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Finding Aid of the Amy C. Ransome collection on Women's Suffrage 0001
0001  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Biographical note
  • Acquisition
  • Scope and Content
  • Conditions Governing Access
  • Conditions Governing Use
  • Preferred Citation
  • Related Archival Materials

  • Title: Amy C. Ransome collection on Women's Suffrage
    Collection number: 0001
    Contributing Institution: USC Libraries Special Collections
    Language of Material: English
    Physical Description: 3.38 Linear feet 7 boxes
    Date (inclusive): 1884-1949
    Abstract: The Amy C. Ransome collection contains material related to women's suffrage from 1884-1949. There is a large amount of correspondence and printed material connected with Sarah Ware Whitney, editor of the Women's Standard in Waterloo, Iowa. In addition, there is correspondence and organizational material from the Iowa Equal Suffrage Association and other state organizations; equal rights and temperance pamphlets, ca. 1890-1900; World Woman's Party correspondence and clippings, ca. 1940; and National Suffrage Bulletins, 1897-1901.
    creator: Ransome, Amy Cordoba Rock, 1872-1942

    Biographical note

    Amy Cordoba Rock Ransome (1872-1942) was a well-known suffragist and leader in the National Woman's Party who spent much of her life promoting equal rights for women. Ransome was born in Cordoba, Argentina (the inspiration for her middle name) where her father, Miles Rock, was working at the newly-established Argentine National Observatory. She spent most of her childhood in Washington, D.C. where her parents were well established members of that city's scientific community. They encouraged their two children, ACR (as she was known to family and friends) and her brother Alfred Mayer Rock, to pursue educational opportunities and political activism. ACR attended Bryn Mawr (BA '93), the University of Heidelberg (Chemistry MA '96), and the University of Berlin ('96-7, Ph.D. studies in Chemistry cut short by international friction with Germany over the Spanish-American War). When Ransome returned to Washington, she left her chemistry career behind and shifted her studies to geology. While working as an assistant at the USGS in D.C., she met her future husband, Frederick Leslie Ransome (FLR to family and friends), whom she married in 1899. FLR was a well-known American geologist who helped found the journal Economic Geology in 1905 and was associate editor of the Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences. Together, they had four children, Janet, Susan, Violet, and Alfred. Both before and after her marriage, Ransome was actively involved in politics and lobbying for progressive women's causes. When she married, she left civil service to raise her family, but she continued her political activities.
    In the 1920s and 1930s, as FLR's teaching career took them to Princeton, Tucson and Pasadena, the Ransomes kept their Washington residence. The house in D.C. allowed FLR to continue working as a consultant for the USGS and to participate in the national scientific community. It also gave Ransome a base from which she could further her political work. Ransome maintained the house in Washington after FLR died in 1935 and regularly traveled between California and D.C. to continue her lobbying activities.
    When FLR accepted a position at Cal Tech, ACR turned her considerable political skills and expertise to work at the grassroots level in her new place of residence, Pasadena. Since she already had extensive experience and a network of friends who were active on the national level, such as Alice Paul, the relocation to Pasadena made Ransome an obvious candidate for the position of Western Regional Chairman for the National Woman's Party. She also served as Treasurer for the World Woman's Party and Chairman for the American Association of University Women.
    One of the highlights of Ransome's career occurred in 1937 when Alice Paul, the Head of the National Woman's Party, asked her to attend the 37th annual assembly of the League of Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. This assembly was of historical significance because it was the first time in history where women from around the world met to discuss women's suffrage on a worldwide level and propose various amendments to address the inequalities that existed. One amendment provided for universal suffrage, another stated that there shall be no distinction based on sex in law and practice regarding nationality, a third guaranteed equal rights to men and women in all fields, and a fourth provided that men and women shall both be members with full voting powers of all delegations to the Council and Assembly of the League and to all conferences under auspices of the League. In addition to the amendments, the league appointed a committee to make an extensive study on the status of women throughout the world. The report of the committee's findings would be returned within a two year period, and Ransome was responsible for lobbying within Latin America.
    Amy Ransome died suddenly on August 13, 1942.
    [Much of this information is courtesy of Ransome's great-grandson, David H. Grace.]

    Acquisition

    The Amy C. Ransome Collection was donated to USC by Una R. Winter, former Director of the Susan B. Anthony Memorial Committee. The collection was given to USC in 1948-1949. Other relevant collections were added to this one including the personal papers of Harriet Howe and the biographies of Elizabeth and William Kent.

    Scope and Content

    The Amy C. Ransome collection on Women's Suffrage includes correspondence, clippings, bulletins, photographs, and articles related to women's suffrage from 1884-1949. There is a large amount of correspondence and printed material connected with Sarah Ware Whitney, editor of the Women's Standard in Waterloo, Iowa. In addition, there is correspondence and organizational material from the Iowa Equal Suffrage Association and other state organizations; equal rights and temperance pamphlets, ca. 1890-1900; World Woman's Party correspondence and clippings, ca. 1940; and National Suffrage Bulletins, 1897-1901.

    Conditions Governing Access

    COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE. Advance notice required for access. Consult finding aid for additional information.

    Conditions Governing Use

    The collection contains published articles; researchers are reminded of the copyright restrictions imposed by publishers on reusing their articles and parts of books. It is the responsibility of researchers to acquire permission from publishers when reusing such materials. The copyright to unpublished materials belongs to the heirs of the writers. Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository and the copyright holder.

    Preferred Citation

    [Box/folder# or item name], Amy C. Ransome collection on Women's Suffrage, Collection no. 0001, Regional History Collections, Special Collections, USC Libraries, University of Southern California.

    Related Archival Materials

    Alice Paul Papers, 1785-1985, Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America Radcliffe College, MC 399.

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Anthony, Susan B., (Susan Brownell), 1820-1906 -- Archives
    Callanan, Martha C. -- Archives
    Catt, Carrie Chapman, 1859-1947 -- Archives
    Iowa Equal Suffrage Association. -- Archives
    National Woman's Party. -- Archives
    Paul, Alice, 1885-1977 -- Archives
    Ransome, Amy Cordoba Rock, 1872-1942 -- Archives
    Whitney, Sarah Ware -- Correspondence
    World Woman's Party. -- Archives
    Clippings
    Correspondence
    Feminists--United States--Archival resources
    Manuscripts
    Pamphlets
    Suffragists--United State--Biography--Archival resources
    Women political activists--California--Los Angeles--Archival resources
    Women--Suffrage--United States--Archival resources
    Women--United States--History--19th century-_Archival resources
    Women--United States--History--20th century--Archival resources