Jump to Content

Collection Guide
Collection Title:
Collection Number:
Get Items:
Overview of the Arnold Joseph Toynbee miscellaneous papers
25006  
No online items No online items
View entire collection guide What's This?
PDF (79.54 Kb) HTML
Search this collection
 
 
Table of contents What's This?

Partial Collection Contents

Record cabinet

Sound recordings (phonorecords) 1950

Record cabinet

Sound recording of Toynbee speech made in Memorial Auditorium, Stanford University, Stanford, California 1950 October 19

Access Information

Use copy reference number: 25006_a_0001705

Scope and Content Note

Toynbee states his ancestors would say history makes sense because one can see the will of God in history. However, other events challenge this Christian assumption. The study of natural law has produced a philosophy of this law existing on its own, not as handed down from God. Cycles play an important role in life. Wars occur in a cycle, business goes through booms and busts, and the generational cycle is important to changes of nationalities. (3 discs)
Record cabinet

Sound recording of Toynbee speech made in Memorial Auditorium, Stanford University, Stanford, California 1950 October 20

Access Information

Use copy reference number: 25006_a_0001706

Scope and Content Note

On how the West sees itself as a cohesive body; it's not "we" Americans, "we" Briton, or "we" Germans, but "we" Westerners. Toynbee on the path toward a world government, formalizing this new identity. He sees the Christian tradition as a tying bond. He also compares the world to the Roman Empire. (2 discs)
Record cabinet

Sound recording of Toynbee speech to the Commonwealth Club: Is Our Civilization on the Way Out? 1950 October 20

Access Information

Use copy reference number: 25006_a_0002896

Scope and Content Note

Toynbee speaks about the changes Western society needs to make in order to stay relevant and resist communism. He believes the West needs to be both (a) more than national-minded and (b) more religious minded. He believes countries should submit its sovereignty to a world power, no matter how terrible, if it can prevent another world war. He relates Islam to communism and how both are rooted in Western civilization and a continuation of institutions gone wrong. He concludes by pondering the rights of the individual vs. society, saying the Western stance is a paradox as the communist view is more noble and selfless. (2 discs)
 

Rest of collection not yet described