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Finding Aid for the The Joan Moore Papers 1978 - 2004
96  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Descriptive Summary
  • Access
  • Publication Rights
  • Preferred Citation
  • Acquisition Information
  • Biography
  • Indexing Terms

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: The Joan Moore Papers,
    Date (inclusive): 1978 - 2004
    Collection number: 96
    Creator: Joan Moore
    Extent: Approximately 28 linear feet
    Repository: University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA
    Los Angeles, California 90095-1490
    Abstract: This collection of approximately 28 linear feet of papers represents the background research underlying Dr. Joan Moore's groundbreaking books and research studies. Chief among them are her books: Homeboy: Gangs, Drugs and Prison in the Barrios of Los Angeles (Temple University Press, 1979) and Going Down to the Barrio (Temple University Press, 1992) Both of which are widely respected for their insights into Mexican American gangs. Dr. Moore's "Drug Posses, Gangs and the Underclass in Milwaukee" study focuses on the African American community. Methodologically these studies expand the Chicago School's community research approach by incorporating actual gang members into the research team. More importantly, Dr. Moore's findings have provided important theoretical insights into deviance and social problems.
    Physical location: Currently housed at the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Library and Archive, 144 Haines Hall. In the future the collection will be stored off site at the UCLA Southern Regional Library Facility. Please allow 72 Hours notice for the paging of archives.
    Language of Material: Collection materials in English

    Access

    Collection is open for research. To view the collection or any part of it, you must fill out our Archival Research Application. http://www.chicano.ucla.edu/library/archival_research_app.shtml

    Publication Rights

    For students and faculty researchers of UCLA, all others by permission only. Copyright has not been assigned to the Chicano Studies Research Center. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Archivist and/or the Librarian at the Chicano Studies Research Center Library. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], The Joan Moore Papers, 96, Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles.

    Acquisition Information

    This collection was donated by the University of Milwaukee Wisconsin on behalf of Dr. Joan Moore.

    Biography

    Dr. Moore has made a major contribution to the social sciences in the area of crime, drugs and gangs. No scholar is as widely cited as is Dr. Joan Moore in this field. She has numerous articles, book chapters, and books in this area. Her two books Homeboy: Gangs, Drugs and Prison in the Barrios of Los Angeles (Temple University Press, 1979) and Going Down to the Barrio (Temple University Press, 1992) are widely respected for their insights into Mexican American gangs. Homeboys is considered by many a "classic" in this field. More recently, her "Drug Posses, Gangs and the Underclass in Milwaukee" study focuses on the African American community. Methodologically these studies expand the Chicago School's community research approach by incorporating actual gang members into the research team. More importantly, Dr. Moore's findings have provided important theoretical insights into deviance and social problems.

    Indexing Terms

    The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.

    Subjects

    Education
    Ethnography
    Joan Moore
    Mexican Gangs
    Sociology