final screenplay. March 16, 1961; June 15, 1961; September 29, 1961; May 10, 1962

Box 3

A declassified Navy Department official chronology of the battle.

Box 3

A bibliography of research materials.

Box 3

Letter from Office of Secretary of Defense. January 31, 1962

Scope and Content Note

Letter is notifying studio that script has been reviewed and approved for production with full Navy cooperation assured.
Box 3

Book describing the battle written by Vice Admiral Tomiji Koyahage, Chief of Staff to Admiral Kurita, commander of the Japanese Fleet.

Scope and Content Note

“Admiral Koyanage inscribed this copy to me in Japanese and included a photograph of himself with Admiral Kurita and staff.”
Box 3

Envelope containing other research material, notes, etc.

 

Patton

Scope and Content Note

A top-budget roadshow picture, to be released by Twentieth Century-Fox in February of 1970, based on the World War II career of General George S. Patton, Jr. This picture stars George C. Scott and Karl Mauldin (Scott playing Patton and Mauldin playing General Omar N. Bradley).
The picture was directed by Franklin Schaffner and produced by Frank McCarthy.
“General Bradley himself acted as Senior Military Adviser, and we worked with him throughout the preparation of the final script.”
“I prepared the final script, using material contained in a script written by Francis Ford Coppola. (At no point did we actually work together.) The material is as follows:”
Box 4

First draft of screenplay by Francis Ford Coppola. December 27, 1965

Scope and Content Note

“This copy has notes, in my handwriting, of cuts and revisions suggested by Darryl F. Zanuck to mcCarthy, Schaffner and North in Antibes, France, in June 1968.”
Box 4

Revised screenplay. July 8, 1968

Scope and Content Note

“With notes in my hand, indicating comments and suggestions made by General Omar N. Bradley (who is portrayed as a character in the picture).”
Box 4

Second revised screenplay. October 24, 1968

Box 4

Third revised screenplay. December 10, 1968

Scope and Content Note

“With my handwritten notes indicating revisions suggested by George C. Scott, the actor who plays Patton.”
Box 4

Final Screenplay. January 1, 1969

Box 4

Shooting script. February 1, 1969

Box 4

Long research memorandum from Frank McCarthy, producer of the picture, who had been working on the project for over fifteen years. October 4, 1967

Box 4

Exchange of telegrams between Darryl F. Zanuck and Richard Zanuck, head of production re various phases of development.

Box 4

Research material from General Bradley and also from the Pentagon on various subjects.

Box 4

Copious writer's notes regarding source material, patton's speeches, miscellaneous items, some in long hand.