Jump to Content

Collection Guide
Collection Title:
Collection Number:
Get Items:
Finding Aid of the Maude Emily Glass Papers
1140  
View entire collection guide What's This?
PDF (123.12 Kb) HTML
Search this collection
Collection Overview
 
Table of contents What's This?
Description
Born Maude Emily Taylor in 1897, Maude Emily Glass began writing in her youth, inspired by advice given in letters from Julian Hawthorne, the son of Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a television drama based on the life of her friend Ruth St. Denis, did ghostwriting and screenwriting, was an original member of the Pasadena Playhouse, and published (under the pseudonym Emily Harvin) her most widely-read work, The stubborn wood (1948), a novel dealing with the treatment of patients in mental institutions. The collection consists of Glass' correspondence, manuscripts, screen treatments, photographs, and research materials.
Background
Born Maude Emily Taylor in 1897, Maude Emily Glass began writing in her youth, inspired by advice given in letters from Julian Hawthorne, the son of Nathaniel Hawthorne; as a friend of the Wilshire family she planned first a biography of Gaylord, and then of Mary Wilshire, but finished neither project; wrote a television drama based on the life of her friend Ruth St. Denis; did ghostwriting and screenwriting; original member, Pasadena Playhouse; published (under the pseudonym Emily Harvin) her most widely-read work, The stubborn wood (1948), a novel dealing with the treatment of patients in mental institutions.Maude Emily Glass was born Maude Emily Taylor, the initials of which formed her nickname, Met, and also one of the many pseudonyms under which she wrote. After her marriage to Charles Ray Glass, she led a life “carefree and advantaged, interests no wider than children, books, golf, and horses.” Even in her youth, though, she wrote continually, and those manuscripts were preserved by Emily Glass along with later, published manuscripts. Also in this collection are letters from friends of her youth, among them the son of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Julian Hawthorne. She later praised his “invaluable guidance in choice of reading matter” and stated: “I feel that any worth my writing has, or may have, will largely be due to his influence and suggestions.”
Extent
5 boxes (2.5 linear ft.)
Restrictions
Property rights to the physical object belong to the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.
Availability
COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Advance notice required for access.