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Ben (Lisa) papers
Coll2015-019  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The collection comprises manuscripts, sheet music, lyrics, poetry, correspondence, personal papers, photographs, sound recordings, musical instruments, and realia, 1905-2009, from lesbian writer Lisa Ben (anagram for "lesbian"), pseudonym for Edythe Eyde. The materials in the collection document Ben's creative writing; her correspondence with family and friends; her employment as a secretary for Hollywood studios; her genealogy and family relationships; and her hobbies in science fiction fandom, folk music, and cat adoption. Also included are clippings and awards recognizing Ben as a pioneer in LGBT history, most notably for creating the first lesbian magazine Vice Versa in 1947.
Background
Lisa Ben was born Edythe DeVinney Eyde in San Francisco on November 7, 1921, the only child to parents Oscar E. Eyde and Olive Colegrove Eyde. Three years later, the family moved to a fruit ranch in Los Altos, California, where Ben spent her childhood and adolescent years. Ben studied music and attended Palo Alto High School, where she graduated in 1938. Her parents urged her to go on to business school, and she soon after worked in secretarial jobs in Northern California during WWII. Her interests in writing, however, led her to move to Los Angeles in 1945 where she knew young aspiring writers in science fiction fan groups.
Extent
15.4 Linear Feet 16 boxes and 1 oversize item.
Restrictions
All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the ONE Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives at USC Libraries as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.
Availability
The collection is open to researchers. There are no access restrictions.