Finding Aid for the Ravi Kalia Collection Relating to the Planning of Chandigarh, Punjab, India, ca. 1967-1983

Processed by Dan Luckenbill; machine-readable finding aid created by Caroline Cubé
© 2004
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

Finding Aid for the Ravi Kalia Collection Relating to the Planning of Chandigarh, Punjab, India, ca. 1967-1983

Collection number: 1364

UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections

Manuscripts Division



Los Angeles, CA
Processed by:
Dan Luckenbill, December 1984
Encoded by:
Caroline Cubé
Online finding aid edited by:
Josh Fiala, February 2004
© 2004 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

Descriptive Summary

Title: Ravi Kalia Collection Relating to the Planning of Chandigarh, Punjab, India,
Date (inclusive): ca. 1967-1983
Collection number: 1364
Creator: Kalia, Ravi
Extent: 6 boxes (3 linear ft.)
Repository: University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Dept. of Special Collections.
Los Angeles, California 90095-1575
Abstract: With the partition of India in 1947, Lahore, the ancient capital of the Indian state of Punjab, became part of Pakistan. As other towns served as the temporary capital, a site at the center of the Indian state was chosen to create an entirely new capital city. The first Chandigarh plan was prepared by Albert Mayer, a New York architect who had spent time in India in World War II. From his basic plan, the French architect Le Corbusier continued, assisted by his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret, and the English couple E. Maxwell Fry and Jane B. Drew, in turn assisted by various Indian professionals. Meyer's plan incorporated neighborhood sector concepts and green belts. The collection consists of government publications and photocopies of memos, documents, contracts, correspondence, and articles from journals relating to the development of Chandigarh and the theory of urban planning.
Physical location: Stored off-site at SRLF. Advance notice is required for access to the collection. Please contact the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections Reference Desk for paging information.
Language: English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Use and Reproduction

Property rights to the physical object belong to the UCLA Library, Department of Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, are retained by the creators and their heirs. It is the responsibility of the researcher to determine who holds the copyright and pursue the copyright owner or his or her heir for permission to publish where The UC Regents do not hold the copyright.

Restrictions on Access

COLLECTION STORED OFF-SITE AT SRLF: Advance notice required for access.

Provenance/Source of Acquisition

Ravi Kalia, purchase, 1984.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Ravi Kalia Collection Relating to the Planning of Chandigarh, Punjab, India (Collection 1364). Department of Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, University of California, Los Angeles.

UCLA Catalog Record ID

UCLA Catalog Record ID: 1972942 

Biography

With the partition of India in 1947, Lahore, the ancient capital of the Indian state of Punjab, became part of Pakistan. As other towns served as the temporary capital, a site at the center of the Indian state was chosen to create an entirely new capital city. The first Chandigarh plan was prepared by Albert Mayer, a New York architect who had spent time in India in World War II. From his basic plan, the French architect Le Corbusier continued, assisted by his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret, and the English couple E. Maxwell Fry and Jane B. Drew, in turn assisted by various Indian professionals. Meyer's plan incorporated neighborhood sector concepts and green belts.

Biographical Narrative

With the partition of India in 1947, Lahore, the ancient capital of the state of Punjab, went to Pakistan. After temporary capitals, a site at the center of the state was chosen - for its central location, natural features, and inspiring setting - to create an entirely new city. This offered various planners and architects the opportunity to put into practice their theories of urban planning and prived later theorists with a project for study. The first Chandigarh plan was prepared by Albert Mayer, a New York architect who had spent time in India in World War II. From his basic plan, the French architect Le Corbusier continued, assisted by his cousin, Piere Jeanneret, and the English couple E. Maxwell Fry and Jane B. Drew, in turn assisted by various Indian professionals.

Scope and Content

Collection consists of government publications and photocopies of memos, documents, contracts, correspondence, and articles from journals relating to the development of Chandigarh and the theory of urban planning. Includes blueprints, maps, brochures, audiotape interviews with planners, and publications relating to political problems and conflicts of Chandigarh and the Punjab.

Expanded Scope and Content

These materials were assembled by Ravi Kalia for his dissertation, completed in the UCLA Department of History, 1984. The materials consist of government publications and photocopies of memos, documents, contracts, correspondence, and articles from journals relating to the development of Chandigarh and the theory of urban planning. There is a small amount of correspondence iniitiated by Mr. Kalia, notably a letter from Maxwell Fry, detailing his attitudes toward the work of Le Corbusier. The papers document the reality of this city which Jawaharlal Nehru saw as “symbolic of the freedom of India unfettered by the traditions of the past.” Mayer's plan incorporated neighborhood sector concepts and green belts and the architects sought (in Drew's words) to “combine something of the philosophic detachment of the east with the industrialization of the west.” later items in the collection give details of the present-day political difficulties.

Organization and Arrangement

Arranged in the following series:
  1. Albert Mayer, E. Maxwell Fry and Jane Drew, and Jeet Malhotra (Box 1).
  2. Le Corbusier, Jawaharlal Nehru, M.S. Randhawa (Box 2).
  3. Articles, clippings, blueprints, maps, brochures, and cassette interviews of city planning and Chandigarh (Box 3).
  4. Government publications (Boxes 4-5).
  5. Draft of Chandigarh regional plan and publications relating to Chandigarh and the Punjab (Box 6).

Indexing Terms

The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.
Kalia, Ravi--Archives.
City planning--India--Chandigarh--Archival resources.
Punjab (India)--History--Sources.


Container List

Box 1, Folders 1-4

(Copies from the University of Chicago, Joseph Regenstein Library).

Creator/Collector: Meyer, Albert
Box 1, Folder 5

(Includes letter).

Creator/Collector: Fry, E. Maxwell and Drew, Jane
Box 1, Folder 6

Letter, enclosing paper on Chandigarh pollution.

Creator/Collector: Malhotra, Jeet
Box 2, Folder 1

(Photocopies from Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris).

Creator/Collector: Le Corbusier
Box 2, Folder 2

(Copies from the Prime Minister's Office).

Creator/Collector: Nehru, Jawaharial
Box 2, Folder 3

(Copies from the Chandigarh Museum).

Creator/Collector: Randhawa, M.S.
Box 2, Folder 4

Publications.

Creator/Collector: Randhawa, M.S.
Box 3, Folder 1

Articles, clippings, copies of correspondence on city planning and Chandigarh.

Box 3, Folder 2

Newspaper articles and clippings re Chandigarh and the Punjab.

Box 3, Folder 3

Blueprints and maps of Chandigarh.

Box 3, Folder 4

Ranjitgarh new City descriptive brochure.

Box 3, Folder 5

Guide/map of Haryana.

Box 3, Folder 6

Cassettes: interviews with those involved in planning[?].

Physical Description: Names illegible.
Box 4

Government publications, including the Chandigarh code.

Box 5

Government publications, including various acts, 1949-1966 and Plan, 1982-1983.

Box 6, Folder 1

Chandigarh regional plan (draft), 1982.

Physical Description: Photocopy.
Box 6, Folder 2

Publications relating to Chandigarh and the Punjab.

Scope and Content Note

Primarily India Today Magazine, detailing conflicts affecting Chandigarh.