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California Agricultural Teaching Aid Photograph Collection
D-528  
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Collection Contents

 

Series 1. The Dairy Farmer in the Community circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 29 mounted photographs

Scope and Content Note

Captions from the back of each photograph have been used in the descriptions. Arranged in number order.
Box 1:1

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0001 These boys and girls are drinking milk with their school lunch. Let's visit a dairy farm and see how we get our milk. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:22

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0002 This is Mr. Hopkins. His business is running a dairy farm. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:3

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0003 Here is where Mr. Hopkins and his family live. They have the Dairy of Merit Plaque in front of their house. This Plaque was awarded to them by the California Dairy Industries Association. It shows that Mr. Hopkins and his family are proud of their home and dairy because they have met the Association's high standards for neat and attractive appearing buildings and grounds. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:4

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0004 Mr. Hopkins buys some of his cows. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:5

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0005 And he raises some from calves. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:6

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0006 When water is available for summer irrigation, dairymen find permanent pastures an economical source of green feed for their herds. This pasture is being irrigated by sprinklers called 'birds.' One or more men are kept busy moving the sprinkler pipes from place to place during the dry season. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:7

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0007 This is the way Mr. Hopkins irrigates his pastures. These sprinklers are called "birds." It keeps one more men busy moving the sprinkler pipes from place to place during the dry season. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:8

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0008 Besides having pastures for grazing, Mr. Hopkins releases other green feed called "succulents." These men are unloading succulents into a trench silo. The succulents will partially ferment to form "silage," a good winter feed for cows. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:9

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0009 On his farm Mr. Hopkins, also, raises most of his own hay. He has many modern machines to help make his work easier. This is a hay loader. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:10

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0010 Another machine which helps Mr. Hopkins is the tractor. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:11

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0011 This hay loader is one of many modern mechanical devices which help make the dairy farmer's work easier. Dairymen who have enough land may grow all or part of the hay needed for their herds. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:12

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0012 Some dairy farmers do not have enough water or land for pastures or growing their own feed. These farmers have "dry lot" dairies where the cows are kept in corrals and all their feed is bought. These cows eat silage in the winter and fresh green feed in the summer. The silage is kept in the silo in the background. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:13

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0013 A well balanced month's feed ration for an average cow is shown here. Some dairymen vary the amount according to each cow's milk production. Excepting the alfalfa hay and the block salt, the various feeds are usually mixed and fed as 'concentrates.' The local feed dealer also supplies the concentrates ready mixed, either in bulk or in sacks. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:14

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0014 Every morning this farmer has to buy fresh green feed called "salad." His big truck, with its automatic unloader, is filling the feeding racks with "salad." circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:15

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0015 The twice daily milking routine of the dairy farm begins when the cows are brought from pasture or corral to the 'holding pen' adjoining the milking barn. This well trained dog helps the herdsman to keep the cows from loitering along the way. Notice the sprinklers irrigating the distant pasture. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:16

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0016 Of course, all dairy farmers must have plenty of water for their cows to drink. A cow will drink 12 or more gallons of water a day. These are Jersey cows. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:17

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0017 These cows are going from the 'holding pen' into the milking barn. Most modern milking barns in California are small, with room for 4 to 8 cows at one time. After each cow is milked, she leaves by a different door, and another cow is let in. Modern milking barns must meet high standards of construction and equipment if they are to be approved for use in producing Grade A milk. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:18

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0018 Mr. Hopkins sees to it that his cows have a good balanced diet. This shows the food that one of his cows will eat in a month. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:19

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0019 Here come the cows to be milked. They come in twice a day from the pasture or corral to the "holding pen" next to the milking barn. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:20

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0020 Up they go into the milking barn. They stand in line and take their turns. Then out they come. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:21

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0021 In Mr. Hopkins' modern dairy, the milking is done by machines. Milking can be done faster with machines than by hand. With machines two men can milk 100 cows in about 2 hours. This man is fitting a milking machine onto the cow's udder. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:22

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0022 This is what the machine looks like up close. It is run by electricity. The milk goes up into an overhead pipeline of stainless steel or glass. The pipeline carries the milk to the milkroom, where it is cooled and collected in a "holding tank." circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:23

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0023 Can you see the milk from the pipeline running over the cooler? The milk is cooled to 40 degrees F before it goes into the holding tank which is like a big thermos bottle and keeps the milk cold until it is shipped to the dairy plant. The dairy worker is checking the temperature in the holding tank. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:24

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0024 This tester for the Dairy Herd Improvement Association visits the dairy farm once a month. He weighs each cow's milk and tests a sample for quality. From his records, the dairyman can tell how well each cow is producing. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:25

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0025 Clean up after milking often takes longer than the actual milking process. The milking machines, pipelines, cooler and holding tank must be thoroughly "sanitized" in order to protect the milk supply. State and local inspectors check all dairy buildings and equipment regularly. Sometimes, Mrs. Hopkins and the children help with the clean up. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:26

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0026 After milking each morning and evening the barn and holding pen must be washed. Here a farm worker in rubber boots is hosing the cement floor of the holding pen. The shelter shed in the background protects the dairy herd against bad weather. In California, because of the mild climate, no other protection is needed. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:27

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0027 A refrigerated tank truck from a dairy plant in the city picks up milk at the farm. The driver checks the temperature of the milk in the holding tank. He also takes a sample to be tested in the dairy plants' laboratory. Then a sterile hose is connected to the holding tank (picture 19) and the milk is pumped into the truck's tank. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:28

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0028 In the laboratory at the dairy plant, samples of all the milk brought in from the dairy farms each day are tested in by specially trained people. They test for quality, milk fat and milk solids content. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:29

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0029 Some products and services used on the dairy farm and some important products of the dairy farm. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
 

Series 2. Delta Mendota Canal, Fish Diversion Facility circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 26 mounted prints

Scope and Content Note

Captions from the back of each photograph have been used in the descriptions. Arranged in number order.
Box 1:30

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0030 The Central Valley Project is a federally financed and operated project designed to alleviate the growing water shortage in the Central Valley of California by releasing water stored in the northern part of the state during the winter and spring months to the central and southern areas of California for use in irrigation of summer crops. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:31

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0031 This is an aerial view of the Tracy Pumping Plant area which is the beginning of the Delta Mendota Canal. The upper right hand corner of the photograph shows the beginning of the inlet canal. Water is diverted from the Old River into the inlet canal which follows into the Tracy Pumping Plant. When water enters the pumping plant it is pumped up-hill for approximately one mile. This process lifts the water 200 feet so that it can start its gravity drain down the canal. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:32

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0032 This is a large relief map of the Central Valley Project showing natural waterways which are pictured in light blue, and man-made waterways which are in dark blue. High voltage transmission lines indicated in red come from Trinity, Shasta, and Folsom Powerhouses into the switchyard at the Tracy Pumping Plant. Each of these lines operates at 230KV (230,000 volts). The Bureau of Reclamation offers tours of the pumping plant to visitors interested in gaining a better understanding of the Central Valley Project. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:33

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0033 This is a rear view of the floating trash deflector shown at the mouth of the inlet canal where the water is diverted from the Old River into the canal. The river is to the left and the canal is to the right. In the right background can be seen the fish screen plant where the fish are screened and counted so they do not enter the canal. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:34

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0034 This is a trash rake located at the beginning of the intake canal. It is used to remove trash from the canal and to keep the canal operation clean. The rake lowers 25 feet from the road level to the bottom of the canal and moves horizontally 100 feet in its operation. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:35

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0035 This is the opposite view of the trash rake showing the control man and the waiting dump truck. The trash will be collected and dumped by the trash rake. Note the rails upon which the rake structure is able to move horizontally across the intake canal. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:36

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0036 This is the floating deflector for trash across the intake canal. The view is from the Old River. Note the safety protection signs and speed limit of fast water. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:37

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0037 This is a view from the floating trash deflector showing the collecting point of trash and the conveyor for loading the trash. Note the safety construction of the deck for workmen and safety signs indicating fast current. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:38

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0038 This is a close-up of the conveyor used in clearing the collecting point. Note the "A" frame at the right of the picture with cable and tongs used to load large logs or trees on the conveyor. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:39

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0039 This is the conveyor dumping the trash on to the waiting truck. Trash is usually composed of tules, islands of peat moss, old trees, planks, bottles, cans, dead fish, and water hyacinths. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:40

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0040 This is the four ton gantry crane located above the "primary louver" which separates fish from the canal. Note three pick-up points on intake baffles along the primary louver and one at the far end. These take fish and a little bit of water through 36 inch pipelines to secondary louver in background. The secondary louver further condenses fish into a smaller amount of water proportionate to cubic foot of water per fish. The efficiency of this louver system is quite high, however some fish do get through by evading these pick-up points or by coming upstream from the other end of the canal. The four ton gantry crane is used to lift the louver sections for cleaning depending on the amount of algae collected. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:41

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0041 These are holding tanks. After the fish are collected from the secondary louver they are held until they are counted and transported downstream from the intake system. They are then released into the river which will eventually take the fish to the ocean. This photo shows two of the four holding tanks. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:42

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0042 Fish and water enter the holding tank through the pipe shown in the lower left hand corner. The tank is designed so that water will flow to the center through the screen. After the fish are collected, they are held outside the circular screened tank until "bucket" is lowered and the fish are again collected for transportation downstream. Note the air diffuser stones which are aerating stones in the bottom of the tank on the floor. Compressed air is pumped into the tank through these stones for adding oxygen to the water. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:43

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0043 This is a fish counting bucket about to be lowered into the holding tank for collecting and counting. After the fish are allowed to collect in the holding tank for 10 minutes a count is made. This figure is multiplied by 12 to determine the number of fish collected over a two hour period, at which time another count is made. This is a continuous twenty-four hour a day count on every odd hour. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 1:44

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0044 This is a fish counting bucket inside the screened tank. After the majority of water is drained out of the holding tank, the fish counting bucket is lowered into place. The circular screen is raised allowing the remaining water and fish to be collected in the bucket. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:1

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0045 The bucket is removed from the holding tank and fish are then lowered into the specially constructed tank for counting. Extra water collected is drained back into the holding tank and fish are now concentrated into a smaller tank. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:2

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0046 The fish are counted. Undesirable fish, such as carp, are thrown out and do not re-enter the river. This man is making the count by himself. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:3

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0047 During peak hours of collection more than one man is used to count fish. Shown is a team of two counters and one tabulator. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:4

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0048 This is a fish transporting bucket. The fish are being removed in the transporting bucket to be loaded into the fish truck. They will now be released downstream and allowed to continue their journey to the ocean. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:5

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0049 Here the fish are being loaded into the fish truck. The truck is equipped with aeration and cooling equipment to maintain necessary oxygen and temperature of the water. This truck will hold up to 80,000 small fish. Normal loads range from 25,000 to 40,000 fish. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:6

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0050 The fish are released back into the river. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:7

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0051 This is a traveling water screen. The water is screened of smaller particles of trash which have eluded the trash rack. Fish leaving the secondary louver area are transferred to this clean filtered water en route to the holding or storage tanks. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:8

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0052 These are maintenance men inspecting one of the two holding tank pump motors. Most of the maintenance to the fish collecting facilities is done during the winter months when the Tracy Pumping Plant is not in operation. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:9

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0053 This is a painter spraying a louver guide for the secondary louver. Note the construction of the louver where the painter is standing, which shows baffles at 90 degree angle to the water flow. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:10

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0054 These are workmen cleaning one of the secondary louvers of trash which has evaded the trash rack and floated in through the pickup points with the fish. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:11

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0055 These are workmen preparing to launch a small boat used occasionally in the operation of the fish collecting facility. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
 

Series 3. Modern Cattle Ranching in Alameda County circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 21 mounted prints

Scope and Content Note

Captions from the back of each photograph have been used in the descriptions. Arranged in number order.
Box 2:12

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0056 Most of the ranches in Alameda County are in the hills. These ranches are usually several thousand acres in size. The land is called grazing land. Do you know what the word "graze" means? circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:13

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0057 Some of the "ranch hands" who take care of the cattle now ride in jeeps rather than on horses. Notice the road on which jeeps and trucks travel. The cattle have made their own "roads!" Water troughs are located in many places on the ranches in order that the animals can drink. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:14

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0058 Salt is very important for the cattle so these salt-lick-blocks are used. Do you know why the cattle need salt? The Alameda County Farm Advisor says that salt aids the cattle's digestion! circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:15

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0059 Cattle stay out of doors. At feeding time they come from miles around to eat. Here you see the animals walking down toward the truck because the ranch hand has blown the horn. When he calls the cattle he says, "Hi, Bossy!" circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:16

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0060 It is feeding time. The ranch hand is giving the cattle some cull carrots which have come from a near by produce processing house. This is a very economical food. Do you know what "cull" carrots are? circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:17

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0061 A ranch hand has to be a "Jack-of-all-trades." Among the many duties performed by the ranch hand are (1) feeding the cattle, (2) repairing the tractor, and (3) using a form to make a new water trough. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:18

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0062 When the cattle have been sold for slaughter, they are taken in trucks to the "feed lot" which may be many miles away from the cattle ranch. The feed lot is a place where the cattle go to be fattened before being slaughtered. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:19

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0063 The cattle truck driver has quite a task to get the cattle out of the truck into the feed lot. Usually the animals have to be prodded to leave the truck. They are counted by the feed-lot superintendent as they emerge from the truck. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:20

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0064 About ten percent of the cattle arrive at the feed lot in cattle cars by rail. The balance are shipped by truck. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:21

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0065 After the cattle are unloaded they are weighed in groups of ten to twenty for purposes of ascertaining weight gained during the 120 day period the cattle are at the feed lot. Note the scales which are in the shed at the end of the corral. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:22

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0066 In order to prevent the possibility of error, a special scale is used to "weigh in" the cattle. The weight is stamped on a card which accompanies the animal. This weight is compared with a later weight to show how many pounds were gained during the stay at the feed lot. Here the man is punching on the card the weight of the cattle. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:23

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0067 After the cattle are weighed, they are guided through a chute to be branded and inoculated. From there the animals go through a cleaning bath to eliminate any skin diseases. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:24

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0068 The cattle are inoculated to prevent their becoming diseased while at the feed lot. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:25

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0069 For the purpose of keeping a record, each steer is branded. This new brand acts as a "bill of sale" for the feed lot and the cattle owner. The brand is recorded at the State Capitol. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:26

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0070 Gigantic mixers are used to blend the proper diet for the cattle. The animals at first are fed as minimum diet which is gradually increased during their stay at the feed lot. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:27

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0071 The animals remain at the lot for approximately one hundred and twenty days. During this time they are checked periodically to see how the diet agrees with them. If the diet doesn't agree with one, he is separated from the others and placed in a corral to be fed a special diet. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:28

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0072 From the feed lot the cattle are shipped to slaughter houses in specially designed two-decker trucks. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:29

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0073 Here the cattle are leaving the lower level of the specially designed two-decker truck. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:30

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0074 Following the slaughter, the beef is inspected several times by State inspectors. These men inspect the vital organs to determine if the animal was healthy. If any disease is evident, the meat cannot be used for human consumption. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:31

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0075 This is the final inspection of the meat for purposes of sanitation. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print
Box 2:32

UCD.PIC.D528.2010.0076 After passing all inspections the Government stamp is placed on the meat. circa 1950-1959

Physical Description: 1 mounted print