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Inventory of the William Vere Cruess Papers
D-053  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Biography
  • Scope and Content
  • Related collection
  • Indexing Terms
  • Access
  • Acquisition Information
  • Processing Information
  • Preferred Citation
  • Publication Rights

  • Creator: Cruess, W. V. (William Vere), 1886-1968
    Title: William Vere Cruess Papers,
    Date (inclusive): 1915-1965
    Extent: 13.4 linear feet
    Abstract: William Vere Cruess, a pioneer in food science and technology, spent his entire career as a University of California, Berkeley faculty member. His research was instrumental in the development of many practices in the field of food science including: mechanical fruit dehydration, the use of fruits in the production of fruit juices and fruit beverages, and the use of freezing storage for preservation of fruits and fruit products. Cruess also conducted important research on the principles of wine making and olive processing. The William Vere Cruess Papers, which span the years 1915-1965, contain writings, correspondence, memorabilia, and photographic materials related to his research in the areas of food processing, food preservation, and wine making.
    Physical location: Researchers should contact Special Collections to request collections, as many are stored offsite.
    Repository: University of California, Davis. General Library. Department of Special Collections.
    Davis, California 95616-5292
    Collection number: D-053
    Language of Material: Collection materials in English.

    Biography

    William Vere Cruess was born on August 9, 1886 in San Miguel, California to William V. and Lucy M. Withrow Cruess. He graduated with a B.S. degree in Chemistry from the University of California in 1911. In 1931 he received a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from Stanford University.
    Cruess spent his entire career working at the University of California, Berkeley, serving as an Assistant in Zymology (1911-1914), as Professor of Fruit Products (1914-1934), and as Professor of Food Technology (1934-1954).
    He began his work in food technology, under the direction of Professor Bioletti at the University of California, Berkeley, through the investigation of several principles of wine-making. His research on wine was halted in 1918 when the Prohibition Amendment was passed, but resumed when the 18th amendment was repealed.
    During the Prohibition years, Cruess turned his research efforts to the development of fruit products. Cruess and his colleagues established the principles and specifications which led to mechanical fruit dehydration as a method of overcoming the losses suffered by farmers from rain damage during sun drying. Cruess was a pioneer in the development of the use of fruits in production of fruit juices and fruit beverages and their bases (concentrates and syrups). He was one of the first investigators in the United States to use freezing storage for preservation of fruits and fruit products.
    Cruess also conducted a great deal of research on the bacteriological and chemical aspects of olive processing. He introduced the successful production of fermented green olives in California and investigated production problems and the development of new and improved olive products.
    William Vere Cruess passed away on March 13, 1968.
    Source:
    Joslyn, M.A., Mackinney, G., and Morgan, A.F. "William Vere Cruess." In Memoriam. [Berkeley, Calif. : Academic Senate], 1969.

    Scope and Content

    The William Vere Cruess Papers, which span the years 1915-1965, contain correspondence, writings, and memorabilia, and photographic materials related to his research in the areas of food processing, food preservation, and wine making.
    Letters in the Correspondence series pertain mostly to two subjects: the publication of Cruess's book Commercial Fruit and Vegetable Products and his 1923-1924 trip to Europe during which he studied the olive industry in France, Spain, and Italy. The Works by Cruess series contains his lecture notes as well as manuscripts and published versions of his writings. Manuscripts of his books: Commercial Fruit and Vegetable Products and The Principles and Practice of Wine Making are found in this series.
    More than half of the collection is made up of photographic materials which focus on aspects of food processing. Images of wine production and wineries as well as images of William Vere Cruess are also included.

    Arrangement of the Collection

    Arranged into seven series: 1. Correspondence 2. Works by Cruess 3. About Cruess 4. Others Works 5. Printed Material 6. Memorabilia and 7. Photographic Materials.

    Related collection

    The Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley also holds the W.V. Cruess Papers (3 linear feet).

    Indexing Terms

    The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.
    Cruess, W. V. (William Vere), 1886-1968--Archives.
    University of California, Berkeley--Faculty--Archives
    Canning and preserving
    Olive--Preservation
    Wine and wine making
    Food--Preservation

    Access

    Collection is open for research.

    Acquisition Information

    Donated by Mrs. Marie Cruess in 1968.

    Processing Information

    Sara Gunasekara was assisted by Jenny Hodge in the processing of this collection.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], William Vere Cruess Papers, D-053, Department of Special Collections, General Library, University of California, Davis.

    Publication Rights

    Copyright is protected by the copyright law, chapter 17, of the U.S. Code. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Head of Special Collections. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Department of Special Collections, General Library, University of California, Davis as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the researcher.