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Finding Aid to the David Sloane Stanley Manuscript Collection MS.629
MS.629  
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Collection Details
 
Table of contents What's This?
  • Custodial history
  • Scope and Contents
  • Preferred citation
  • Processing history
  • Use
  • Access
  • Biographical note
  • Acquisition

  • Title: David Sloane Stanley Manuscript Collection
    Identifier/Call Number: MS.629
    Contributing Institution: Autry National Center, Braun Research Library
    Language of Material: English
    Physical Description: 0.1 linear feet (2 folders)
    Date (inclusive): 1883, 1935
    Abstract: David Sloane Stanley (1828-1902) was a Major General in the United States Army, serving in the Civil War and later conducting expeditions to the West in the 1870s and 1880s. This collection contains one letter from David Sloane Stanley to General Henry Martyn Cist in 1883, and a typed copy of a diary written by Stanley, documenting his journey overland from Arkansas to California between 1853 and 1854.
    creator: Cist, Henry Martyn, 1839-1902
    creator: Stanley, David Sloane, 1828-1902

    Custodial history

    The typed copy of the diary was given to Hazel Hyde by Joseph Wright Rumbough, grand nephew of David Sloane Stanley, on November 17, 1935.

    Scope and Contents

    David Sloane Stanley (1828-1902) was a Major General in the United States Army, serving in the Civil War and later conducting expeditions to the West in the 1870s and 1880s. This collection contains one letter from David Sloane Stanley to General Henry Martyn Cist in 1883, and a typed copy of a diary written by Stanley. The title of the diary is "Diary of Lt. David Sloane Stanley (1852 U. S. M. A.) 2nd U. S. Dragoons, Later a Major General, of an Expedition which made a journey overland from Fort Smith, Arkansas to San Diego, California from July 24, 1853 to March 26, 1854, with additional diary entries to April 9, 1854."

    Preferred citation

    David Sloane Stanley Manuscript Collection, 1883, 1935, Braun Research Library Collection, Autry National Center, Los Angeles; MS.629; [folder number] [folder title][date].

    Processing history

    Processed by Glenna Schroeder, circa 1977-1981. Finding aid completed by Holly Rose Larson, NHPRC Processing Archivist, 2012 October 24, made possible through grant funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commissions (NHPRC).

    Use

    Copyright has not been assigned to the Autry National Center. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Autry Archivist. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Autry National Center as the custodian of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the reader.

    Access

    Collection is open for research. Appointments to view materials are required. To make an appointment please visit http://theautry.org/research/research-rules-and-application or contact library staff at rroom@theautry.org.

    Biographical note

    David Sloane Stanley (born 1828, died 1902) was a United States Army officer born in Cedar Valley, Ohio, on June 1, 1828, the son of John Bratton and Sarah (Peterson) Stanley. He was appointed to the United States Military Academy at West Point on July 1, 1848.
    In 1856 he was sent with his regiment to Kansas to quell the disturbances there between proslavery advocates and "free soilers." On April 2, 1857, he married Anna Maria Wright, whom he had first met while he was a cadet at West Point; the couple had seven children. After service against the Cheyenne Indians on the Great Plains-in which his life was saved by J. E. B. Stuart in a fight near Fort Kearny, Nebraska-he was assigned to Fort Smith, Arkansas, in 1860.
    At the outbreak of the Civil War Stanley, himself a slaveowner, was offered a colonel's commission in the Confederate Army and command of an Arkansas regiment, but he declined the offer and joined other Union forces at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He was appointed a brigadier general of volunteers on September 28, 1861. He fought in the battles of Wilson's Creek, New Madrid, and Island Number Ten in the Missouri campaign of 1862. In consequence of his good work at the battle of Corinth, Mississippi, in October 1862 he was promoted to major general on November 29 and appointed chief of cavalry of the Army of the Cumberland.
    For his "distinguished bravery" at Franklin he was brevetted to major general on March 13, 1865, and awarded the Medal of Honor on March 29, 1893. He was posted to the Fifth United States Cavalry as a major in the regular army on December 1, 1863. He was mustered out of volunteer service on February 1, 1866, and promoted to colonel of the Twenty-second United States Infantry on July 28, 1866.
    While commandant at San Antonio, he ordered the sale to a circus of the remaining camels from Camp Verde, thus bringing to an end the United States Army's camel corps experiment.
    On March 24, 1884, upon the retirement of Ranald S. Mackenzie, Stanley was promoted to brigadier general in the regular United States Army and named commander of the Department of Texas. He retired on June 1, 1892. From September 13, 1893, until April 15, 1898, he was governor of the Soldiers' Home in Washington, D.C. General Stanley died in Washington on March 13, 1902, and was buried in the Soldiers Home cemetery.
    Reference:
    Cutrer, T. W. (n.d.). Stanley, David Sloane, Handbook of Texas Online. Retrieved from http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fst12.

    Acquisition

    Purchased by Library for the Munk Library of Arizoniana from Hazel Hyde, 1941 April; and Morris H. Briggs, 1951.

    Subjects and Indexing Terms

    California -- Description and travel
    Correspondence
    Diaries
    Overland journeys to the Pacific
    Typescripts
    United States. Army. 2nd Dragoons