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Finding Aid for the Pierre Loti Correspondence 1866-1905
MS.2003.003  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Descriptive Summary
  • Access
  • Publication Rights
  • Preferred Citation
  • Acquisition Information
  • Processing History
  • Biography
  • Scope and Content
  • Arrangement
  • Indexing Terms

  • Descriptive Summary

    Title: Pierre Loti Correspondence,
    Date (inclusive): 1866-1905
    Collection number: MS.2003.003
    Creator: Loti, Pierre, 1850-1923
    Extent: 1 box 2.5 linear inches
    Repository: William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
    Los Angeles, California 90018
    Abstract: Letters written by French author Pierre Loti to members of his family from approximately 1866-1905.
    Physical location: Clark Library
    Language of Material: Collection materials in French

    Access

    Collection is open for research.

    Publication Rights

    Copyright has not been assigned to the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Librarian. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.

    Preferred Citation

    [Identification of item], Pierre Loti Correspondence, MS.2003.003, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of California, Los Angeles.

    Acquisition Information

    Purchase, 2003.

    Processing History

    Processed by Rebecca Fenning, August 2009.

    Biography

    Julien Viaud, who would later assume the pseudonym of Pierre Loti, was born born January 14, 1850 in Rochefort, France. Because of family financial and legal problems, Loti was allowed to follow in his late older brother's footsteps and enroll in the naval academy at Brest in 1867. During his time as a naval officer, Loti traveled widely and gathered material for his future novels in such places as Tahiti, Turkey, Senegal, and Japan. His first novel, Aziyadé was published in 1879, and was followed by many many other works, including Le mariage de Loti (1880), Mon frere Yves (1883), Pêcheur d'Islande (1886), Madame Chrysanthème (1887), Le Roman d'un Enfant (1890), Ramuntcho (1897) and Les Désenchantées (1906).
    Loti was inducted into the Académie française in 1892. His naval career was of the greatest importance to him, and he reached the rank of captain before being placed on the reserve list in 1910, though he returned to volunteer throughout the First World War.
    Loti died 1923 at Hendaye, in the Basque country, one of his most beloved places.

    Scope and Content

    Letters written by French author and naval officer Pierre Loti to his family during the period 1866-1905. The majority of letters are written to his niece Nadine "Ninet" Duvignau (nee Bon), though there are also a significant number written to his sister Marie Viaud Bon. Topics often concern family finances, social engagements, travels, and writing. Other correspondents include Gustave Duvignau and Armand Bon.

    Arrangement

    At some previous time, these letters were in the possession of a family member who annotated them in pencil, supplying estimated dates and background information for many of them, and numbering each one consecutively from 1-56. Because most letters do not include dates, the original, numbered order imposed by the previous owner has been retained. In most places, it appears to be roughly chronological.

    Indexing Terms

    The following terms have been used to index the description of this collection in the library's online public access catalog.

    Subjects

    Bon, Armand
    Bon, Marie Viaud
    Duvignau, Gustave
    Duvignau, Nadine Bon
    Authors, French--19th century--Correspondence

    Genres and Forms

    Letters--France--19th century