Guide to the Pinedo Family Papers

Santa Clara University Library Archives & Special Collections
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053-0500
Phone: (408) 554-5530
Email: specialcollections@scu.edu
© 2015 Santa Clara University. All rights reserved.


Title: Pinedo Family Papers
Identifier/Call Number: MSS.1974.01.01
Contributing Institution: Santa Clara University Library Archives & Special Collections
Languages: English, Castilian Spanish and Latin
Physical Description: 1.21 linear feet, 2 boxes
Date: 1826-1901 (bulk 1842-1901)
Abstract: The Pinedo Family Papers, 1826-1901 (bulk 1842-1901), document the Pinedo family and life at Mission Santa Clara prior to the laicization of the mission. The records consist of the reminiscences of Encarnación Pinedo, author of El Cocinero Español, along with two copies of her book, property records, military documents, reproductions of marriage and baptism certificates, devotional books, newspaper clippings, family portraits, and photographs of railroad cars. This collection is arranged into one series: Series I. Pinedo Family Life, 1826-1901 (bulk 1842-1901).
Physical Location: This collection is located in Santa Clara University Library's Archives & Special Collections.

Access

Collection is open for research.

Access Restrictions

None

Publication Rights

Materials in Archives & Special Collections may be subject to copyright. All requests for permission to publish from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the University Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of Archives & Special Collections as the owner of the physical materials, and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained. Copyright restrictions also apply to digital reproductions of the original materials.

Preferred Citation

Pinedo Family Papers, MSS.1974.01.01, Santa Clara University Library Archives & Special Collections.

Processing Information

Collection processed by Michelle Runyon. Finding aid EAD encoded by Shannon Hartman. Reviewed by Shannon Hartman and Erin Louthen.

Biographical History

In the early to mid-1800s, the Pinedo family was prominent in the Santa Clara Valley, and its history is intertwined with that of Mission Santa Clara and the city itself. The family was well-placed, as is evidenced by Encarnación Pinedo’s account of attending the wedding of Juan Bautista Alvarado, the governor of Alta California, in 1839. According to Encarnación’s personal writings, her father Lorenzo Pinedo built the first family residence in Santa Clara in 1844. The house was located just outside of the Mission Santa Clara grounds on what is now the north side of Alviso Street.
In 1839, Lorenzo Pinedo married Carmen Berreyesa. The union connected the Pinedo, Berreyesa, and Peralta families, all influential Californio landowners before the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848, which greatly decreased their wealth and landholdings. Lorenzo and Carmen went on to have both Dolores Pinedo (b. 1840) and Encarnación Pinedo (b. 1848). Dolores married an Anglo pioneer named William Fitts and had several daughters who are listed in the dedication of Encarnación’s book, El Cocinero Español. William Fitts worked for an electric streetcar line.
Encarnación Pinedo went on to write El Cocinero Español (1898) and became the first Latina to write a cookbook in the United States. It was written in Spanish and includes ingredients from Basque, Spanish, and Mexican cuisines. El Cocinero Español provides a firsthand account of Mexican-Californian cuisine in the United States, largely ignored at the time. The book also gives a flavorful perspective on mission life, both through the preparation of food and through Encarnación’s colorful comments on daily life sprinkled throughout its recipes. An edited edition of El Cocinero Español called Encarnación's Kitchen: Mexican Recipes from Nineteenth-Century California: Selections from Encarnación Pinedo's El Cocinero Español, was published in 2003 and has been used as a valuable resource in early Chicana studies.
In the Mission Santa Clara records, Encarnación’s godfather is listed as Diego A. Forbes, more widely known as James Alexander Forbes. Forbes was a leading figure in the establishment of a preparatory school on the grounds of Mission Santa Clara, which was established as Santa Clara College in 1851. This school was the precursor to the University of Santa Clara. Forbes served on the Board of Trustees for Santa Clara College from 1855-1856.
Bibliography
Fox, Soledad. "Encarnación's Kitchen: Mexican Recipes from Nineteenth-Century California: Selections from Encarnación Pinedo's EL COCINERO ESPAÑOL." Rev. of Encarnación's Kitchen: Mexican Recipes from Nineteenth-Century California: Selections from Encarnación Pinedo's EL COCINERO ESPAÑOL. Gastronomica 2005: 104-05. JSTOR (Accessed Aug. 17, 2015)
McKevitt, Gerald. The University of Santa Clara: A History, 1851-1977. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1979.
Pinedo, Encarnación, and Dan Strehl. Encarnaciόn's Kitchen Mexican Recipes from Nineteenth-Century California. Berkeley: University of California, 2003.
Santa Clara University Archives & Special Collections, Mission Santa Clara Baptismal Records and personal papers of Encarnación Pinedo. http://content.scu.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/mission/id/934/rec/7 (Accessed Aug. 13, 2015)

Organizational History

Santa Clara University was founded in 1851 by the Society of Jesus as Santa Clara College and is California’s oldest operating institution of higher learning. It was established on the grounds of Mission Santa Clara de Asìs, the eighth of the original 21 California missions. The college originally operated as a preparatory school and did not offer courses of collegiate rank until 1853. The institution became known as the University of Santa Clara in 1912, when the schools of engineering and law were added. For 110 years, Santa Clara University was an all-male school. In 1961, women were accepted as undergraduates and Santa Clara University became the first coeducational Catholic university in California. The number of students and faculty tripled over the next decade and the university began the largest building program in school history with eight residence halls, a student union, and an athletic stadium. In the early 1970s, the Board of Trustees voted to limit the size of the undergraduate population, an action that was intended to preserve the character and ensure the quality of the university for generations to come. In 1985, the university adopted Santa Clara University as its official name.
Bibliography
Santa Clara University. “About SCU – History.” www.scu.edu/about/history.cfm (Accessed Nov. 23, 2010)
McKevitt, Gerald, S.J. The University of Santa Clara: A History, 1851-1977. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1979.

Related Material

The Encarnación Pinedo Collection (Digital Collection): http://content.scu.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/pinedo  

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into one series: Series I. Pinedo Family Life, 1826-1901 (bulk 1842-1901).

Scope and Content of Collection

The Pinedo Family Papers, 1826-1901 (bulk 1842-1901), document the Pinedo family as well as other settlers who lived around Mission Santa Clara.These materials provide a holistic view of what daily life was like in the mid- to late- nineteenth century around Mission Santa Clara. The records consist of the reminiscences of Encarnación Pinedo, author of El Cocinero Español, along with two copies of her book, property documents, military documents, marriage certificates, devotional books, newspaper clippings, family portraits, and photographs of railroad cars. The Spanish military documents of Luis Maria Peralta, ancestor of Ernesto “Che” Guevara, are part of this collection. Peralta was amongst the first group of Spanish-speaking families to settle the San Francisco Bay Area and greatly influenced its development.

Subjects and Indexing Terms

Pinedo, Encarnación , 1848-
Santa Clara College (Calif.)
Santa Clara University (Calif.)
University of Santa Clara (Calif.)
Californios
Santa Clara Mission

 

Series I. Pinedo Family Life, Bulk, 1842-1901 1826-1901 (bulk 1842-1901)

Scope and Content

This series documents the day-to-day lives of the Pinedo family for most of the nineteenth century. The series includes devotional books, reproductions of El Cocinero Español by Encarnación Pinedo, photographs, handwritten personal reminiscences, copies of marriage and baptism records, property records, and newspaper clippings. The handwritten accounts of Encarnación Pinedo’s early life reflect what daily life was like in Mission Santa Clara prior to the secularization of the California missions. There are also discharge and transfer documents relating to the military service of Luis Maria Peralta in the Spanish army, written in Castilian Spanish. The material in this series is written in English, Castilian Spanish, and Latin.

This series is arranged topically.
 

Box 1: Devotional Books, Photographs & Newspaper Clippings, 1826-1901

 

Folder 1: Copies of El Cocinero Español, 1898

 

Folder 2: Reminiscences by E. Pinedo, 1901

 

Folder 3: Military—Luis Peralta, 1826

 

Folder 4: Property—Pinedo, through the maternal line, 1865-1874

 

Folder 5: Property—Pinedo, Lorenzo, 1845-1857

 

Folder 6: Marriage certificates (reproductions), 1892

 

Folder 7: Newspaper page, day of President Abraham Lincoln’s death, 1865

 

Folder 8: “Early Days in Santa Clara” (reproduction), 1901

 

Box 2: Family Memorabilia, 1860-1890

 

Folder 1: Oficio Divino, 1865

 

Folder 2: Afectos y Consideraciones de Votas Sobre los Quatro Novísimos Añadidas a Los Exercicios de la Primera Semana de San Ignacio de Loyola, undated

 

Folder 3: Family Portraits, 1860-1908

 

Folder 4: Railroad Photographs, 1888-1890

 

Folder 5: Dick Fellows & Tiburcio Vasquez Newspaper Clippings, 1882