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Guide to the Oscar Buneman Papers
SC0450  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Overview
  • Administrative Information
  • Biographical/Historical Sketch
  • Description of the Collection
  • Access Terms

  • Overview

    Call Number: SC0450
    Creator: Buneman, Oscar, 1913-
    Title: Oscar Buneman papers
    Dates: 1913-1989
    Bulk Dates: 1941-1989
    Physical Description: 17 Linear feet
    Summary: Research notes, papers, reprints, correspondence, lectures, and class materials from his teaching career and research while at Stanford University, with some materials from the 1940s and 1950s relevant to his work on magnetrons. Subjects include plasma physics, fourier transformations, Cray computers, and poisson solvers. Papers also include films of computer simulations, tetrahedron models, and one file of personal documents.
    Language(s): The materials are in English.
    Repository: Dept. of Special Collections & University Archives.
    Stanford University Libraries.
    557 Escondido Mall
    Stanford, CA 94305-6064
    Email: speccollref@stanford.edu
    Phone: (650) 725-1022
    URL: http://library.stanford.edu/spc

    Administrative Information

    Provenance

    Gift of Ruth Buneman, 1993.

    Information about Access

    This collection is open for research.

    Ownership & Copyright

    All requests to reproduce, publish, quote from, or otherwise use collection materials must be submitted in writing to the Head of Special Collections and University Archives, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, California 94304-6064. Consent is given on behalf of Special Collections as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission from the copyright owner. Such permission must be obtained from the copyright owner, heir(s) or assigns. See: http://library.stanford.edu/depts/spc/pubserv/permissions.html.
    Restrictions also apply to digital representations of the original materials. Use of digital files is restricted to research and educational purposes.

    Cite As

    Oscar Buneman Papers (SC0450). Department of Special Collections and University Archives, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif.

    Biographical/Historical Sketch

    Oscar Buneman, prominent scientist in the fields of plasma electrodynamics, fundamental electromagetic theory, and numerical anaylsis, was Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University from 1960 until he reached emeritus status in 1984. While at Stanford he worked on laboratory applications of plasma phys ics to cross-field microwave devices , stability analysis, and other phenomena. He also developed, with a series of collaborators, a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation code (TRISTAN) for Cray supercomputers.
    Buneman, born in Italy in 1913 to German parents, was imprisoned by the Nazis for political resistance in 1934. Upon his release in 1935 , he went to Manchester University in England where he received his bachelor's , master's, and doctoral degrees in mathematics. He continued postdoctural work there on the magnetron. In 1944 he was a member of the British mission to the Manhattan project at Berkeley, Calfornia. From 1950 to 1960 he was a member of Peterhouse College, Cambridge.
    Buneman died on January 24, 1993.

    Description of the Collection

    Research notes, papers, reprints, correspondence, lectures, and class materials from his teaching career and research while at Stanford University, with some materials from the 1940s and 1950s relevant to his work on magnetrons. Subjects include plasma physics, fourier transformations, Cray computers, and poisson solvers. Papers also include films of computer simulations, tetrahedron models, and one file of personal documents.

    Access Terms

    Buneman, Oscar, 1913-
    Stanford University. Dept. of Electrical Engineering--Faculty.
    Cray computers.
    Fourier transformations.
    Magnetrons.
    Motion pictures
    Plasma (Ionized gases).
    Poisson's equation.