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A Register of the Vladislav Al'bionovich (Vl.)Maevskii Papers
2009C10  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Access
  • Publication Rights
  • Preferred Citation
  • Acquisition Information
  • Alternative Forms of Material Available
  • Location of Original Materials
  • Chronology
  • Scope and Content of Collection
  • Arrangement
  • Related Material
  • Separated Material
  • Biography

  • Title: Vladislav Al'bionovich (Vl.) Maevskii Papers
    Date (inclusive): 1869-1978
    Collection Number: 2009C10
    Contributing Institution: Hoover Institution Archives
    Language of Material: English
    Physical Description: 41 microfilm reels (6.15 linear feet)
    Abstract: These papers reflect the writings and research interests of Vladislav Al'bionovich Maevskii, church historian and theologian. Among his writings are works relating to late 19th and early 20th century history of the Eastern Orthodox Church, especially relating to Russian Orthodoxy, Mount Athos, and the Orthodox Church in the United States.
    Physical location: Hoover Institution Archives, Stanford University
    Creator: Maevskii, Vladislav Al'bionovich

    Access

    The collection is open for research

    Publication Rights

    For copyright status, please contact the Hoover Institution Archives

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Vladislav Al'bionovich Maevskii Papers, [Box no.], Hoover Institution Archives.

    Acquisition Information

    Acquired by the Hoover Institution Archives in 2008

    Alternative Forms of Material Available

    A portion of the collection is available on Microfilm

    Location of Original Materials

    Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary, Jordanville, New York

    Chronology

    1893 April 4 Born, Kremenchug, Russia
    1913 Author, Putevye nabroski
    1919 Staff Captain, White Army
    1920 Evacuated from Odessa
    1931 Graduated, Theological Faculty, Belgrade University
    19?? Librarian, Patriarchal library, Belgrade
    19?? Secretary to Patriarch Varnava (Rosich), Belgrade
    1932 Author, Serbskii patriarkh Varnava i ego vremia
    1934 Author, Revoliutsioner-monarkhist (Tikhomirov)
    1936 Author, Narodyi patriarkh
    1937 Author, Sviataia gora-Sremskie Karlovtsy
    1940 Author, Neugasimyi svetil'nik
    1941 Author, Lavra Khilendar
    1945 Arrived in the U.S.A.
    194?-19?? Professor, Saint Tikhon's Orthodox Theological Seminary, South Canaan, PA
    1950 Author, Afonskie razskazy
    1959 Author, Khristianstvo i sotsializm
    1966 Author, Russkie v Iugoslavii
    1969 Author, Afon i ego sud'ba
    1973 Author, Istoricheskie ocherki
    1975 January 16 Died

    Scope and Content of Collection

    These papers reflect the writings and research interests of Vladislav Al'bionovich Maevskii, church historian and theologian. Among his writings are works relating to late 19th and early 20th century history of the Eastern Orthodox Church, especially relating to Russian Orthodoxy, Mount Athos, and the Orthodox Church in the United States.
    In emigration, Maevskii attended Belgrade University's theological faculty, and served as secretary to Patriarch Varnava (Rosich), and librarian of the Patriarchal library. As a result, Maevskii's scholarly activities included numerous topics relating to the Serbian Orthodox Church.
    After arriving in the United States, Vladislav Maevskii became a member of the faculty of St. Tikhon's Orthodox Theological Seminary in South Canaan, PA. This appointment allowed Maevskii to focus on the history as well as contemporary issues of the Orthodox Church in the United States.
    The correspondence file represents Maevskii's close contact with ecclesiastical figures, academicians, scholars, and representatives of the Russian émigré intelligentsia.
    Maevskii's speeches and writings focus largely on his major research interests, and include drafts, notes, and typescripts of both published and unpublished works. Aside from topics relating to Church history, included are works on Rasputin, Russian and Serbian relations, and general topics relating to Russian history and Orthodox theology.
    The Subject File includes materials on the history of the Russian Orthodox Church and especially on the various jurisdictional conflicts that affected the Church in emigration. Particularly important are documents dealing with conflicts of the Orthodox Church in the United States, reflected in collected correspondence of Church hierarchs of the Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America, the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, conciliar minutes, epistles, and other related documents. Of special significance is Maevskii's research on the Athonite monks and monasteries.
    Detailed processing and preservation microfilming for these materials were made possible by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and by matching funds from the Hoover Institution and the Holy Trinity Seminary. The grant also provides depositing a microfilm copy in the Hoover Institution Archives. The original materials remain in the Holy Trinity Seminary Archives as its property. A transfer table indicating corresponding box and reel numbers is appended to this register. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these materials do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    Arrangement

    The collection is organized into eight series – Biographical file, Diary, Correspondence, Speeches and writings, Subject file, Photographs, Oversize file, Printed matter

    Related Material

    Archbishop Apollinarii (Koshevoi) Papers, Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary
    Archimandrite Amvrosii (Konovalov) Papers, Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary
    Konstantin Nikolaevich Nikolaev Papers, Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary
    Aleksandr Kallinikovich Svitich Papers, Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary
    Nikolai Dmitrievich Talberg Papers, Holy Trinity Orthodox Seminary

    Separated Material

    Most books and monographs have been separated to the library. See library catalog

    Biography

    Born on April 4, 1893, Vladislav Al’bionovich Maevskii began his literary career early, publishing his first work, a travelogue, in 1913, after enlisting as volunteer in the Balkan War of 1912-1913. During the Civil War, he joined the White Army as staff captain in 1919, evacuating to Constantinople from the Crimea in 1920 and then immigrating to Serbia, where he enrolled in the Theology Department of Belgrade University, graduating in 1931. Maevskii was a close friend of Patriarch Varnava (Rusich), serving both as his secretary and as librarian of the patriarchal library. In Serbia, Maevskii, who regularly contributed to Russian émigré periodicals, published several monographs on Russian and Serbian church history, Russian history and Mount Athos, which he visited several times and which occupied an important place in his writings.
    In 1945, Maevskii immigrated to the United States, having been invited to teach at St. Tikhon’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in South Canaan, Pennsylvania. During his time at St. Tikhon’s, Maevskii invited Bishop Nikolaj (Velimirovic), subsequently canonized by the Serbian Orthodox Church, to join the seminary’s faculty. Maevskii taught a wide variety of subjects, both theological and historical, and continued to publish not only books but also articles in the Russian émigré press until his death.
    Vladislav A. Maevskii died on January 16, 1975, in New Yor

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Orthodox Eastern Church--United States.
    Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America.
    Serbian Orthodox Church.
    Arkhiepiskopiia pravoslavnykh russkikh tserkvei v zapadnoi Evrope.
    Athos (Greece)
    Diaries.
    Photographs.
    Russia--History.
    Russians--Foreign countries.
    Russkaia pravoslavnaia tserkov' zagranitsei.
    Russkaia pravoslavnaia tserkov'.
    Soviet Union.
    World War, 1939-1945.