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Finding Aid to the Walter W. Dalquest papers MVZA.MSS.0072
MVZA.MSS.0072  
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Collection Overview
 
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Description
The Walter W. Dalquest papers include bound and unbound field notes and correspondence. These materials offer insight into the work done by Dalquest between 1936-1990.
Background
Walter W. Dalquest (1917-2000) was educated in the fields of biology, geology, and biochemistry. He received a B.S. in 1940 and an M.S. in 1941 from the University of Washington and a PhD from Louisiana State University in 1951. Having established a personal and professional connection with E. Raymond Hall, Dalquest was convinced by Hall to come to Berkeley, where he stayed from 1941-1945, doing curatorial work, fieldwork, and research for the MVZ. He moved on to the University of Kansas at Lawrence in 1945. After receiving his PhD, Dalquest took on a position with the Biology Department of Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas. He began creating a museum collection there, eventually amassing over 22,000 mammal specimens alone. Over his lifetime, Dalquest published 7 books and 173 research articles. Retiring from full-time duties at Midwestern State in 1984, Dalquest remained active in his personal and professional life until his death. In 1996, Dalquest, along with his second wife Rose, donated a significant amount of land to Midwestern State, creating the Dalquest Research Station. The Station seeks to promote research and education about the Chihuahuan Desert for students and scientists from outside universities.
Extent
0.9 Linear feet
Restrictions
Copyright restrictions may apply. All requests to publish, quote, or reproduce must be submitted to the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology Archives in writing for approval. Please contact the Museum Archivist for further information.
Availability
The collection is open for research.