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Finding aid to the Joseph R. Goodman papers on Japanese American internment, 1941-1945, MS 840
MS 840  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Access
  • Publication Rights
  • Preferred Citation
  • Acquisition Information
  • Processing Information
  • Biographical Information
  • Scope and Contents
  • Bibliography

  • Title: Joseph R. Goodman papers on Japanese American internment
    Date: 1941-1945
    Collection Identifier: MS 840
    Creator: Goodman, Joseph R.
    Extent: 3 boxes, 1 half box, and 1 oversize box (3 linear ft.)
    Contributing Institution: California Historical Society
    678 Mission Street
    San Francisco, CA, 94105-4014
    (415) 357-1848
    reference@calhist.org
    URL: http://californiahistoricalsociety.org/
    Location of Materials: Collection is stored onsite.
    Language of Materials: Collection materials are in English, with some materials in English and Japanese.
    Abstract: Personal correspondence, organizational records, government documents, publications, and other papers created or collected by Joseph R. Goodman documenting the relocation and internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, as well as organized resistance to the internment. Included in the collection are records of the Japanese Young Men's Christian Association and the Japanese American Citizens League in San Francisco, including papers of the Japanese YMCA's executive secretary Lincoln Kanai; Sakai family papers; Goodman's correspondence to and from Japanese American internees, anti-internment organizations, the War Relocation Authority, and others; publications, photographs, and ephemera from the Topaz Relocation Center, where Goodman taught high school; War Relocation Authority records and publications; and newspaper clippings, pamphlets, and reports about the internment created by various government, religious, and civic organizations, in California and nationwide.

    Access

    Collection is open for research.

    Publication Rights

    All requests to reproduce, publish, quote from or otherwise use collection materials must be submitted in writing to the Director of Library and Archives, North Baker Research Library, California Historical Society, 678 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94105. Consent is given on behalf of the California Historical Society as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission from the copyright owner. Such permission must be obtained from the copyright owner. Restrictions also apply to digital representations of the original materials. Use of digital files is restricted to research and educational purposes.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Joseph R. Goodman papers on Japanese American internment, MS 840, California Historical Society.

    Acquisition Information

    Donated to the California Historical Society by Dr. Joseph R. Goodman in 1972. Three volumes ( Ramblings, hardcover, 1943, 1944, and 1945) were returned to Dr. Goodman in 1974.

    Processing Information

    The collection was processed by California Historical Society staff in 1972. Materials were rehoused in 2011.

    Biographical Information

    Joseph R. Goodman was a strong advocate for the Japanese American community in San Francisco and nationwide during World War II, providing assistance and support to friends and internees at the camps; aiding Japanese American students and activists; participating in the anti-internment movement; and, between 1942 and 1944, teaching high school math and science at the Topaz Relocation Center in Utah.
    Born in Tacoma, Washington, in 1911, Goodman moved to San Francisco in the early 1940s, where he met his wife Elizabeth Baker and worked as assistant superintendent of the Steinhart Aquarium. Active members of the American Friends Service Committee, the Goodmans began to assist and advocate for Japanese Americans evacuated from their homes in San Francisco, beginning in 1942. Among their friends were Lincoln Kanai, executive secretary of the San Francisco chapter of the Japanese Young Men's Christian Association and civil rights advocate; and the Sakai family, whose San Francisco home the Goodmans rented. (It later became the "Sakai House" cooperative.) Between 1942 and 1944, Goodman taught math and science at Topaz High School. Elizabeth Goodman also worked at the camp.
    After World War II, Goodman served as a professor at the Veterans Administration Hospital and in the pediatrics department at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). He died in 2004.

    Scope and Contents

    The collection consists of personal correspondence, organizational records, government documents, publications, and other papers created or collected by Joseph R. Goodman documenting the relocation and internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, as well as organized resistance to the internment. Included in the collection are records of the Japanese Young Men's Christian Association and the Japanese American Citizens League in San Francisco, including papers of the Japanese YMCA's executive secretary and civil rights advocate, Lincoln Kanai; Sakai family papers, including Ayako Sakai's letters from the Tanforan Assembly Center; Goodman's correspondence to and from Japanese American internees, anti-internment organizations, the War Relocation Authority, and others; publications, photographs, and ephemera from the Topaz Relocation Center, where Goodman taught high school; War Relocation Authority records and publications; and newspaper clippings, pamphlets, and reports about the internment created by various government, religious, and civic organizations, in California and nationwide.
    Comprising correspondence, reports, recommendations, notes, addresses, and other documents, Lincoln Kanai and the Japanese Young Men's Christian Association papers (1942) document conditions at the camps, as well as Kanai's involvement in the anti-internment movement. Included in these files are reports from the Puyallup, Tanforan, Pinedale, and Santa Anita Assembly Centers; written protests; and copies of letters from Robert Sproul and to Dorothea Lange. The records of the Japanese American Citizen League of San Francisco, also dated from 1942, include minutes, newsletters, bulletins, and correspondence documenting that organization's advocacy work on behalf of Japanese Americans during World War II. Ayako Sakai papers (1942-1943) comprise letters, poetry, and other documents, many of which were sent to Sakai by family members and friends while she was interned at the Tanforan Assembly Center in San Bruno.
    Joseph R. Goodman correspondence and other papers (1942-1943) include letters written to and from Goodman documenting his advocacy efforts on behalf of the Sakai family, Japanese American students, and the Japanese American community in San Francisco and nationwide. Correspondents include Goodman's friends Ayako Sakai, George Sakai, and Lincoln Kanai; the National Japanese American Student Relocation Council; the Fellowship of Reconciliation; the American Friends Service Committee, Northern California Section; the Northern California Committee on Fair Play for Citizens and Aliens of Japanese Ancestry; the Sakai House, a San Francisco cooperative; and the War Relocation Authority. Goodman's papers also include letters written to and by Lincoln Kanai, which Kanai copied for Goodman's files.
    In addition to these papers, the collection includes publications, photographs, and ephemera created at the Topaz Relocation Center (1942-1944), where Goodman taught high school science and math. Among these are the journals Volunteers for Victory, Topaz Times, All Aboard, and Trek; the Topaz High School newspaper Topazette; photographs of the Topaz High School football team; and a 1943 copy of Ramblings, the Topaz High School yearbook, owned by Lincoln Kanai.
    The collection also contains a wide variety of published material collected by Goodman documenting the Japanese American internment and anti-Japanese racism during World War II (1941-1945), including newspapers, especially the Nichi Bei; newspaper clippings; magazine articles; pamphlets; reports; and a scrapbook of newspaper clippings.

    Bibliography

    Sources consulted for the biographical note:
    Gathright, Alan, "Joseph Goodman -- UCSF pediatrics professor," San Francisco Chronicle, 2004 April 22.

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    Central Utah Relocation Center.
    Goodman, Joseph R.--Archives.
    Japanese American Citizens' League. San Francisco Chapter.
    Japanese Young Men's Christian Association (San Francisco, Calif.).
    Kanai, Lincoln.
    Sakai family.
    United States. War Relocation Authority.
    Japanese Americans--California.
    Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945.
    World War, 1939-1945--Evacuation of civilians.