INVENTORY OF THE COLBY E. "BABE" SLATER COLLECTION, 1906-2001, (bulk 1917-1957)

Melissa Tyler
Department of Special Collections
General Library
100 North West Quad
University of California, Davis
Davis, CA 95616-5292
Phone: (530) 752-1621
Fax: (530) 754-5758
Email: speccoll@lib.ucdavis.edu
June 2004 ©2004
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

Note


INVENTORY OF THE COLBY E. "BABE" SLATER COLLECTION, 1906-2001(bulk 1917-1957)

D-394

Department of Special Collections

General Library

University of California, Davis

Davis, California

Contact Information:

  • Department of Special Collections
  • General Library
  • 100 North West Quad
  • University of California, Davis
  • Davis, CA 95616-5292
  • Phone: (530) 752-1621
  • Fax: (530) 754-5758
  • Email: speccoll@lib.ucdavis.edu
Processed and encoded by:
Melissa Tyler
Date Completed:
June 2004
©2004 The Regents of the University of California

Descriptive Summary

Title: The Colby E. "Babe" Slater Collection,
Date (inclusive): 1906-2001
Date (bulk): (bulk 1917-1957)
Collection number: D-394
Creator: Slater, Colby E.
Extent: 5.3 linear feet
Repository: University of California, Davis. General Library. Dept. of Special Collections.
100 North West Quad
Davis, California, 95616-5292
Abstract: Colby E. "Babe" Slater (1896-1965) graduated from the University Farm School (now the University of California, Davis) in 1917. He served with the United States Army Medical Corps in France during the First World War. An outstanding athlete, Slater won Olympic gold medals for rugby in 1920 and 1924. Around 1927, he bought land in Clarksburg, California where he farmed for many years. Slater was active in organizations associated with athletics; agriculture; the University of California, Davis; and Yolo County, California. The Colby E. "Babe" Slater Collection (1906-2001, bulk 1917-1957) contains correspondence, diaries, publications, ephemera, photographic material, and realia. Most of the collection pertains to Slater and the United States Olympic Rugby Team winning gold medals at the Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium (1920) and Paris (1924). The collection also includes material related to the history of the University of California, Davis; the First World War; agriculture; and the history of Yolo County, California.
Physical location: Researchers should contact Special Collections to request collections, as many are stored off site.
Language: English.

Administrative Information

Access

Collection is open for research under regular Reading Room rules and copyright restrictions.

Publication Rights

Copyright is protected by the copyright law, chapter 17 of the U.S. Code. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Head of Special Collections. Permission for publication is given on behalf of Special Collections, General Library, University of California, Davis as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the researcher.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Colby E. "Babe" Slater Collection, D-394, Department of Special Collections, University of California Library, Davis, California.

Acquisition Information

In December 2003, Marilyn Slater McCapes and Richard H. McCapes gave the Colby E. "Babe" Slater collection to Special Collections at the General Library of the University of California, Davis.

Processing Information

Melissa Tyler processed this collection and created its finding aid.

Biography

Biographical Narrative

Colby E. "Babe" Slater, was born on April 30, 1896 in Berkeley, California to Louise and John Slater. Babe, the youngest child, had two brothers and a sister. The Slaters lived in San Francisco before moving to Berkeley. The family's fortunes reversed when John Slater, a prosperous sea captain, died in 1908. Babe and his older brother Norman attended Berkeley High School, played on the school's athletic teams, and participated in sporting events on the University of California campus. In 1911 and 1912, Babe Slater led the Berkeley High School rugby team to county, regional, and state titles.
In 1914, Babe Slater enrolled at the University Farm School in Davis (now the University of California, Davis). The University Farm School, a branch of the University of California's College of Agriculture, offered a three-year course in the principles and practices of agriculture. While at the University Farm, Slater starred in rugby, football, basketball, and baseball. He served as Basketball Team Captain, Junior Class President, House Manager for the Calpha Fraternity, Thanksgiving Day Special Chairman, Picnic Day Parade Chairman, and Picnic Day General Chairman.
When Slater graduated from the University Farm School in May 1917, the First World War was underway. America declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917. Slater registered for the newly instated draft in June 1917, enlisted in the United States Army in September, and was promoted to Corporal in November. In the spring of 1918, he led a group of Yolo County "Liberty Boys" as they traveled by train from Woodland, California to Camp Lewis, American Lake, Washington, where they underwent intensive training for war. Slater's company arrived in Southampton, England on July 19, 1918 and then spent a few days at a rest camp in Cherbourg, France. Slater served with the Medical Corps, and he and his company were "on the move" from July to November in France and Belgium, tending to wounded soldiers, evacuating them from battlefields to hospitals, and setting up dressing stations. Often they came under fire from German aircraft and shelling since they had to work near the front lines. On November 11, 1918, an armistice was signed between the Allies and Germany, and the fighting stopped. Slater's company remained in France until April 1919, when they were able to sail back to America. From New York, Slater and other returning soldiers traveled by rail to California. On May 9, 1919, they received a heroes' welcome in San Francisco. Slater's military service ended May 23, 1919.
After Slater returned from the war, he raised sheep, hogs, and feed in Woodland, California, where he and his friend Robert (Bob) Lockhart managed a section of the Conaway Ranch. Still an outstanding athlete, Slater played and coached for the Woodland, Yolo Post No. 77, American Legion's football and basketball teams. Slater led Woodland's American Legion football team to the Northern California Championship in 1927.
Due to the soaring popularity of American football, rugby had virtually disappeared from the United States except in California. In 1920 when the Olympic Games Committee allowed the formation of a United States Olympic Rugby Team, it was no surprise that every team member was a Californian. Slater was one of the first players chosen for the team. The 1920 Olympic Games were held in Antwerp, Belgium. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team was the only team that dared to challenge the powerful French team, and the French eventually condescended to play the inexperienced Americans. On September 5, 1920, the Americans won gold medals by unexpectedly beating the French, 8-0.
In 1924, the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team was again made up of Californians. Babe Slater was chosen as team captain. His brother Norman was also on the team. At the 1924 Paris Olympic Games, only three teams entered the rugby competition: France, Romania, and the United States. Although the Americans had been well received in London, where they had played three exhibition games against English rugby teams, the French public was hostile toward the U.S. team. The French rugby team, regarded as the most skilled in the world, easily beat the Romanians, 61-3 on May 4, 1924. On May 11th, the United States defeated Romania 37-0. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team was mainly made up of basketball and American football players who did not have much experience playing rugby, yet their size, fitness, and athletic ability made them formidable opponents. On May 18, 1924, the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team won gold medals by defeating France 17-3 at Colombes Stadium. Angry French fans rioted in the stands, assaulted American supporters, and jeered the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team during the medal ceremony. After the American victory, the French government apologized for the behavior of the French fans. Due in part to the fans' violence, rugby was not included in future Olympic games.
Circa 1927, Babe Slater moved from Woodland to Clarksburg, California and bought rich farming land located in the Holland Land Company subdivision. Slater farmed there for close to thirty years raising crops including: alfalfa, asparagus, barley, beet and carrot seeds, dry beans, peas, safflower, sugar beets, tomatoes, and wheat. Norman Slater left his job as a mechanic for Associated Oil Company in San Francisco and moved his family to Clarksburg so that he could farm with his brother. Babe Slater married Virginia Cave (1909-1991) in 1932, and they had one daughter, Marilyn. In 1955, Marilyn graduated from the University of California, Davis. She married Richard McCapes in August 1955. Soon after his daughter married, Slater retired from farming.
Slater was active in many University of California, Davis organizations including the Cal Aggie Alumni Association, Friends of the Davis Campus, the UC Davis Alumni Agricultural Advisory Committee, the UC Davis Alumni Scholarship Foundation, and the secret society Sword and Sandals. He and Mrs. Slater were often honored guests for Picnic Day at UC Davis. Slater was a Picnic Day parade judge in 1956. In 1956 and 1957, he arranged for reunions of the classes of 1916 and 1917 to be held on the UC Davis campus during Picnic Day.
Also active in the local community, Slater was a member of the Woodland, Yolo Post No. 77, American Legion and the Woodland Elks Lodge, No. 1299. He was elected president of the Yolo County Farm Bureau in 1951 and 1952, and, over the years, he and Mrs. Slater went on many Farm Bureau trips including travel to Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Japan, and Mexico.
Colby E. Babe Slater died on January 30, 1965. Later that year, the Calpha agricultural fraternity established the Colby E. "Babe" Slater Memorial Athletic Award at the University of California, Davis. This annual award and the "Babe" Slater Perpetual Athletic Trophy went each spring to the Davis student selected as Athlete of the Year. In addition, Slater was posthumously inducted into the Woodland Athletic Hall of Fame (1973) and the Cal Aggies Athletic Hall of Fame (1980) at the University of California, Davis.
A list of sources consulted and a detailed chronology follow this biography.
Sources:
Blum, John M., William S. McFeely, Edmund S. Morgan, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., Kenneth M. Stampp, and C. Vann Woodward. The National Experience: A History of the United States. San Diego, Calif.: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1985.
Collegiate Underdogs Claim Gold Medal. Accessed on-line on March 23, 2004 at http://www.rugbyallamericans.org/history.html
Coppo, Richard. "The History of Rugby in the Olympic Games." Rugby Magazine, Feb.-March 2004. Accessed on-line on March 17, 2004 at http://rugbymag.com/archive/2004/march/march.htm
Hickey, Dan, comp. In the Beginning. Accessed on-line on March 17, 2004 at http://www.pacificcoastrugby.com/template.php?sid=10#top
Jenkins, Mark. "An American Victory in Paris." Historical Rugby Articles. Accessed on-line on March 19, 2004 at http://wesclark.com/rrr/history.html
Larkey, Joann Leach. Cooperating Farmers: A 75-Year History of the Yolo County Farm Bureau. [Woodland, Calif.]: Yolo County Farm Bureau, 1989.
Memorial Book, Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis. Entry for Robert R. Lockhart (1893-1963). Accessed on-line on Feb. 4, 2004 at http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/memorial/lockhart.htm
"Rugby at the 1924 Olympics." Historical Rugby Articles. Accessed on-line on March 17, 2004 at http://wesclark.com/rrr/history.html
Scheuring, Ann F. Abundant Harvest: The History of the University of California, Davis. [Davis, Calif.]: UC Davis History Project, 2001.
Walters, Shipley. Clarksburg: Delta Community. Woodland, Calif.: Yolo County Historical Society, 1988.

Chronology

Colby E. "Babe" Slater Chronology (also includes important dates from sports history; University of California, Davis history; and World War I).
1873-1882 University of California students at Berkeley played informal disorganized "football" games against each other and local high school teams.
1882 Rugby enthusiasts from the San Francisco Bay Area converted the University of California to the game of rugby.
1883-1885 The University of California continued to play Bay Area rugby clubs, improved greatly, and was soon defeating most teams.
1886 The University of California's first head football coach, O. S. Howard, brought the game of American gridiron football from the East Coast to the Berkeley campus. American football immediately became popular in California.
1889 July 9. Brother, J. Herbert Slater was born to Louise and John Slater.
1891 Feb. 7. Sister, Marguerite Slater was born to Louise and John Slater.
1894 Jan. 23. Brother, Norman B. Slater was born in San Francisco to Louise and John Slater.
1896 April 30. Colby E. "Babe" Slater was born in Berkeley to Louise and John Slater.
  The first modern Olympic Games were held in Athens, Greece.
1900 Rugby was on the program for the second Olympic Games in Paris. Great Britain, France, and Germany sent rugby teams. The French won the gold medal.
1906 Due to the brutal nature of American football, its burgeoning professionalism, and fighting between University of California and Stanford University fans, as well as President Theodore Roosevelt's censure of the game, high schools, colleges, and universities in California dropped American football in favor of rugby.
  The University Farm, a branch of the University of California's College of Agriculture, was established in Davis, California.
Circa 1906-1914 Bay Area fans became more and more interested in rugby. As many as 26,000 flocked to big games between the University of California and Stanford University.
1908 Jan. 8. Father, John Slater died.
1909 Virginia Cave (later Mrs. Colby E. "Babe" Slater) was born in Clarksburg, California.
  January. Formal instruction began at the University Farm School in Davis. The University Farm offered a three-year course in the principles and practices of agriculture.
1910-1914 The earliest University Farm School teams played rugby but called it football.
1911, 1912 Babe Slater led the Berkeley High School rugby team to Bay County League championships, the Northern California title, and the State title. Brother, Norman B. Slater played half back on the team.
1914 January. Three female students (the first at the University Farm School) arrived from Berkeley to spend a few months on the Farm. One of them was Babe Slater's sister, Marguerite Slater.
  June 28. Sarajevo. In an act that led to the First World War, Gavrilo Princip assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
  July-August. Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, Russia, and Belgium. Germany declared war on Russia, and after Germany demanded from Belgium free passage for German troops, Germany declared war on France. Great Britain declared war on Germany after Germany invaded neutral Belgium.
  August-September. British forces crossed to France in an attempt to halt the German advance. French and British troops pushed the Germans back at the first battle of the Marne. Then the French marched north to beat the Germans in a race to control vital ports in the British Channel. The enemies established stable battle positions, creating the "Western Front," a solid line of opposing trenches that stretched from the Channel to near Nancy, France.
1914-1917 Babe Slater enrolled at the University Farm School at Davis. He starred in rugby, football, basketball, and baseball. He served as Basketball Team Captain, Junior Class President, House Manager for the Calpha Fraternity, Thanksgiving Day Special Chairman, Picnic Day Parade Chairman, and Picnic Day General Chairman.
1915 February. Germany proclaimed a war zone around the British Isles.
  May 7. Lusitania,a British luxury passenger liner traveling from the United States was sunk off the coast of Ireland by a German submarine. Almost 1,200 civilians were killed, including 128 Americans.
  Autumn. California's high schools, colleges, and universities started playing American football again. Rugby's popularity began to die out in America.
  Autumn. The University Farm School stopped playing rugby in favor of American football. Slater was one of only eighteen men from a student body of 296 who reported for the University Farm's first American football team.
1916 February-December. The Germans launched an offensive against the French at Verdun. Losses on both sides were heavy--about a million men. No strategic advantages were gained by either side.
  April. The United States threatened to sever diplomatic ties unless Germany changed its method of submarine warfare.
  July-November. The British conducted an offensive along the Somme River at the Western Front, but suffered their heaviest losses without making substantial gains.
1917 January. Germany announced that their submarines would sink all ships belligerent or neutral. The United States broke off relations with Germany.
  March 18. German submarines sank three American ships.
  April 6. The United States declared war on Germany.
  May. The United States House and Senate passed a selective service bill in order to recruit a large army and spread the obligation to serve among all qualified men age twenty-one to thirty.
  May 18. After completing a prescribed three-year course in agriculture, Slater graduated from the University Farm School.
  Early June. Over nine million American men including Slater registered for the draft.
  July-November. Enduring extremely rainy and muddy conditions, British forces conducted an offensive against German lines near Ypres, Belgium. There were heavy casualties. Finally, Canadian troops captured the village of Passchendaele.
  Sept. 23. Slater joined the United States Army. He served with the Medical Corps in France during the First World War.
  October-November. The Eastern Front had collapsed along with the Russian Army. After the October Revolution, the Bolsheviks took power in Russia and began to negotiate with Germany for peace. This allowed Germany to concentrate on the Western Front.
  Nov. 1. Slater was promoted to Corporal.
1918 Spring. German forces launched a major offensive on the Western Front. Allied lines manned by war-weary French and British troops crumbled.
  Circa May. A crowd assembled in Woodland, California at the Southern Pacific depot to see off the Yolo County "Liberty Boys." Slater led the group of forty-two boys, who entrained for Camp Lewis, American Lake, Washington to begin intensive training for war.
  May-June. Germans pushed the French back to the Marne River, close to Paris. American troops stopped the Germans at Chateau Thierry.
  June 27. American soldiers, including Slater, left Camp Lewis by train. Along the route to New York, townspeople cheered the troops and gave them candy and cigarettes.
  July 3-11. Slater was based at a camp in New York, and he visited New York City before being sent to war.
  July 12. Slater's company sailed from New York on the S.S. Olympic.The enlisted men endured poor conditions aboard the ship.
  July 19-20. Slater's company arrived at Southampton, England.
  July 21-25. Slater's company was at a rest camp in Cherbourg, France.
  July-August. Germans struck at a sector of the Marne between Rheims and Soissons. Americans helped to turn the attack and participated in the French counteroffensive that cleared out the sector.
  July 26-Aug. 24. Slater's company was based at St. Nazaire, France. General Pershing inspected the camp.
  Aug. 28-Sept. 6. Slater's company was based at Nogent, France.
  September-October. Meuse-Argonne offensive. The Allies pushed through German lines. Costly, but crucial American victories near St. Mihiel, Verdun, and Sedan as well as French and British successes routed the Germans and all but defeated their army. The Germans were driven out of France, and the Allies advanced into Belgium.
  Sept. 26-Oct. 4. Slater's company moved through Avocourt, Very, and Epionville, evacuating wounded soldiers to hospitals. They spent six terrible days under heavy shellfire and attack from enemy airplanes before they could leave Epionville.
  Oct. 13-17. Slater's company was at Revigny, France.
  Oct. 19-25. Slater's company was at Boesinghe and Ypres, Belgium. Slater noted that Ypres was "shot up pretty badly."
  Oct. 25. Slater's company spent the day hiking from Ypres to Roulers. Slater noted that they passed by, "nothing but devastated country--worse than the imagination could ever stretch it--for miles and miles all that could be seen was torn-up ground that resembled a choppy sea with great tanglements of barbed wire and railroad tracks."
  Oct. 25-30. Slater's company was at Roulers, Belgium.
  Oct. 30-Nov. 5. Slater's company hiked from Roulers to the Waregem area and to the front lines. They tended to the wounded and set up dressing stations. The Germans were shelling and bombing Belgium from the air.
  Nov. 3. Slater and Jim Gregory volunteered to go to Oudenaarde to find out the status of the dressing station, which was in the City Hall. The Germans were shelling, and their airplanes were firing on troops. The bridge across the Schelde River to the German line was only about 300 yards from the City Hall.
  Nov. 5-9. Slater's company was at Roosebeke, Belgium.
  Nov. 9. The Kaiser abdicated.
  Nov. 11. In the Forest of Compiegne, an armistice between the Allied forces and Germany was signed and fighting stopped.
  Nov. 10-26. Slater's company was in Oudenaarde, where they put up a dressing station, but no patients came because hostilities had ceased. There was considerable celebration in the city over the declaration of an armistice.
  Nov. 26-Dec. 7. Slater's company was at Izegem, Belgium.
  December. Slater's company was based at Proven, Belgium. They took day trips around the country and often were the first to pass through devastated areas. When a group of them went to no-man's-land to gather wood, they saw: bodies of men and horses, trenches, graves, barbed wire, shells, machinery, downed airplanes, and churned up ground. They took souvenirs off of a German airplane.
  Dec. 19. Slater received a Christmas box.
  Dec. 24-25. Slater and other soldiers took the early train to Brussels. They got a room, had a good meal, and celebrated Christmas. Crowds cheered the Americans.
1919 Jan. 4-March 23. Slater's company was based at Ceton, France. When they left, the whole population of Ceton came to see them off.
  Jan. 27. General Pershing reviewed American troops including Slater's company at Belleme, France.
  March 24-April 7. Slater's company was near St. Nazaire at Camp Guthrie, an embarkation camp. The men underwent physical exams before sailing for America.
  April 8-20. American soldiers including Slater were at sea on the U.S.S. Virginian. The immaculate ship was newly refitted to transport troops.
  April 20-May 2. American soldiers including Slater returned to the United States. They docked at New York, got off a ferry at Long Island Terminal, and boarded trains for Camp Upton. Crowds cheered them wherever they went.
  April 22-23. Slater was on leave in New York City.
  May 2-9. Slater and other soldiers departed Camp Upton by train. After crossing the United States, they arrived in Oakland, California early in the morning, took a boat to San Francisco, were in a parade down Market Street to City Hall, and then took streetcars to the Presidio.
  May 23. Slater's military service ended.
  June 28. The Allied Powers and Germany signed the Treaty of Versailles and officially ended the "war to end all wars."
  Returning veterans organized Yolo Post No. 77, American Legion, in Woodland, California.
Circa 1919-1926 Slater settled in Woodland. Slater and Robert (Bob) Lockhart managed a 9,000 acre section of the Conaway Ranch, where they raised sheep, hogs, and feed.
1920s Slater played and coached for the football and basketball teams of the Woodland, Yolo Post No. 77, American Legion.
1920 Due to the popularity of American football, rugby had almost disappeared from the United States except for California. The Olympic Games Committee granted Californians permission to form the United States Olympic Rugby Team for the upcoming Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium.
  Slater was one of the first players chosen for the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team. The team was mainly made up of students from California universities as well as recently graduated club players. Dan Carroll, an Australian gold medalist of the 1908 games and naturalized U.S. citizen, was both player and coach for the team.
  April-September. The Seventh Olympic Games were held in Antwerp, Belgium. The U.S. and France entered the rugby competition. As European champions, the French believed themselves to be far superior to the inexperienced U.S. team and only reluctantly consented to play the Americans.
  June 30. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team sailed from New York on an overcrowded Army transport ship, the Sherman,arriving in Antwerp, Belgium thirteen days later.
  July-September. In Antwerp, the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team was housed in a converted school. Meals were served at their quarters, and buses transported the athletes to and from practice and competition.
  Sept. 5. The rugby match between France and the U.S. was played at Antwerp Stadium. Unexpectedly, the United States beat France 8-0. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team won the gold medal. Slater became the first University of California, Davis alumnus to win an Olympic gold medal.
  Sept. 19-Oct. 10. The loss to the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team stunned the French government. They asked the American team to tour France and play French all-star teams. The Americans won three out of the four matches they played.
1923 September. The U. S. Olympic Committee agreed to send a rugby team to the 1924 Olympic Games in Paris despite the fact that rugby had not been played competitively in the United States for almost a decade. The Committee did not provide travel funds, so players had to use their own money to get to Paris.
1924 Babe Slater was chosen as Captain of the United States Olympic Rugby Team.
  Brother, Norman Slater was chosen as a member of the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team. He was thirty, married, had two children, and worked in San Francisco.
  Linn Farish of Woodland, California had played on the Stanford Rugby Team and was also chosen as a member of the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team.
  March. The Woodland Democrat organized "The Babe Slater Friendship Fund" as a testimonial of friendship and token of the community's appreciation of the modest all-around sportsman. The Friendship Fund allowed a maximum donation of fifty cents. Slater was so popular that 510 people (including 130 grammar school boys) contributed to the fund, which was used to buy Slater a gold watch and chain, an elk's tooth charm, and a gold card and receipt case.
  Circa March. Woodland's Yolo Post No. 77, American Legion presented Slater with a suitcase engraved with his initials and a receipt, which acknowledged that his dues were paid in full for one year.
  Circa April 2. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team climbed aboard the Overland Limited.They were accompanied by Charles Austin as coach and Sam Goodman, President of the Pacific Athletic Association, as manager. The twenty-three member team included seven members who were veterans of the 1920 Olympic Games.
  April 7. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team sailed from New York on the America.
  Circa April 20. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team landed at Plymouth, England. The team played three exhibition games in London against British rugby clubs in order to "get in shape" before the Paris Olympic Games.
  April. In England, the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team was joined by Allen C. Valentine. Valentine, a Rhodes Scholar and All-American, was the only member of the team who was not from California.
  Circa April 27. The British Olympic Association gave a dinner for the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team at the Piccadilly Hotel in London.
  Circa April 28. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team arrived in Paris. The team was made up of superb athletes including California football and basketball All-Americans. Many had never played rugby, but Coach Austin relied on his team's size, speed, stamina, and raw athletic ability to compensate for its technical deficiencies.
  Circa April-May. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team was the target of French hostility. After immigration officials mistakenly refused the team entry into France and the American players forced their way off ship and onto dry land, the French press labeled the team, "street fighters and saloon brawlers." When American rugby team members ventured outside their Paris hotel, they were insulted and even spat upon by the French.
  Circa May. Cash and other possessions were stolen from the U.S. Olympic Team's dressing room while they were at practice.
  May. Three teams entered the Olympic rugby competition in Paris: France, the United States, and Romania.
  May 4. France won their rugby match against Romania, 61-3.
  May 11. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team defeated Romania 37-0. The French crowd booed every American score, but both the American and French press noted the lack of violence and skilled nature of American play, along with the Americans' size and fitness.
  May 18. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team won the gold medal by defeating France 17-3 at Colombes Stadium, which was filled with 50,000 spectators. The French rugby team was expected to easily beat the inexperienced American team. During the game, the French were devastated by American football-style tackling. The hits were within the rules of the game. The humiliating defeat of the French team angered their fans, who rioted in the stands and assaulted American supporters. The French fans threw bottles and rocks at the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team and tried to break through the tall wire fence that surrounded the playing field. Tens of thousand of hostile onlookers jeered the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team during the medal ceremony, the raising of the American flag, and the playing of the Star Spangled Banner. After the ceremony, the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team was rescued from the rioting crowd by dozens of gendarmes. Due in part to the bad behavior of the French crowd and the lack of international participation in Olympic rugby matches, rugby was not included in future Olympic games. The French government later apologized for the behavior of the French fans, and soon after, the French press began to portray the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team as heroes.
  May 18. A banquet was given by the French Rugby Federation at Palais D'Orsay in honor of the Olympic Rugby Games. The U.S. Olympic Rugby Team attended this official banquet. The Prince of Wales was also a guest.
  May 19. American Friends of the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team, including Senator James D. Phelan, gave a banquet in honor of the team's Olympic victory. The banquet was held at the Inter-Allied Club of Paris. Many prominent Californians attended. Senator Phelan presented the team with medals and a statue that symbolized victory.
  May 21. Coach Austin and eight players left Paris for Cherbourg on the first leg of their journey home. They sailed for New York on the steamship, George Washington.The rest of the U.S. Olympic Rugby Team went their separate ways.
  Circa June 4. After traveling to Belgium and Switzerland, the Slater brothers, departed from Cherbourg and sailed for New York on the S.S. Leviathan.
  Circa June 15. The Slater brothers returned to the San Francisco Bay Area.
  Circa June. Mr. and Mrs. Robert (Bob) Lockhart held an open house in honor of Babe Slater upon his return to Woodland, California from the Paris Olympic Games.
  Circa June. Slater resumed farming in Woodland.
1924-1925 Dec. 25-Jan. 1. Rugby matches were held at Brockton Point, Vancouver, British Columbia. The California All-Stars (mainly made up of U.S. Olympic Rugby Team members, and including Babe Slater) beat the University of British Columbia 9-0, the "Reps" beat California 3-0, and California beat the Mainland All-Stars 15-0 in the final and deciding contest of the three game series.
1927 Dec. 4. Woodland's American Legion football team won the California State Championship. Woodland beat Merced 6-0 to win the Championship game, which was held at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco. Slater both played for and coached the Woodland team.
Circa 1927 Slater moved to Clarksburg, California. At Gus Olson's urging, he bought 100 acres of rich farming land located in the Holland Land Company subdivision at Clarksburg.
Circa 1927-1955 On his Clarksburg farm, Slater raised crops including: alfalfa, asparagus, barley, beet and carrot seed, dry beans, peas, safflower, sugar beets, tomatoes, and wheat.
1928 October. Norman Slater moved to Clarksburg in order to farm with his brother. Norman had been a mechanic for the Associated Oil Company in San Francisco.
Circa 1930s-1960s Slater was active in University of California, Davis groups including the Cal Aggie Alumni Association, Friends of the Davis Campus, the UC Davis Alumni Agricultural Advisory Committee, the UC Davis Alumni Scholarship Foundation, and Sword in Sandals.
1930-1931 May 5. The Clarksburg Community Church Council approved the building of scout cabins in Clarksburg. A committee was formed with Slater as Chairman of Construction, and the community worked together to build the cabins.
1932 Slater married Virginia Cave at the Clarksburg Community Church.
1932-1933 Slater was one of a group of Clarksburg farmers who leased a cannery in order to can and sell their asparagus crops.
1933 Daughter, Marilyn was born. She was the Slaters' only child.
Circa 1946 A committee of Clarksburg residents (including Babe and Norman Slater) with the help of the Yolo County Extension Service initiated the establishment of a fire district for Clarksburg.
1947 Norman Slater was elected fire chief and served until retirement in 1962. Babe Slater served as a commissioner of the Clarksburg Fire Department.
  April 19. Babe Slater, Robert G. Sproul, Claude P. Hutchison, Judge Peter J. Shields, Robert (Bob) Lockhart, J. E. Coke, G. H. Hecke, and Stanley Freeborn were among the honored guests at Picnic Day on the UC Davis campus.
Circa 1948 Mother, Louise, died.
1951 Circa January. Slater was elected President of the Yolo County Farm Bureau. Over the years, he and Mrs. Slater went on many Farm Bureau trips including travel to Australia, Belgium, Germany, Japan, and Mexico.
  April 14. Slater and California Governor Earl Warren were among the honored guests at Picnic Day on the University of California, Davis campus.
1952 January. Slater was reelected as Yolo County Farm Bureau President, and the Bureau held its 37th annual meeting in Woodland. More than 600 persons attended the business meeting and accompanying bean feed, awards presentations, and entertainment.
  December. Thirty-five Yolo County Farm Bureau members including Mr. and Mrs. Babe Slater boarded a special train at Davis, California, joining 175 northern Californians and 255 southern Californians on their way to a ten-day American Farm Bureau Federation convention in Seattle, Washington. The group also toured Victoria, British Columbia.
1955 Circa May. Daughter, Marilyn graduated from the University of California, Davis. She had been a yell leader (1955), a member of the Alpha Omega sorority (1955), a member of the Cal Club (1954, 1955), Director of Reception for Picnic Day (1954), Junior Class Secretary (1954), a member of the Rally Committee (1953, 1955), Picnic Day Secretary (1953), and a homecoming princess (1952, 1953, 1955).
  August. Daughter, Marilyn married Richard McCapes in Sacramento.
  Slater retired from farming.
Circa 1955 After retirement, Mr. and Mrs. Babe Slater bought a vacation home at Dillon Beach near Bodega Bay, California.
1956 April 21. Slater judged the Picnic Day Parade at the University of California, Davis.
1956, 1957 Active in the Cal Aggie Alumni Association, Slater arranged reunions for the classes of 1916 and 1917 to be held on the University of California, Davis campus during Picnic Day. The classes of 1914 and 1915 were also invited.
1957, 1958 April. Mr. and Mrs. Slater were among the honored guests at Picnic day on the University of California, Davis campus.
1961 April. Slater, Robert (Bob) Lockhart, and other "old-timers" rode in the University of California, Davis Picnic Day Parade. They would attend a reunion of the Class of 1916.
1965 Jan. 30. Colby E. Babe Slater died.
  The Calpha agricultural fraternity established the Colby E. "Babe" Slater Memorial Athletic Award at the University of California, Davis. This annual award went each spring to the Davis student selected as Athlete of the Year. Associated with the award was the "Babe" Slater Perpetual Athletic Trophy.
Circa 1970 Brother, Norman Slater, a longtime Clarksburg resident, moved to Sacramento.
1973 June 14. Babe Slater was posthumously inducted into the Woodland Athletic Hall of Fame. His wife, Virginia, accepted the award at the first annual awards dinner in Woodland.
1980 Oct. 10. Babe Slater was posthumously inducted into the newly formed Cal Aggies Athletic Hall of Fame at the University of California, Davis. His wife, Virginia, accepted the award at the first annual induction banquet. Chancellor James H. Meyer presented each hall-of-famer with a plaque commemorating his induction.
1991 Nov. 15. Mrs. Slater (Virginia Cave Slater) died.
2003 December. Marilyn Slater McCapes and Richard H. McCapes donated the Colby E. "Babe" Slater Collection to Special Collections at the General Library of the University of California, Davis.
2004 February. Marilyn Slater McCapes and Richard H. McCapes presented Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of California, Davis with Babe Slater's two Olympic gold medals.

Scope and Content of Collection

The Colby E. "Babe" Slater Collection spans the years 1906 to 2001, but the bulk of the collection is made up of materials dating from 1917 to 1957. The collection is arranged in seven series: 1. Diaries, 2. Correspondence, 3. Publications, 4. Ephemera, 5. Photographic Material, 6. Scrapbook, and 7. Realia. Most of the Slater Collection focuses on Slater and the United States Olympic Rugby Team winning gold medals at the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium and the 1924 Olympic Games in Paris. The collection also contains material pertaining to subjects such as the University of California, Davis (formerly the University Farm); World War I; farming; travel; Yolo County, California; the Berkeley (Calif.) High School Rugby Team; and Woodland, California's American Legion football team. Highlights of the Slater Collection include photographs of Picnic Day 1916 at the University Farm; Slater's diary kept while he served in the United States Army during the First World War; correspondence related to a forty-year reunion of the University of California, Davis' Class of 1917; a list of those who contributed to the "Babe" Slater Friendship Fund; scrapbook items such as clippings, photographs, and other memorabilia from the Olympic games; Slater's two Olympic diplomas; and some of his medals. Slater's two Olympic gold medals are housed at Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of California, Davis.

Indexing Terms

The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the Library's online public access catalog.

Subjects

Slater, Colby E.
University of California, Davis--History
University of California, Davis--Students
Cal Aggie Alumni Association--History
Agriculture--California--Yolo County.
Football
Olympic Games (7th : 1920 : Antwerp, Belgium)
Olympic Games (8th : 1924 : Paris)
Ranching--California--Yolo County.
Rugby football
Sports--History--20th century
World War, 1914-1918
Yolo County (Calif.)--History


Collection Contents

 

Series 1.  Diaries, 1919-1922.

Physical Description: 2 volumes

Scope and Content Note

In the first diary, Slater recorded events of his service in the United States Army on the Western Front during the First World War. In the 1922 diary, Slater kept brief records of his work managing a farm on the Conaway Ranch in Woodland, California.
Box 1:1

World War I, diary, June 1918-May 1919.

Physical Description: 1 volume

Note

Box 1:2

Conaway Ranch, Woodland (Calif.), diary, 1922.

Physical Description: 1 volume

Note

 

Series 2.  Correspondence, 1924-1973.

Physical Description: 19 folders

Scope and Content Note

Arranged chronologically. The 1924 letters relate to the Paris Olympic Games. The 1948 letter has to do with Slater's choice of farming as his life's work. The 1956 and 1957 letters and class rosters pertain to Slater's efforts to organize Picnic Day class reunions for the University of California, Davis' classes of 1914, 1915, 1916, and 1917. The 1973 letter has to do with Slater's posthumous induction into the Woodland (Calif.) Athletic Hall of Fame.
Box 1:3

Bower, E. to Dagg, E., April 2, 1924.

Box 1:4

? to Slater, Colby E. Babe, May 19, [1924].

Box 1:5

Slater, Colby E. Babe to Lockhart, Marilyn, May 4, 1948.

Note

photocopy.
Box 1:6

Coke, Sterling D. to [Voorhies, Edwin C.], April 2, 1956.

Box 1:7

Duffy, W. J., Jr., to Slater, Colby E. Babe, April 11, 1956.

Box 1:8

Spafford, F. E. to Slater, Colby E. Babe and Blossom, Bob, Jan. 17, 1957.

Box 1:9

Ed? to Slater, Colby E. Babe, March 2, 1957.

Box 1:10

Slater, Colby E. Babe and Blossom, Bob to Cal-Aggie Alumni, Class of 1917, March 13, 1957.

Note

form letter.
Box 1:11

Wood, Leonard C. to Slater, Colby E. Babe, March 19, 1957.

Box 1:12

Duffy, W. J., Jr., to Slater, Colby E. Babe, March 23, 1957.

Note

letter and enclosed report.
Box 1:13

Ho, Dean to Slater, Colby E. Babe, March 29, 1957.

Box 1:14

Seares, Fritz to Slater, Colby E. Babe, April 3, 1957.

Box 1:15

Bath, George H. to Slater, Colby E. Babe, April 8, 1957.

Box 1:16

? to Slater, Colby E. Babe, April 9, 1957.

Box 1:17

Ed? to Slater, Colby E. Babe, April 21, 1957.

Box 1:18

Class of 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, roster, compiledcirca 1957.

Box 1:19

Class of 1917, roster, compiledcirca 1957.

Box 1:20

Aggie Alumni, Sacramento, Yolo, and Solano Counties, roster compiledcirca 1957.

Box 1:21

Klenhard, Dick to Slater, Virginia, June 6, 1973.

 

Series 3.  Publications, 1912-2001.

Physical Description: 23 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged by subject in the following subseries: University of California, Davis; World War I; Seventh Olympic Games; Eighth Olympic Games; Travel; Yolo County (Calif.); and Other. Contains serials, clippings, maps, and travel guides.
 

Subseries 3.1.  University of California, Davis, 1917-1965.

Physical Description: 5 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged chronologically. Contains clippings and serials.
Folio Box 6:1

Clippings, Picnic Day, 1917.

Folio Box 6:1

University Farm Agricola. May 4, 1917.

Box 1:22

Calpha Bear. 1939, 1941, 1942, 1948, 1950.

Box 1:23

Clippings, Picnic Day, 1957.

Folio Box 6:2

Clippings, Colby E. "Babe" Slater Memorial Athletic Award, 1965

Folio Box 6:3

Instant Replay: Football Program of the University of California, Davis. Nov. 11, 1972; Dec. 1972.

Folio Box 6:3

Clipping, Cal Aggies Athletic Hall of Fame, 1980.

Folio Box 6:3

Subseries 3.2.  World War I, circa 1918.

Physical Description: 1 folder.

Scope and Content Note

Contains clippings.
 

Subseries 3.3.  Seventh Olympic Games, Antwerp (Belgium). 1920-1966.

Physical Description: 5 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged chronologically. Contains clippings and serials some of which are written in French or Dutch.
Folio Box 6:3

Ons Land in Woord en Beeld. Brussels, Aug. 29, 1920.

Note

Dutch.
Folio Box 6:5

Le Miroir des Sports. Paris, Sept. 2, 1920; Sept. 30, 1920; Oct. 14, 1920.

Note

French.
Folio Box 6:6

Sporting: Journal Sportif Illustre. Paris, Sept. 21, 1920, Oct. 12, 1920.

Note

French.
Folio Box 6:6

Le Sportif. Paris, Oct. 9, 1920.

Note

French.
Folio Box 6:7

Clippings, United States Olympic Rugby Team on tour of France, 1920.

Box 1:24

Report of the American Olympic Committee: Seventh Olympic Games, Antwerp, Belgium, 1920. Greenwich, Conn.: The Conde Nast Press, 1921.

Box 1:25

Rugby USA, Vol. 1, No. 4, Nov. 1966.

Note

photocopy.
 

Subseries 3.4.  Eighth Olympic Games, Paris, 1924-2001.

Physical Description: 2 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Contains clippings. See also the Scrapbook series for additional clippings.
Folio Box 6:8

Clipping, "Friendship Fund," March 11, 1924.

Folio Box 6:8

Clippings, United States Olympic Rugby Team, Paris Olympic Games, 1924-2001,

Folio Box 6:9

Clippings, United States Olympic Rugby Team on tour of British Columbia, Dec. 1924-Jan. 1925.

 

Subseries 3.5.  Travel, 1913, n.d.

Physical Description: 6 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Contains guides and other items related to travel in Belgium, France, Germany, and Switzerland.
Box 1:26

Wiesbaden Official Guide: Information Respecting Baths and Treatment. Wiesbaden (Germany): Municipal Enquiry Office, 1913.

Physical Description: 1 vol.
Box 1:27

Berner Oberland. Zurich: Wehrli A. G., n.d.

Physical Description: 1 vol.
Box 1:28

Handy Guide to Brussels and its Environs. Brussels: n.d.

Physical Description: 1 vol.
Map Case IV: Drawer S

Nouvelle Carte de France. Paris: A. Taride, n.d.

Physical Description: 1 map.
Box 1:29

Relief Panorama of the Rhine. Cologne (Germany): Hoursch & Bechstedt, n.d.

Physical Description: 1 map.
Box 1:30

Souvenir from Brussels: 24 Photos with Explanations in French and in English, n.d.

Physical Description: 1 vol.
 

Subseries 3.6.  Yolo County (Calif.), 1923-1973.

Physical Description: 3 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged chronologically. Contains clippings.
Folio Box 6:10

Clippings, American Legion, Woodland (Calif.), football team, 1923, 1927.

Folio Box 6:11

Clipping, Clarksburg (Calif.), [1924].

Folio Box 6:11

Clippings, Yolo County Farm Bureau (Calif.), 1952.

Folio Box 6:12

Clippings, Woodland (Calif.) Athletic Hall of Fame, 1973.

Folio Box 6:13

Subseries 3.7.  Other Subjects, 1912-1925.

Physical Description: 1 folder.

Scope and Content Note

Contains clippings that relate to various rugby teams including Berkeley (Calif.) High School and the New Zealand All Blacks.
 

Series 4.  Ephemera, 1917-1980.

Physical Description: 30 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged by subject in the following subseries: University of California, Davis; World War I; Seventh Olympic Games; Eighth Olympic Games; Travel; and Yolo County (Calif.). Contains cards, certificates, diplomas, fliers, lists, a menu, postcards, a poster, a print, programs, a receipt, stickers, and tickets.
 

Subseries 4.1.  University of California, Davis, 1917-1980.

Physical Description: 4 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged chronologically.
Box 2:1-2

Flyer and program, Picnic Day, April 28, 1917.

Box 2:3

Diploma, May 18, 1917.

Box 2:4

Program, Cal Aggies Athletic Hall of Fame, Oct. 10, 1980.

 

Subseries 4.2.  Word War I, 1917-1919.

Physical Description: 3 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged chronologically.
Box 2:5

Certificate, registration, June 5, 1917.

Folio Box 7:1

Certificate, appointment to rank of corporal, United States Army, Nov. 1, 1917.

Box 2:6

Certificate, Armed Forces service, Nov. 11, 1919.

Folio Box 7:1

Certificate of gratitude, circa 1919.

 

Subseries 4.3.  Seventh Olympic Games, Antwerp (Belgium), 1920.

Physical Description: 9 folders, 1 framed diploma.

Scope and Content Note

Includes cards, a certificate, an Olympic diploma, postcards, a print, stickers, programs, a poster, and tickets.
Box 2:7

Cards, 1920.

Box 2:8

Certificate, United States Olympic Rugby Team, 1920.

Room 141

Olympic Diploma, 1920.

Box 2:9-10

Postcards, 1920.

Box 2:11

Print, United States Olympic Rugby Team, 1920.

Box 2:12

Stickers, 1920.

Box 2:13

Programs, July-Sept. 1920.

Map Case IV: Drawer S

Poster, Sept. 1920.

Box 2:14

Tickets, Sept.-Oct. 1920.

 

Subseries 4.4.  Eighth Olympic Games, Paris, 1924-1925.

Physical Description: 3 folders, 1 framed diploma.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged chronologically. See also the Scrapbook series for additional ephemera.
Folio Box 7:2

Lists, "Friendship Fund," March 1924.

Room 141

Olympic diploma, 1924.

Box 2:15

Menu, May 19, 1924.

Box 2:16

Flyer, United States Olympic Rugby Team on tour of British Columbia, Jan. 1, [1925].

 

Subseries 4.5.  Travel, n.d.

Physical Description: 8 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Contains ephemera related to travel in the following countries: Belgium, England, France, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Monaco, and Switzerland.
Box 2:17-23

Postcards, n.d.

Box 2:24

Stickers, various hotels, n.d.

 

Subseries 4.6.  Yolo County (Calif.), 1924-1973.

Physical Description: 3 folders.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged chronologically.
Box 2:25

Certificate, March 20, 1924.

Box 2:26

Receipt; membership dues for Woodland (Calif.); Lodge No. 1299; B.P.O. Elks; March 31, 1930.

Box 2:27

Program, Woodland (Calif.) Athletic Hall of Fame, June 14, 1974.

 

Series 5.  Photographic Materials, 1906-1961.

Physical Description: 153 prints and 45 negatives.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged in two subseries: Photographic Prints and Negatives.
 

Subseries 5.1.  Photographic Prints, 1906-1961.

Physical Description: 153 prints.

Scope and Content Note

Arranged by subject. Contains many photographs of Babe Slater. The Berkeley (Calif.) High School Rugby Team prints include a group portrait and three action shots. Most of the University of California, Davis prints are of Picnic Day 1916. The World War I prints are snapshots of soldiers. The Seventh Olympic Games prints are formal shots of the United States Olympic Rugby Team and images from a rugby match between the Americans and the French Sud-Ouest Team at Bordeaux. Prints from the Eighth Olympic Games range from formal shots of the United States Olympic Rugby Team to snapshots of team members aboard ship. See also the Scrapbook series for more prints from the Eighth Olympic Games. Images of Slater, family, and friends from childhood through the later years make up the Family and Friends prints. Unidentified prints are snapshots of bridges, buildings, cattle, sporting events, and ships.
Box 2:28-30, Folio Box 7:3

Berkeley (Calif.) High School Rugby Team, 1911-1912.

Physical Description: 4 prints.
Box 2:31-55

University of California, Davis, 1915-1961.

Physical Description: 28 prints.
Box 2:56-74

World War I, circa 1918.

Physical Description: 28 prints.
Box 2:75-84

Seventh Olympic Games, Antwerp, Belgium, 1920.

Physical Description: 11 prints
Box 3:1-16, Folio Box 7:4

Eighth Olympic Games, Paris, 1924-1925.

Physical Description: 22 prints.
Box 3:17-36

Family and Friends, 1906-1961.

Physical Description: 27 prints.
Box 3:37-51

Unidentified, 1924, n.d.

Physical Description: 33 prints.
Box 3:52-4:2

Subseries 5.2.  Negatives, 1924, n.d.

Physical Description: 45 images.

Scope and Content Note

Some negatives correspond to prints in this collection. Most of the negatives are unidentified. They appear to have been made in the early twentieth century and include images of people, automobiles, buildings, livestock, and other subjects.
 

Series 6.  Scrapbook, 1924.

Physical Description: 46 folders.

Scope and Content Note

This scrapbook was compiled by Babe Slater's mother, Louise. It contains newspaper clippings, photographs, and ephemera related to Slater winning an Olympic gold medal as captain of the United States Olympic Rugby Team during the 1924 Paris Olympic Games. When the collection was processed, items were removed from the scrapbook and placed in acid-free folders. The scrapbook pages were scanned before they were disassembled in order to keep a record of the original positions of items on the pages. Preservation photocopies of newspaper clippings were also made.
Box 4:3-4

Reproductions of scrapbook pages and newspaper clippings.

Physical Description: 2 folders.
Box 4:5-15, Folio Box 7:5

Newspaper clippings, 1924.

Physical Description: 12 folders.
Box 4:16-18, Folio Box 7:6

Ephemera, 1924.

Physical Description: 4 folders.
Box 4:19-45, Folio Box 7:7

Photographs, 1924.

Physical Description: 28 folders.
Box 8

Scrapbook covers, 1924.

Physical Description:
 

Series 7.  Realia, 1912-1962.

Physical Description: 33 items.

Scope and Content Note

The majority of these items are medals and charms that Slater earned by winning athletic competitions including rugby at the Olympic Games.
Folio Box 8

Chain and charms, 1912-1928.

Physical Description: 1 chain, 8 charms.

Note

Folio Box 8

Medal, "VII Olympiad, Anvers," 1920.

Physical Description: 2-1/4 inch diameter.

Note

Folio Box 8

Medal, Pacific Association Championship, American Legion Basketball Team, 1922.

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Elk's tooth charm, Woodland (Calif.) Lodge no.1299, [1924].

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Card/receipt case, [1924].

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Medal, "Olympic Games, Paris 1924, Colby E. Slater, Captain,"

Physical Description: 2-3/4 x 1-1/2 inches.

Note

Folio Box 8

Medal with ribbon, "Officiel, C. O. F., VIII Olympiade, Paris 1924."

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Medal, "Concurrent, C. O. F., VIII Olympiade, Paris, 1924."

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Medal, "VIII Olympiade, Paris, 1924."

Physical Description: 2-1/8 inch diameter.

Note

Folio Box 8

Medal with ribbon, "On behalf of the City of New York to the victorious American athletes on their return from the Olympic Games," 1924.

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Medal, "Aeros Sport," n.d.

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Charm, Cal Aggie Alumni Association, University of California, Davis, n.d.

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Name tag, Yolo County Farm Bureau, circa 1952.

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Pennant with Olympic Rings, circa 1924.

Physical Description:

Note

Folio Box 8

Frame, n.d.

Physical Description:

Note

Box 5:1

Metal plates from German aircraft, circa 1918.

Physical Description: 2 items.

Note

Box 5:2

Ribbon, "California," n.d.

Physical Description:

Note

Box 5:3-5

Packaging, 1962, n.d.

Physical Description: 7 items.

Note