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Register of the Ivan D. London papers
83060  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Access
  • Publication Rights
  • Preferred Citation
  • Acquisition Information
  • Accruals
  • Related Collection(s)
  • Biographical Note
  • Scope and Content of Collection

  • Title: Ivan D. London papers
    Date (inclusive): 1934-2005
    Collection Number: 83060
    Contributing Institution: Hoover Institution Archives
    Language of Material: English, Russian, and Chinese
    Physical Description: 95 manuscript boxes, 2 card file boxes, 1 oversize box (42.2 linear feet)
    Abstract: Correspondence, writings, questionnaires, interview transcripts, notes, reports, memoranda, and printed matter relating to social conditions in the Soviet Union and China, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, the psychology of the Soviet people and émigrés from the Soviet Union, anti-communist Western propaganda, and the study of science, especially psychology, in the Soviet Union. Includes the papers of Miriam London, wife and collaborator of Ivan D. London.
    Physical Location: Hoover Institution Archives
    Creator: London, Ivan D., 1913-1983.
    Contributor: London, Miriam.

    Access

    Boxes 91-98 closed. Eligible to be opened August 5, 2023. The remainder of the collection is open for research.
    The Hoover Institution Archives only allows access to copies of audiovisual items. To listen to sound recordings or to view videos or films during your visit, please contact the Archives at least two working days before your arrival. We will then advise you of the accessibility of the material you wish to see or hear. Please note that not all audiovisual material is immediately accessible.

    Publication Rights

    For copyright status, please contact the Hoover Institution Archives.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Ivan D. London papers, [Box no.], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Acquisition Information

    Acquired by the Hoover Institution Archives in 1983.

    Accruals

    Materials may have been added to the collection since this finding aid was prepared. To determine if this has occurred, find the collection in Stanford University's online catalog at http://searchworks.stanford.edu/ . Materials have been added to the collection if the number of boxes listed in the online catalog is larger than the number of boxes listed in this finding aid.

    Related Collection(s)

    Harvard University Russian Research Center interview transcripts, Hoover Institution Archives
    Alex Inkeles papers, Hoover Institution Archives
    The Harvard Project on the Soviet Social System Online, Harvard College Library

    Biographical Note

    Dr. Ivan London was an American psychologist. He began his career as a mathematician and then switched to psychology, attracted by the fresh methodological approach of applying mathematics to science.
    London joined the Harvard Russian Research Center in 1950 to participate in the Harvard Project on the Soviet Social System (Harvard Emigre Interview Project). Subsequently he joined the faculty at Brooklyn College. There, he and his wife, Miriam, developed their own academic research group that became the Institute of Political Psychology of Brooklyn College, where they carried out further research on Russian refugees, interviewing hundreds of refugees. London also taught social psychology and wrote extensively on the validity of refugee interviewing methods. During the 1960s he continued to interview refugees and published many articles on the subject. He was a leading expert on Soviet psychology with wide contacts with many Soviet psychologists.
    In 1963, London decided to apply his interviewing method to Chinese refugees. He spent considerable time in Taiwan and Hong Kong, interviewing refugees and publishing the results. His work with Chinese refugees continued until his death in 1983.

    Scope and Content of Collection

    The papers document the career of Ivan London, professor of psychology at Brooklyn College. The papers include correspondence, writings, questionnaires, interview transcripts, notes, reports, memoranda, and printed matter relating to social conditions in the Soviet Union and China; the Chinese Cultural Revolution; the mindset of the Soviet people and émigrés from the Soviet Union; anti-communist Western propaganda; and the study of science, especially psychology, in the Soviet Union.
    The Inwood Project on Intercultural Communication (European Group of Harvard University) Records series makes up the main body of the collection. The series is divided into three parts by interview type: A-Schedule (Problem of Communication between Peoples), B-Schedule (Special Topics Interviews), and D-Schedule (Soviet Psychological Research). The series consists of interview transcripts, completed questionnaires, reports, and working interview notes, and also includes Chinese refugees project documents consisting of responses to questionnaires and correspondence.
    The Correspondence series mainly contains London's letters to and from refugees and researchers associated with the Harvard Project on the Soviet Social System. The Writings series contains materials written, translated, and edited by London. These represent a variety of topics in sociology and psychology, including religion, education, and science in the Soviet Union, as well as a contemporary analysis of history and psychology.
    The collection also includes the papers of Miriam London, wife and collaborator of Ivan D. London, including her correspondence and writings.

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Propaganda, Anti-communist.
    Psychology--Soviet Union.
    Psychology--China.
    Public opinion--Soviet Union.
    Public opinion--China.
    Soviet Union--Emigration and immigration.
    China--Emigration and immigration.
    Science--Soviet Union.
    China--History--Cultural Revolution, 1966-1976.
    China--Social conditions.
    Soviet Union--Social conditions.