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Finding Aid to the Merritt Thompson Papers, 1896-1970 Coll2013.039
Coll2013.039  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The Merritt Thompson papers, 1896-1970, consists of Thompson's professional and family correspondence, manuscripts and articles he wrote and collected on the topic of education, course materials used in his education classes, translated Inca stories, photographs of his professional and personal life, and documentation of his travels. Thompson was an education professor at the University of Southern California as well as a founding member of ONE Institute of Homophile Studies, the first academic institution in the United States devoted to the study of homosexuality.
Background
Merritt Moore Thompson (1884-1970) was a lifelong educator and gay education activist. Thompson was born and raised in New Jersey. He started teaching in a local one-room country schoolhouse, then went abroad to teach in the Philippines in 1905. He returned to the United States two years later and got a bachelor's degree at the University of Denver. After a time teaching in South America, he moved to California where he taught Spanish at the University of Southern California. He got his masters and doctorate in education at the University of Southern California and became the university's director of student teaching for 31 years. Thompson's writings include The History of Education published in 1951.
Extent
2.3 linear feet. 3 archive cartons + 1 flat box
Restrictions
All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the ONE Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives at USC Libraries as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained.
Availability
The collection is open to researchers. There are no access restrictions.