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Register of the Mother Ariadna Papers
2001C12  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Access
  • Publication Rights
  • Preferred Citation
  • Acquisition Information
  • Location of Originals
  • Scope and Content Note
  • Biographical note

  • Title: Mother Ariadna papers,
    Date (inclusive): 1935-1984
    Collection Number: 2001C12
    Contributing Institution: Hoover Institution Archives
    Language of Material: Russian
    Physical Description: 1 microfilm reel (0.15 linear feet)
    Abstract: History, letters, and printed matter, relating to the Russian Orthodox convent Bogoroditse-Vladimirskaia zhenskaia obitel' in China and relocated in California.
    Physical Location: Hoover Institution Archives
    Creator: Ariadna, Mother

    Access

    Collection is open for research.

    Publication Rights

    For copyright status, please contact the Hoover Institution Archives.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Mother Ariadna Papers, [Box no.], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Acquisition Information

    Acquired.

    Location of Originals

    Originals in: Museum of Russian Culture, San Francisco.

    Scope and Content Note

    This collection consists of materials relating to the history of the Bogoroditse-Vladimirskaia zhenskaia obitel' (convent) in Harbin and Shanghai, China, and San Francisco, California. There are also biographical materials relating to Abess Rufina, Ariadna's predecessor, who founded the convent in Harbin in 1924 and led it through its first 13 years (Rufina died in Shanghai in 1937). The convent remained in the care of Abess Ariadna through the Second World War, evacuation from China and reestablishment in San Francisco in 1948.
    Detailed processing and preservation microfilming for these materials were made possible by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and by matching funds from the Hoover Institution and Museum of Russian Culture. The grant also provides depositing a microfilm copy in the Hoover Institution Archives. The original materials remain in the Museum of Russian Culture, San Francisco as its property. A transfer table indicating corresponding box and reel numbers is available at the Hoover Institution Archives
    The Hoover Institution assumes all responsibility for notifying users that they must comply with the copyright law of the United States (Title 17 United States Code) and Hoover Rules for the Use and Reproduction of Archival Materials.

    Biographical note

    Mother Ariadna was the Abbess of the convent Bogoroditse-Vladimirskaia zhenskaia obitel'. She entered monastic life in 1917 as a novice of the Ioanno-Bogoslovskii Convent in the town of Cherdyn', Perm' guberniia. She was taken in by the abbess of that convent, Rufina, with whom she would spend the next twenty years. Together they fled the Bolsheviks to Vladivostok in 1919, where Rufina was appointed abbess of the Smolensk Odigitriia Convent, and then again to Harbin, where Rufina established the Bogoroditse-Vladimirskaia zhenskaia obitel' in 1924. Mother Ariadna
    Ariadna was fully tonsured in 1931, becoming Rufina's deputy, and taking over as abbess upon Rufina's passing in 1937. She presided over the most difficult years of the convent's existence: its evacuation to Shanghai in 1937-38, then to the Tubabao refugee camp in the Philippines, and finally to San Francisco, California, in 1948. This process was the more difficult because of the important role the convent played in the religious and social life of the Russian community, particularly caring for poor and orphaned children and infants. Coming to America before the bulk of refugees, Ariadna was effective in relieving immigration problems and helped many of the Russians to establish themselves in the United States.
    The Bogoroditse-Vladimirskaia zhenskaia obitel' thus became one of the first Russian Orthodox convents in the United States, and continues to exist to this day. The collection includes materials on its history, and primarily on the life and activities of Abbess Rufina.

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Bogoroditse-Vladimirskaia zhenskaia obitel'.
    Russkaia pravoslavnaia tserkov'.
    China.
    Russia.
    Russians--China.
    Russians--United States.
    United States.