Jump to Content

Collection Guide
Collection Title:
Collection Number:
Get Items:
Guide to the N.A. Chandler Gold Rush Era Letters
Consult repository  
View entire collection guide What's This?
PDF (95.12 Kb) HTML
Search this collection
 
 
Table of contents What's This?

Collection Contents

Box 1, Folder 1

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1855 January 15

Abstract: This letter was written on Chandler's arrival in San Francisco by boat. Chandler recounted the circumstances of his journey, the food, and the differences between cabin fare and steerage fare, and the "very bad" circumstances of deck passengers. "They won't give the deck people even a crust that is left." "I think I shall like the country well." Chandler mentioned that "stonecutters get seven dollars pr day on the custom house building must try the mines first." Chandler writes that he doesn't know where he will stop, but is going north first, near the Yuba, by steamboat. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Arrival in California."
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 2 pages long"
Box 1, Folder 2

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Long Bar on a pictorial letter sheet titled "The Miners' Lamentations." 1855 September 3

Abstract: Chandler writes that the rivers are very dry and the work pays about 4 dollars pr day. The claims are considered very good and when the rains come they "shall be prepared to work to good advantage." "I mean to take things cool at present if I don't get rich the first year." "We have lots of good living in the way of Mellons, Tomatoes the mellons are far superior to any I ever saw in our Atlantic Home, in size and flavor. I wish I could send you one mellon as large as we have here you would have to ask all the neighbors in to eat it." Chandler writes that he thinks he has made several hundred dollars, but it is in the claim and will be due on what he has sold. On the opposite side of the picture, Chandler writes "you need not think me a Bachelor nor that this case is mine in particular." [referring to the Miners' Lamentations] This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "1855."
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 3

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Long Bar on a pictorial letter sheet titled "How the California Mines are Worked." 1855 September 30

Abstract: Chandler writes that "water has failed at our claims so we cannot work to advantage." "Wages are lower now on act of so many being idle in the Dry diggins $3.50 is the common price on the river for 10 hours work." "I have considerable money due me from some of the partners as soon as we can take it out." Chandler also writes that his neighbors, the Burnetts, have a son who was in the battle of Mexico and is a lawyer who was recently elected as Senator from Yuba County. "Young Burnett is a very sociable fellow none of those starched up puppies that we see at Home he is only 25 yrs old he has gone to the Atlantic states to get him a wife so his mother says." Chandler also mentions that he is frequently invited to tea with Mrs. Burnett, but pleads for Jane to not be jealous, "for the Old gent is generally about." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "1855" and this letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 4

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Long Bar. 1855 November 11

Abstract: Chandler writes that "it takes a person who is a stranger in Cala some considerable time to get the right hang of mining profitably it is much better to have experienced friends here." He also mentions that there are "plenty of Mahalas about our digins (Squaw), they have got near done gathering acorns and grasshoppers for this season. The live high and sleep under the trees." Chandler also warns all who are coming to come by way of the Panama Route, because "there has been a great complaint against the other route, and much sickness." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Prospector operations and general outlook. Squaws and their avocations." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 5

Letter from N.A. Chandler to J. M. Chandler, written from Long Bar. 1856 April 16

Abstract: Chandler writes that he likes "the mining business first rate although it is very hard generally." Chandler also writes to his wife that he feels bad because he hasn't been able to send Jane and others money, but "we can't pick up the gold now as easily as they once could." Chandler writes, "I think there is plenty of gold in Cala to answer my purpose if I could only find it, and that I am trying to do." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Hard work the miner's portion." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 6

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Long Bar. 1856 July 31

Abstract: Chandler mentions that in Jane's last letter she wrote that she would come out if he thought it best and wished her to, but then writes, "But still I think you hardly feel like coming." He mentions that "there is a good many women coming to Cala, there is three in this place." He also writes that "there is a little village here called Pinchumtight (we have some queer names for places)." Chandler then responds to another letter he received from Jane indicating that their parents oppose the idea of Jane coming to Cala. Chandler writes that he will give it up and "be content to keep bachelor hall a while longer." Chandler writes that he intends to stay as he can "never think of going home to work for a living by the day or job." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Sluicing the main occupation at that time. Curious Place-names." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 7

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Long Bar. 1856 September 7

Abstract: Chandler writes that his steam engine has failed, and they are putting up a water wheel to pump in the mean time. He hired a "Chinaman" to work with a rocker, and the "Chinaman" made "between 24 + 25 Dollars pr Day." Chandler also mentions that he has put all his money into a claim in hopes of getting more, but then writes that "mining in river claims is a kind of lottery." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Installing a water wheel to pump our claim. Hired Chinaman with rocker a profitable venture." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title. This letter does not indicate the year, but based on the days of the week mentioned in the letter and the location compared to other letters from Chandler, the year could only be 1856.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 8

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Long Bar. 1856 October 2

Abstract: Chandler says that he has been forced to put up a water wheel at a cost of 500 dollars, and has been "Camping on the Bank of the Yuba in a factory cloth cabin and not sewed together very well." Jane is advised to "tell the boys not to vote for [Fremont] in the presidential election, referring to Fremont by saying, "The wooley Horse won't succeed in this state I think." Chandler ends his letter with a post script mentioning that his partners "all belong to the Sons of Temperance so you ars shure suppose that my company is not all bad." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Fremont Buchanan Campaign." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 9

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Long Bar. 1856 December 17

Abstract: Chandler writes that his "luck has been poor," and pleads for Jane to not be discouraged. Chandler writes of his new partner, Simon Adams, and mentions that Adams is "quite a gunner he kills hares, Quail, and we have had a nice hare for supper this Even. We can cook nearly as well as a woman." Chandler mentions that he expects to eat something nice for Christmas, "for we have a promise from a Lady to cook the game if we will get it. I think it a bargain but Adams will have to kill the game I think." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Somewhat out of luck but, don't be discouraged Jane. Prospects favorable for Xmas dinner." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 10

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Long Bar. 1857 February 2

Abstract: Chandler writes of his struggles against claim jumpers, who are a "real Murder and Robber party" and a lawsuit that resulted in a hung jury. Chandler finds legal justice difficult, writing that "It is hard to get justice in Cala, except to shoot or hang the raskals." Chandler also promises Jane that if she would come to California he would "make some permanent location for the time we stayed as soon as possible." Chandler writes that Jane "would like mining first rate as the women do generally I think." He warns that "it is dangerous for a man to have his wife here, for they often leave their husbands and join the wicked world in the cities or villages and show off in silks + velvets for a season but that class of people come from the South and Western states and are generally quite an Ignorant class of beings." Chandler also praises the healthy climate of California by writing, "almost all who are declining receive [sic] their health in this country." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Claim Jumpers." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 11

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Alpha. 1857 March 15

Abstract: Chandler writes that one man from a "party of raskals" that drove Chandler from his claim tried to repay him, but a thief stole the money from the man. Chandler washes his dirt by hydraulking. Chandler writes about a storekeeper in Alpha who was struck over the head and stabbed several times, possibly by a Frenchman. Regarding the victim, Chandler writes that "there is no hopes of his living." Chandler writes that he would like to know how his son Willie is doing, and how the ring he sent to his daughter May fits. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Claim Jumpers." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 12

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Alpha. 1857 November 11

Abstract: Chandler mentions the George Law disaster, and that he knew some who were on the ship. He finished working on "the big ditch Tunnell" and is now staying in Alpha with a young man. Chandler also suggests that he would like to stay two or three years if his claims pay well, and if he could convince Jane "that it is the most romantic place in the mountains." Chandler also wishes that Jane could see the camp and Chinese Cooks. Chandler writes that he "must give Cala a good trial before [he] leaves her." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "A mining camp described, Alpha diggings, the most romantic place in the mountains." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 14

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Alpha. 1857 December 15

Abstract: Chandler is unhappy that Jane hasn't written in "about two months," and pleads with Jane to write "oftener." Chandler mentions his assessment fees and writes that he does not plan to get in any more debt if he can avoid it. Chandler has read about and makes allusion to a general economic depression in the States (the Panic of 1857). This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Rough going." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 15

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Alpha. 1858 January 15

Abstract: Chandler writes that he has received Jane's letters from October and November, which were miscarried to Omega. He also writes that "the Mormons have been moving for Salt Lake and sell out cheap." He predicts that "Uncle Sam will have a brush with the Saints soon" and writes that several men are ready to go to Salt Lake to "get a widow out there as the Mormons have more than their share." Chandler describes the mining process of sluicing and washing gravel. Chandler also writes about a wedding the previous week between a 14 year old "little girl" and a 45 year old man. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Mining operations depicted, tunnel and sluice method described. " "We expect Uncle Sam will have a brush with the Saints (Mormons) soon." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 16

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Alpha. 1858 February 15

Abstract: Chandler mentions that he had a good Christmas dinner, "cooked first rate by the Lady Cook." He also writes that "Alpha is the most temperate town or village in the mountains" and that "most of the boys belong to the Sons of Temperance." The "big ditch" has also had some problems with landslides, causing interruption of the water supply. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Tunnel and washing operations discussed, trouble with the 'big ditch' due to land slides. Xmas cheer." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 17

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Alpha. 1858 March 11

Abstract: Chandler writes that he washed his gold last week and "got about 50 dollars" in four days. He recounts the story of a man named Brenan (spelled in the letter Brannan), who committed suicide by poison on 1858 February 21 in Grass Valley with his wife and three children. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Brannan Tragedy." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title. This letter does not indicate the year, but based on Chandler's references his daughter Liss, it is less than 1860, when Liss died. Further, it is unlikely that Chandler wrote twice in March of 1857 or 1859, which leaves 1858. Also, the location of this letter places it within this time frame, in addition to the Brenan suicide correlation.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 2 pages long
Box 1, Folder 18

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Alpha. 1858 August 15

Abstract: Chandler writes of a party of Indians who skirmished with a party of overland emigrant prospectors on the way to Vancouver Island gold prospects. Chandler also writes on the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush on Vancouver Island and the difficulty that prospectors face with regard to adequate provisions. Chandler asks if Jane would be willing to allow Lissy to come to California, adding that "she could wash the fishes when she gets a little older" and [he] could cook them. He also mentions that "there [are] lots of little girls here and [they] go to all the balls when they are six years [old] and dance like tops." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Indians." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 19

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Gaston Ridge. 1858 December 15

Abstract: Chandler writes that he has been building a log cabin. While he is writing the letter, several men are around and one "Chinaman," a cook, is asking questions about the meaning of words that Chandler is writing. Chandler allows the "Chinaman" to write on the letter. This letter contains a brief paragraph containing a translation of Chinese writing written by a Chinese man named Ah Pay as shown on the third page of this folio. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Chinaman's Postscript." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title. This letter does not indicate the year, but the year must be 1858 because a Wednesday on the 15th day of December could only be 1858 or 1869. Since his daughter May is alive, it must be 1858. (May died in 1860.)
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 20

Letter from Jane M. Chandler to N.A. Chandler, written from Lowell, Massachusetts on a pictorial letter sheet titled "Statistics of Lowell Manufactures, 1859." 1859 February 27

Abstract: Jane Chandler writes about health of family and acquaintances. She writes about her financial circumstances and what led her to go to work in Lowell's mills. Speaking of her financial situation, she writes, "I am as willing to work for a living as any one, and all the reason I have not before was on the children's account" You seem to rejoice that you have driven me to it by not sending me any money." She explains why she would not like to move to California permanently. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "A few words from The Misses, her only letter in the lot."
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 21

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Nevada. 1859 March 17

Abstract: Chandler discourages Jane from working in the mills. He compares factory girls to servants and then describes California women, writing that "you would think to see them that they were mostly queens." He writes of the variety of females from different nations, and of "Spanish dance houses." He also mentions that a Spanish woman struck her abusive husband with a dirk and was locked up and tried in court, but later cleared on the grounds of "Justifiable Self Defense." He writes that if his daughter May "will have her ears bored" he will send her some earrings. He may attend the local theater to see "The Virginia Minstrels" and "pass off the time. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Objects to his wife taking a job in a Lowell mill, compares the working woman's status in Nevada and in Mass. 'Spanish Dance Houses' Hotels: 'Virginia Minstrels.'" This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 22

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Alpha. 1859 May 15

Abstract: Chandler describes his brother Charles's arrival and writes that he "doesn't think mining will suit Charlie very well." When Charles first arrived, Chandler "did not know him from the man in the moon, neither did he me." If he does well in the summer, Chandler plans to travel to the U.S. or send money for Jane to come to him in the fall. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Trials of the Tender-foot, Renewal of acquaintance with brother Charles, the writer hires some men, contemplates a trip from Utah to the U.S." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 23

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Nevada. 1859 August 27

Abstract: Chandler describes his new prospects in Nevada near the Carson and Truckee Rivers. He describes the Mormons in the area as an "awful looking set of people" who "look nearly as bad off as the Piute Indians which are our neighbors." He writes about Mormon women, one of which said "she would marry any poor good looking young man who would take her to Cala." He also writes about the Piute, who "are a very civil but numerous tribe" and their agent, Col. Dodge. Chandler writes that the settlers "have had a convention of people for making a new Territory called Nevada Territory." Chandler visited the Washoe Tribe of Indians, mentioning that "they committed some depredations this past winter" but he thinks "the whites are more to blame than the Indians, they use them shamefully very often." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "No law here (Utah Territory) " Convention held for making a new territory to be called Nevada Territory. Hardships of Mormons and other Emigrants. Indians treated "shamefully." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 24

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Nevada. 1859 November 3

Abstract: Chandler has moved to Utah Territory in the vicinity of the Carson and Truckee Rivers. He built a stone cabin, and is boarding a family from Massachusetts at present. He writes that he "sometimes gets homesick for a while, but when I come to think that a man is not of much account [without] money, then I am more determined not to return until I can meet the expectations of the folks at home." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Rich diggings in Utah (Nevada?) "My prospects better now than they ever have been Regular 49 Times." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 25

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1860 January 12

Abstract: Chandler writes of the hard winter due to cold, but that he has "a very warm stone cabin, a good stove, and plenty wood for the present." Chandler writes that "the richest diggings ever discovered are here," and he almost had an interest in a company that sold a claim for 240,000 dollars. Chandler writes of his experience with the Piute and Washoe tribes of Indians, telling how he and some other miners tried to help some Indians who were freezing to death. "We tried to catch the young scamps but they yelled like murder so we let them go we heard afterwards they had frozen to death." He also writes of the suffering of an emigrant family whose "teams had died on the road and were out of provisions." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Sufferings of Indians and Emigrants." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 26

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1860 March 10

Abstract: Chandler writes on the bonanzas of the Virginia City vicinity, and the large crowds of people. "Every house, stable, and tent is full every night and many sleep in tunnels or holes in the ground." He has been keeping books for some companies while waiting out the winter. He also describes the Indians as harmless, but "they are big beggars, they will beg you out grub and clothes if you allow them about." Chandler recommends Jane not go to Lowell any more, "except you wish to get married again." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Bonanzas and booms in Utah (Nevada?) diggings." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title. This letter does not indicate the year, but the year must be 1860 because it is after the arrival of Charles in November 1859 and before the death of Lucian in August 1861. In March 1861 Chandler was in the Eastern United States.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 27

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1860 April 13

Abstract: Chandler writes on the rush to Virginia City, and the high sales prices of some claims. He writes that his "most extravagant expectations are very likely to be realized in a short time, but from 20 to 100 thousand is not considered much of a raise in this country of silver and gold." He writes that the Pony Express arrived last evening in 8 days and 20 hours. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Great expectations. Pony Express." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 28

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1860 May 30

Abstract: Chandler visits Oakland from San Francisco, and describes the Oakland area. He has had trouble settling his accounts in Virginia City because of the recent Indian troubles, and writes that the Volunteers and Regulars have had a brush with them "this morning." Chandler writes on San Francisco, mentioning that "the people here call it Morral [sic] now but our New England friends would not think so perhaps." Chandler writes on San Francisco's cultural attractions and women. He also writes on the way women dress in San Francisco. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Amusements of San Francisco, Adornment of the women." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 29

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1860 June 19

Abstract: Chandler writes about the retaking of the first battle ground of the Paiute Indian War of 1860, the discovery of Captain Storey's body and his burial, which Chandler attended. He writes that General Haven and Colonel Jack Hayes came over with him to organize a force and "give them all a whipping." He writes that he has good prospects and would like to go to Europe if he is successful. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Indian Troubles, Trip to Europe." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 30

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1860 June 28

Abstract: Chandler writes on his interest in mining claims around Virginia City and Alpha. He writes that "fortune has seemed to frown on all my undertakings until the last few months" but now "I can realize more money from my last years work than I ever expected to have." Chandler also writes that he visited a fortune teller who told him that he is "to hear of the death of a male relation soon." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Changing Luck." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 31

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1860 August 19

Abstract: Chandler writes of his sorrow upon receiving word that his daughter May has died. He writes that he visited a spiritualist in San Francisco in July and was told of the death of a blood relation, but he "did not know that it was our Dear Child May." He writes of his plans to return in September and be with Jane. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Death of Children, Consolation through spiritualism." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 2 pages long
Box 1, Folder 32

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1860 November 17

Abstract: Chandler writes that he must go to Virginia City to settle his accounts "before going east." His mines are "proving very rich in Utah exceeding the expectations of the most Sanguine." He writes to console Jane after the recent loss of their child May. This letter contains notations in pencil on the bottom of the last page with reference to some topics of the letter. This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the notes.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 33

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1861 April 9

Abstract: Chandler writes that he caught the ague fever in Acapulco, but is now "safe and sound although [he] had a very long passage over 26 days." A man named Mr. Payne has been quite sick since arriving in California. Chandler finds "trade in Washoe stock quite dull at present" and intends to go over the mountains to sell his house in Virginia City for 1000 dollars if he can. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "2nd Arrival in California." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 2 pages long
Box 1, Folder 34

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1861 April 30

Abstract: Chandler writes that "some think we shall have war here, but the most think the troubles east will not affect us for worse" we have the News of the Taking of Fort Sumpter [sic]" Mr. Payne died of yellow fever; "It was a very sad affair." Chandler writes on agriculture in California. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "War Rumors, Fall of Fort Sumter, Pony Express 8 or x days from St. Louis." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 35

Letter N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1861 May 15

Abstract: Chandler writes on various legal affairs pertaining to his property ownership. He writes that he is sorry to hear that Jane doesn't "enjoy [her] breakfasts better" adding that "some mornings I am in the same way." He adds, "I think you will be all right soon if the Boy does well and doesn't turn to a girl." Chandler also asks if they think the North is going to "whip the South" and subject to the Black Administration and adds, "if they do they will be fooled Mightily." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Copperheadism." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title. The last page has notations in pencil which reads: "Little stranger discounted." (Referring to an unborn child.)
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 36

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1861 June 8

Abstract: Chandler writes that his "interests have suffered some for want of attention" and that some of his claims were "Jumped." He still has valuable claims, and has had offers to sell. He writes that "the Southern feeling or Succession people are about equal to the Union" and that "we had the Succession flag here flying yesterday." "Troops from Fort Churchill came in and demanded the U.S. arms in the hands of people since the Indian trouble last year." Chandler hopes that the abolitionists "will all be sent to the South and put in the front of the battle as they are responsible for all this trouble." He encourages Jane to tell their friends not to enlist in the cause, adding that "their chances will be small for getting back in three years." He ends by asking Jane to "write how all the little Boys are doing" (emphasis in original). This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Anti-Abolitionist Sentiments." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 37

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1861 August 25

Abstract: Chandler writes that he expects to sell soon, and that "the mines here are proving very rich especially about Gold Hill and Virginia and that one would hardly know the place now as one year ago." He also writes that "Governor Nye is here" and that they have an election for organizing the Territory and sending a member to Congress to "put Lincoln's war policy men to flight." Chandler adds that "many men have left for the East to fight, mostly for the South." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Anti-war Sentiments Lincoln's hirelings" and their "destructive policy" This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title. This letter does not indicate the year, but the year must be 1861 because it references the organization of the Nevada Territory. The first election after the organization occurred on August 31, 1861, or as Chandler wrote, "next week."
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 38

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1862 January 10

Abstract: Chandler writes that "Sacramento and all the valley has been all under water" and that "Horses, Cattle, and Houses have been carried away." He writes that there is much excitement over some discoveries above Oregon called the Caraboo (Caribou) Mines, in the "British Dominion." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Flood in Sacramento Valley, New gold discovered in the British Dominion." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 39

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1862 March 10

Abstract: Chandler writes that he is happy to hear that they have another daughter born to them, and proposes to call her Mary Jane. He writes about a woman named Mrs. Hanabal, who is from Hartland, who may have gotten pregnant without her husband. He asks Jane to "say nothing that I write you but see what color the baby is and let me know." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "A Little Stranger. Scandal in another quarter." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 40

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1862 October 10

Abstract: Chandler writes that he has become "tired of living in this country in this way" and he is "tired of a bachelor's life." He prefers a common name for the baby and gives consent to name the baby as Jane chooses. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "The time will come yet when an honest white man will be as much respected as a Negro (Greeley excepted)." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 41

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1863 February 1

Abstract: Chandler writes that he has "had rather dull times to sell stock in mines but the prospects are better now." He writes to encourage Jane to come out to him. Chandler describes Virginia City and the mines. He writes of "Old Abe's Thieves in the shape of Federal Tax collectors" and that "the Repb course is dead or nearly so here, the people don't swallow the Emancipation course." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Harsh words for Uncle Abe's Govt." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 42

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1863 April 8

Abstract: Chandler explains his problem with a land deed, and enlists Jane's help. He explains that he has lost a lot of money "by bad debts and fall of stocks." Chandler writes about his money problems and leaves instructions for Jane. He also writes a small note to Willie, offering suggestions for names for Willie's colt, including "Uncle Abe," "Jeff Davis," and "Monitor." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "A family real estate transaction. Chandler the cynic. Tell Father A to keep his head cool and feet dry. Uncle Abe won't get us two in the draw cause we ant Round if we was we are to old and if we ant to old xxx." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 43

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1863 July 26

Abstract: Chandler writes that he is satisfied with present prospects and has purchased some house lots in San Francisco. Chandler explains his business interests and the wealth that surrounds him. "I was one of the first six to come here in /59, we used then to sleep in the Sedg brush, we now have fine Hotels and private houses." He encourages Jane to travel west to be with him. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Prospects Improving." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 44

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1863 November 11

Abstract: Chandler gives an update of his mining investments and property holdings. He lists many common acquaintances, mostly from Medford, whom he has seen. He writes Jane to "Tell father to be a peace Democrat, if they do call him Copperhead, I am with him." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Prosperity- 6% a month, Opposed to War, Peace on almost any terms." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 45

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1864 February 8

Abstract: Chandler writes that he has "cleared six thousand dollars on the rise of stocks within the last month, mostly in the Lady Bryan." He doesn't "feel like going to Mass or any other Black Republican state while the war is going on." He encourages Jane to come west with the children, offering to pay their way. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Easy money in mining stocks, Hard knocks for "Old Abe" and his abolition war." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 46

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from San Francisco. 1864 March 13

Abstract: Chandler gives an update of his anticipated stock values, writing that he manages them via the Territorial Enterprise. He describes the drought conditions of California and Nevada. Chandler reassures Jane of his intentions and plans to come home. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "More Prosperity. California drought. Family Jars." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 47

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1864 August 14

Abstract: Chandler writes that the times have been "running very rough in the Spring and Summer as well as with most others." He blames the U.S. Government for mining stock failures, and mentions that he "resigned [his] position in the Lady Bryan mine on account of the hard times." He encourages Jane to write oftener. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Black Republican administration, Civil war." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 48

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1865 April 10

Abstract: Chandler writes about his financial losses, and a visit that he made to a fortune teller. He writes what an "Old Fortune Teller" told him regarding his past and future. He recounts the excitement of the city on Lee's surrender to Grant, but holds some doubt of it because "the wires don't always bring the truth." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Hard times " "My luck runs wild." "Our city crazy with excitement on account of Lee's surrender to Grant!" This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 49

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1865 April 30

Abstract: Chandler writes that he is thinking of settling down soon, countering Jane's assertion that Chandler will not come home. He writes on the reaction to Lincoln's assassination. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Assassination of Lincoln." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 50

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Virginia City. 1865 November 26

Abstract: Chandler writes that "it has been very hard times here in Mineing [sic] operations this year." Chandler laments separation from his wife and regards his condition as if "everyone's curse is on me." He mentions that the editor of the Territorial Enterprise mistakenly sent the subscription to Hartford instead of Hartland. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "The writer is a bit low in his mind. Ups and downs in the miner's lot." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 51

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Hamilton. 1869 December 22

Abstract: Chandler addresses concerns that he has been unfaithful to Jane, and asserts his innocence. He has had some "sickness and bruises by a fall from a building which hurt [him] very bad." He writes of his living circumstances for the past several years. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Not guilty!" This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 52

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Hamilton. 1870 November 16

Abstract: Chandler writes that "times have been very dull in regards to selling mines" and that "Capitalists are afraid except they see all their money in sight." He writes that he is near the Utah line and that the Mormons "are very cautious about thier [sic] wives while living among gentiles." He writes on the November 8th 1870 elections in Nevada and the new Governor, Lewis R. Bradley. This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Dull times in mining operations. Cautious Mormons. Black and Tan Republicans wiped up in late election." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 3 pages long
Box 1, Folder 53

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Eureka. 1871 May 7

Abstract: Chandler has been working as a stonecutter. He corrects Jane's notion that people in Eureka "are all a rough set of people." He asserts that "this is a much better place to be poor in than New England." Chandler discourages consulting mediums and feels that "they are the biggest humbugs in existence." He criticizes his Brothers and writes, "you may doubt it, but I do not think of dying a drunkard." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Yankees rated below par, mediums likewise." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long
Box 1, Folder 54

Letter from N.A. Chandler to Jane M. Chandler, written from Eureka. 1872 June 9

Abstract: Chandler writes that he is putting all his money into a new mine. He describes Eureka and its resources. He expects to go to the World's Fair in 1876. Chandler writes that he favors Greeley over Grant. Chandler extols the virtues of California weather and the seasons as it pertains to health, adding that in the interior of California, "people do not usually die until thier [sic] time comes." This letter contains notations in pencil on the first page at the top which reads: "Promising outlook for paying ore at Eureka. Favors Greeley in the Greeley-Grant Presidential campaign. California climate." This letter also contains pencil marks to highlight certain parts of the text pertaining to the title.
Physical Description: 1 autographed letter signed, 4 pages long