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Finding Aid to the Grant Jackson Papers MS.538
MS.538  
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Box 1

Scope and contents

Box 1 Files

  1. MS by Jackson “State Division -a menace to Los Angeles”, given as a speech before the City Club on October 2, 1909; published in the Los Angeles Times October 3, 1909; published in the Grizzly Bear November 1909. Relates to the proposed division of Calif. into two separate states which he opposes. Accession #G-373-1149
  2. Letter Jackson to Owen C. Coy June 4, 1919. Describes his collection of Californiana, typed copy of the original
  3. Dec. 20, 1915 and undated (probably Dec. 16). Two newspaper clippings about charges against Grant Jackson by Charles J. Genshlea
  4. Certificates of admission to practice in District Court and Circuit Court for 9th Judicial District, both dated January 2, 1903. 2 certificates.
  5. Diploma from Lompoc School March 29, 1886
  6. Report to California Historical Survey Commission of materials from Jackson’s private collection
  7. “Grant Jackson, esq.'' Los Angeles Times January 1, 1906. Newspaper clipping.
  8. “Pioneer data from 1832 from the memory of Don Juan Forster”, Bancroft Library.
  9. Charles E. Huse document. 1852, 1916. Formal statement Huse received regarding the destruction of a ballot box
  10. Charles E. Huse documents, 1917. Correspondence to Jackson informing him of Huse’s death.
  11. Covarrubius documents, undated. “Photographic reproductions of documents found in the mansion of Don [Jose] María Covarrubius”.
 

Box 2

Scope and contents

Box 2

  1. “Execution of Colonel Crabb and Associates, message from the Presidency of the United States.” February 16, 1858 (photocopy). Preservation note, need a flat box or portfolio to fit item properly, approx 10” x 12”.
  2. Scrapbooks of California History include obituaries of California pioneers who died in the early 1920’s