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Description
In 1963 Braggs-Ford, together with Savannah A. Bello, founded the Richmond chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to address discriminatory practices in local housing and employment.The Charlesetta Braggs-Ford Papers consists of reports, bulletins, correspondence, flyers, conference programs, papers, brochures, pamphlets, newsletters, and newspaper clippings that document the activities of the Richmond chapter of CORE. The collection also includes material related to regional CORE chapters and the national CORE organization.
Background
Civil rights activist Charlesetta Braggs-Ford was born on June 22nd, 1935 in Oklahoma to Booker and Viola Braggs. After a degree in nursing she served as a supervisor at Kaiser Hospital in Oakland. In 1963 Braggs-Ford, together with Savannah A. Bello, founded the Richmond chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to address discriminatory practices in local housing and employment. The first members of Richmond CORE were Maxine Easton, Reverend Guthrie Williams, Barbara Thollaug, Samuel Burns, Frank Throtter, Ernest Fridia (first chairperson), Florence Fridia, Giddis Toland, Thelma Hill, and Stalfana Bello. Future members included Gus Wagle, Scott Cole, Stephen Vincent, James Van, Amous Blackmore, Katherine Himes, Helen Talbot, Anthony Scott, John Ogenberger, Elaine Featherson, Carolyn Himes, Randy Thollaug, Robert Chrisman, Brenda Hawkins, Saline Steward, Bob Carleton, Cynthia Hawkins, and John Greene. Richmond CORE focused on issues related to fair employment and housing, schooling, accurate newspaper coverage, and police brutality towards African Americans and other minorities. Committees of the chapter included those on Education, Storm Drainage, and Public Housing. Activities involved working on California Fair Housing initiatives and picketing and negotiation projects with the Bank of America, Safeway, and local department stores. As members began participating with Black Power movement groups in community organizing, Richmond CORE was officially disaffiliated from the national organization at a meeting of officers and delegates to CORE’s Western Regional Conference on August 30, 1968.
Extent
.5 linear feet (1 box)
Restrictions
Permission to publish from the Charlesetta Braggs-Ford Papers must be obtained from the African American Museum & Library at Oakland.
Availability
No access restrictions. Collection is open to the public.