Jump to Content

Collection Guide
Collection Title:
Collection Number:
Get Items:
Inventory of the Howard A. Friedman Collection
2000-12  
View entire collection guide What's This?
PDF (235.09 Kb) HTML
Search this collection
Collection Overview
 
Table of contents What's This?
Description
Howard A. Friedman was born in New York City in 1919. In 1949, he graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with a degree in architecture. After several years with San Francisco architecture firms, in 1953 he formed his own practice, which in 1967 became Howard A. Friedman and Associates. Friedman worked as an architect and planner until 1982. During 35 years of practice, Howard's firm compiled a distinguished record of nationally recognized designs, with projects in Northern California, Nevada, Georgia, Texas, Mexico, France, Holland, and Spain. In 1980 he was appointed Professor in the Department of Architecture at UC Berkeley. He retired from private practice in 1984, in part to devote more time to teaching and academic affairs. The bulk of this collection consists of photographs documenting Howard Friedman's architectural work. Materials relating to Friedman's time as faculty at UC Berkeley make up the remainder of the collection .
Background
Howard A. Friedman was born in New York City on June 26, 1919. At the age of 17, following graduation from Saunders Technical High School in Yonkers, he started work as a junior drafter in a Manhattan architecture office. In 1942 he joined the United States Navy Seabees and served in the Pacific during World War II. On his return to San Francisco in 1946 Howard married Phyllis Koshland. In 1949 he graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with an A.B. degree in architecture. After several years with San Francisco architecture firms, in 1953 he formed his own practice in partnership with Henry Schubart. In 1967 that firm became Howard A. Friedman and Associates. Friedman worked as an architect and planner until 1982, when he transitioned to the firm's consulting architect. During 35 years of practice, Howard's firm compiled a distinguished record of nationally recognized designs. These include a group-living complex at the Jewish Home for the Aged, Mt. Zion Hospital's outpatient clinic, the modernization of Levi Strauss' Valencia Street factory, and the construction of the firm's award-winning corporate headquarters complex on Battery Street. Other projects included St. Louis Bertrand Church in Oakland, and the Levi Strauss headquarters in Powell, Tennessee, which was dedicated to Howard in 1982. In later Howard served as master architect for the south terminal expansion at San Francisco International Airport, where he set an extraordinary precedent in employing and successfully coordinating a wide spectrum of small, local, minority and women-owned design firms. Friedman completed projects in Northern California, Nevada, Georgia, Texas, Mexico, France,Holland, and Spain. He retired from private practice in 1984, in part to devote more time to teaching and academic affairs. With former student Robert DeGoff, he co-authored Construction Management for Architects, Engineers and Owners published by John Wiley and Sons in 1985, and Issues for Seismic Strengthening of Existing Buildings, with Henry J. Lagorio and Kit M. Wong, published by the Center for Environmental Design Research in 1986. Howard continued his active connection with his alma mater throughout his life, as an active alumnus, a devoted supporter of athletics, and a parent of a succeeding generation of Cal students. In 1966 he strengthened that connection when he became a Lecturer in the Department of Architecture. In 1980 he was appointed Professor, and in 1987 he became department chair. In 1971 the American Institute of Architects honored Howard by electing him a Fellow. In addition to his distinguished practice he served his profession as President of the Northern California Chapter of the AIA, as director of the California Council AIA (CCAIA), and as chair of the State of California Board of Architectural Examiners. In 1989 the CCAIA, the AIA, and the California Council of Architectural Education posthumously awarded Howard their Exc ellence in Education Award. Other awards included the Architectural Record award for interior architecture in conjunction with Gensler & Associates for the Levi Strauss offices in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1980, and the campus' Berkeley Citation, also awarded posthumously. Howard had a long record in civic and community affairs. In 1970 he became a trustee of Dominican College and chaired the board in 1973-1978 and 1980-1983. The Dominican College connection represented a pattern. Howard had also been president of the Jewish Home for the Aged in San Francisco. At the time of his death he was a trustee of Mills College, the University of California at Berkeley Foundation, and chair of the Newhouse Foundation. He had also been a trustee of the University Art Museum. Howard Friedman died suddenly on October 28, 1988, in what was to have been the final year of his notable leadership as Chair of the Department of Architecture.
Extent
4 Boxes
Restrictions
All requests for permission to publish, reproduce, or quote from materials in the collection should be discussed with the Curator.
Availability
Collection open for research.